Kilcornan

Sheena Dowzard-Mee

Kilcornan House
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The townland name is: Kilcornan  

The Gaelic (Irish) form of the name is:     Cill Chornain (The church of Cornan.)

Kilcornan is in County Galway. It is in the Barony of Dunkellin and in the Civil Parish of Stradbally. It is in the District Electoral Division of Clarenbridge.

Other Forms of the Name with authority source (if provided) in italics are:

Cill Chornain, Killcornan (A. F. St. George, Esq., Tyrone). Kilcornan( Clerk of the Peace)

Kilcornane. (Six qrs. County Book,) Kilcornan (County Map), Kilcornan (County Registry 1820),Kilcornin (High Constable for the Barony),Kilcornan (Inq. Temp. Jac. I).Kilcornane (Quit Rent Ledger),Kilcornan (Quit Rent Ledger)Kilcornan (Sketch Map),Kilcornan (Tithe Composition Book).

Situation:

The townland of Kilcornan is in the civil parish of Stradbally, in the barony of Dunkellin. It is located to the west of the parish and is bordered by the townlands of Hillpark and Stradbally East to the west, Slieveaun, Gortard, Cloghalahard and Tarramud to the north and Toberbracken and Roevehagh to the east. It is bordered on the south by Castlegar and Kileely Beg.

Information from Down Survey

The Down Survey says there is no information available for this townland.

Information from O’Donovan’s Field Name Books (1838)

According to O’Donovan’s Field Name Books of 1838, the proprietor of the townland of Kilcornan was Thos. Redington, Esq., who occupies the whole townland forming his Demesne. It describes the home of the former as, “a neat family mansion here called Kilcornan House, the residence of Prop.” There was a considerable part of this townland under plantation and ornamental ground. In the South part there are about 130 acres of underwood. The grounds of the Demesne were very well laid out, and the mansion house pleasantly situated. Cleran river(sic) which runs through the townland rises a little west of the house. In the centre of the townland is an old church in ruins. There were 6 quarters of Kilcornan – namely Garryduff, Fanogmore, Gortardout, FTrmonree, Moneylecal and Knockangarranbane.

Information from Griffiths Valuation (1855)

According to the Griffiths Valuation of 1855, Kilcornan covered an area of 814 acres, 0 roods and 28 perches. Of this land, all was owned by Sir Thomas N. Redington.

The land was valued at £466 5s and 8d.

Building value at the time was listed at £160.

Total value was £544 19s and 8d.

 1901 Census.

The census was taken on Sunday 31st March 1901. According to the Enumerator’s Abstract form at this time, there were three dwellings in Kilcornan,all of which were inhabited and there was one family per dwelling. 18 people lived in the townland, of whom 5 were male and 13 female. All residents were Roman Catholic. 12 were born in County Galway. 2 were born in Dublin,1 in Meath,1 in Clare,1 in Waterford and 1 in Queens’s County.(These were all servants to the Redington family) The three houses were owned by Anne Redington.

According to the House and Building Return form, there was one family in each house. All the houses were completed (built) and were private dwellings. In all cases the walls were made of stone, brick or concrete. All of the houses were roofed with slate, iron or tiles. One house was a 1st class dwelling and the other two were 2nd class. Anne Redington was named as the landholder in each case and head of the house for the 1st class dwelling. There were 30 rooms occupied in this house and 3 rooms and 7 rooms respectively in the other two houses.

According to the Out-Offices and Farm Steadings Return form, there were 23 out buildings comprising 2 stables, a coach house, a cow house and a calf house, a dairy,4  piggeries, 1 barn,1 fowl house,1 boiling house, 1 turf house, 1 potato house, 1 shed,  2 workshops,3 stores,1 forge and 1 other out office.

 

The heads of households in Kilcornan in 1901 were:

Anne Redington (House 1)

Bridget White (House 2)

William Corcoran (House 3)

House 1

Anne Redington (56) was an unmarried landowner living with her two unmarried sisters, Mary Redington (51) and Matilda Redington (50). The two sisters were described in the occupation column as, “holders of dividends.” The other 5 occupants of the house were described as servants. 4 were female: Mary Weldon (55), Kate Murray (31), Cattie Corless (28) and Anne Murphy (25) and 1 male, Patrick Moloney (26). All were unmarried. All could read and write. None spoke Irish.

Anne Redington lived in a 1st Class house. The house had 30 rooms occupied by the family of 8. There were 18 windows to the front and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 23 out-offices and farm-steadings on the Redington house comprising 2 stables, a coach house, a cow house and a calf house, a dairy,4  piggeries, 1 barn,1 fowl house,1 boiling house, 1 turf house, 1 potato house, 1 shed,  2 workshops,3 stores,1 forge and 1 other out office.

House 2

Bridget White (50) was a widow who lived with her unmarried son, Thomas White (19). She had no occupation but he was described as an agricultural labourer. Bridget could not read or write but Thomas could read. They both spoke Irish and English. Bridget White lived in a 2nd class house whose landholder was Anne Redington.  The house had 3 rooms occupied by the family of 2. The house had 3 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles.

There were no outhouses listed for this house.

House 3

William Corcoran (49) and his wife Mary (44) lived in one of the 2nd class dwellings with their 6 children:   John Corcoran (21), Minnie Corcoran (19), Willie Corcoran (15), Delia Corcoran (13), Katie Corcoran (7)and Laurie Corcoran (3). William was a steward and farmer and Mary had no occupation listed. John was listed as farmer’s son. Minnie had no occupation and the other children were listed as scholars. All could read and write except the youngest and all spoke English and Irish except the younger 3 children.

William Corcoran lived in a 2nd class house whose landholder was Anne Redington.   

The house had 8 rooms occupied by the family of 7. The house had 6 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles.

There were no outhouses listed for this house.

1911 Census.

The census was taken on Sunday 2nd April 1911. According to the Enumerator’s Abstract form at this time there were four dwellings in the townland. There was one family per dwelling. All residents were Roman Catholic. 25 people lived in the townland of whom 11 were male and  14 female.11 were born in Galway, 5 in Kilkenny,2 in Wexford and 2 in Queen’s Co., 1 in each of Dublin, Clare, Wicklow, Carlow and England.

According to the House and Building Return form, all the houses were completed (built) and were private dwellings. In all cases the walls were made of stone, brick or concrete. All of the houses were roofed with slate, iron or tiles. One house was a 1st class dwelling and the other three were 2nd class. Anne Redington was named as the landholder in each case and head of the house for the 1st class dwelling. A change from the 1901 census requests that the number of rooms in a house and the number of windows to front determine what classification the house is given. The Redington’s house has “13 or more rooms” and 18 windows giving it 1st class status.(Actually occupied 46 rooms) The Corcoran’s house has “5 or 6 rooms” and 3 windows giving it 2nd class status and the Bourke’s house has the same.(Actually occupied 8 rooms.) The White’s house has “2,3 or 4 rooms” and 4 windows  giving it 2nd class status. (4 rooms were actually occupied.)

According to the Out-Offices and Farm Steadings Return form, there were 27 out buildings comprising comprised 2 stables, a coach house, a cow house and a calf house, a dairy, 6 piggeries, 1 barn,4 fowl houses,1 boiling house, 3 turf houses, 1 potato house, 1 shed,  1 workshops,2 stores, and 1 forge.

The heads of households of Kilcornan in 1911 were:

Anne Redington (House 1)

William Corcoran (House 2)

Thomas White (House 3)  

William Bourke (House 4)

House 1

Anne Redington (66) was an unmarried landowner living with her one unmarried sister, Mary Redington (61). Anne described herself as “landowner” and her sister had no occupation or status. Her 5 year old grandniece, Maureen Wilson Lynch had joined the household. The other 5 occupants of the house were described as servants. All 5 were female: Mary Byrne (19), a kitchen maid, was from Kilkenny. Kate Redmond (45), a housemaid, was from Wicklow. May Hughes (25), a child’s maid, was from Wexford and Hannah Murphy (24), a parlour maid was from Clare. Eliza Doran (56), a cook, was from Queen’s County. All were Roman Catholic. All were unmarried. All could read and write. None spoke Irish.

Anne Redington lived in a 1st Class house. The house had 18 windows to the front and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 48 rooms occupied by the family of 8.There were 21 out-offices and farm-steadings on the Redington house .The Redington outhouses comprised 2 stables, a coach house, a cow house and a calf house, a dairy, 5 piggeries, 1 barn,1 fowl house,1 boiling house, 1 turf house, 1 potato house, 1 shed,  1 workshops,2 stores, and 1 forge.

House 2

William Corcoran (60) and his wife Mary Corcoran (58) lived in one of the 2nd class dwellings with 4 children:  John Corcoran (31), Tommy Corcoran (26), Katie Corcoran (20) and Janie Corcoran (13).William was a farmer and Mary had no occupation listed. John, Tommy and Katie had no occupations listed and Janie was listed as a scholar. All could read and write and all spoke English except William and Mary who spoke English and Irish. William and Mary had been married for 32 years and had 7 living children out of 8 births.

William Corcoran lived in a 2nd Class house. The house had 3 windows to the front and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 6 rooms occupied by the family of 6.There was 1 outhouse on the Corcoran house: a fowl house.

House 3

Thomas White (30) and his wife, Anne White (35), lived in another of the 2nd class dwellings with two sons, Joseph White (6) and Thomas White (3).Thomas’s occupation was listed as general labourer. Anne had no occupation. Thomas was now listed as not able to read and Anne could read and write. Both spoke Irish and English. Joseph was listed as scholar and could read and write. Thomas and Anne had been married for 10 years and had 2 living children out of 3 births.

Thomas White lived in a 2nd Class house. The house had 4 windows to the front and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 4 rooms occupied by the family of 4. There were 3 outhouses listed on Whyte’s house: a fowl house, a turf house and a piggery.

House 4

William Bourke (57) and his wife Catherine Bourke (53) lived in at the last of the 2nd class dwellings with   4 children:  John J.Bourke (21), Kate Bourke (16), Frank Bourke(12)and Edward Bourke (17) and a boarder, Rudolph Edward (Edwards) (8) who could read only and was born in England. William was a pensioner from the R.I.C. and Catherine had no occupation listed. John J.is a gamekeeper, Kate and Frank were scholars and Edward was a butler. All could read and write. There were only dashes in the language column which does not accurately indicate whether the family speaks only English or Irish and English. William and Catherine had been married for 27 years and had 8 living children out of 10 births.

William Bourke lived in a 2nd Class house. The house had 3 windows to the front and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 6 rooms occupied by the family of 7. There were 2 outhouses on Bourke’s house: a fowl house and a turf house.  

 

This page was added on 14/03/2017.

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