Tumneenaun

Tom Naíonán

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Tom Naíonán, meaning Nenan’s Bush

www.logainm.ie

Names:

There were many forms of this village name when O’Donovan’s Survey of Field Name Books was published in 1838. It gives the following listing of spellings; Tumneenaun, Tom Naonáin, Tumninane (map of property 1760), Tumnanine (Leases 1837), Tumninane (Map of Property 1815), Tumneenaun (Boundary Surveyors Sketch Map), Thomneeaun (County Map), Tumneenaun (Meresman), Tomneenane (Tithe Ledger), Tumneenane (Rev. Michael Waldron, P.P.), Thumneenaun (Local), Thumneenaun (County Cess Collector). In addition to this Fr. Michael Flannery collected the following information on the townland in the 1980s; Tuaim Naoinéain – Children’s burial plot. The farmhouse above the farmyard in Ebor Hall is built on this graveyard.

According to Coimisiúin na Logainmneacha (logainm.ie) Tumneenaun (Tom Naíonán) had one minor feature, Lisín na Catharach/Lisheennacahergh.

Situation:

The village is situated in the south side of the Civil Parish of Cong and in the Barony of Ross. It is bounded on the north by the townland of Gortnarup, on the west by Ballard; on the east by Dooroy and on the south by Lough Corrib.

Description:

The Down Survey:

The Down Survey revealed yet another variation of the name, it was recorded as Tumninan. In 1641 the owner was Sir Thomas Blake a Protestant, and in 1670 the owner was another Protestant by the name of John Brown, Dublin College. He was the Provost of Trinity College Dublin at the time. Tumninan (sic) was described as being in the half Barony of Ross and in the Parish of Cong. Unprofitable land amounted to 77 plantation acres, profitable land 231 acres, and 231 plantation acres was forfeited.

O Donovan’s Field Name Books (1838):

According to O’Donovan the townland was under the proprietorship of the Provost of Trinity College, Dublin. The agent was Alexander Nesbitt, Jnr., Esq., with an address at no 96 Stephens Green, South Dublin. The lands were all held under lease by Mr. James Fair, Jnr., Fairhill, and sublet to tenants. The rents ranged from 12 ½ to 21 shillings per acre with Mr. Fairs rent being bulked at £50 yearly.

O’Donovan described the soil as light, producing light crops of potatoes and oats. The farms ranged in size from 4 ½ to 25acres. The county assessment for the property was 11 ¼ d. paid per acre half yearly for 154 acres. There was a bridge across a river between this townland and Ballard and neither was named. He mentions a fort called Lisskeennaearragh (Lisín na Catharach) and Innishhamweean Island.

Griffiths Valuation (1855):

At the time of Griffiths Valuation 1855, William Booth held 3 townlands in the parish of Cong and townlands in each of the parishes of Kilmainbeg and Kilmainmore in the Barony of Kilmaine, Co. Mayo. These lands were parts of the estates of D’Arcy of Ballykine and ffrench of Claremont, Co. Roscommon, sold in the Encumbered Estates Court in 1852. Lane contends that Booth sold them on to Joseph Skerrett Blake of Lissavally in 1857. He also held the townland of Tumneenaun (Ordnance Sheet 27) from the Provost and Fellows of Trinity Collage Dublin. According to Griffiths Valuation 1855, Mr.Boothe (sic) was the sole occupier of the townland that had a total acreage of 300 acres with the annual rateable valuation of £124. He built Ebor Hall on lands leased from the Provost of Trinity College. The Description of Tenement states that there was a house, steward’s house and offices on the land. The Rateable Annual Valuation was £94.00 for the land, with an additional £30.00 for the buildings.

Census 1901:

The Census for 1901 indicated that there were 9 houses in Tumneenane, 8 were lived in, 1was unoccupied. Thirty three occupants were recorded, 18 were male and 15 were female. John Joyce in house 7 was born in County Mayo, while the other occupants were all born in County Galway. All were Roman Catholic;

House 1: Michael and Catherine Corbett

Michael (45) and his wife Catherine (44) lived in house 1 with their five children. Michael’s occupation was listed as shopkeeper and farmer. Michael could not read or write, his wife could not read. Daughter Mary (12) and sons Michael (11) and Patrick (7) were scholars. Mary and Michael could read and write. Thomas (9), Patrick (7) and Margaret (5) could not read and write. The family spoke both Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house. Seven family members occupied three rooms. They had a cow house.

House 2: Patrick and Julia Mannion

Patrick (60) a farmer and his wife Julia (71) lived in house 2 with their daughter Bridget (18).  Bridget could read and write but no occupation was listed for her. The family were bilingual. Her parents could not read or write. Their house was listed as a 3rd class house. Three family members shared three rooms. They had a cow house and barn.

House 3: Patrick and Kate Philban (sic)

Patrick (60) and his wife Kate (60) lived in house 3 with their sons Thomas (30) and Michael (21). The family could not read or write. Farming was Patrick’s occupation and his son Thomas was a carpenter. Michael’s occupation was not listed. The parents and sons were bilingual. They lived in a 3rd class house and four family members shared three rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 4: John and Ellen Sweeney

John (30) a farmer and his wife Ellen (27) lived in house 4 with their three children. Bridget was (3), Mary (2) and infant Margaret was 8 months old. John and Ellen could read and write and they were bilingual. John Joyce (80) was a visitor at their home and he spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 3rd class house and occupied two rooms. There were no outbuildings on the property.

House 5: Patrick and Bridget Sweeney

Patrick (62) and his wife Bridget (60) resided in house 5. Patrick worked as a farmer. Irish was their spoken language and they could not read. They home was a 2nd class house and the couple had three rooms. They had a cow house and a barn.

House 6: Margaret Corbett

Margaret (65) a married farmer was listed as head of the household. She could not read or write. She lived in house 6 with her son David (29) and her daughter Mary (26). They were able to read and write and the family were bilingual. Their occupations were not recorded and they were both single. Their home was a 2nd class house and three people shared two rooms. The property also had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 7: Martin and Bridget Joyce

Martin (64) and his wife Bridget (55) were resident in house7. Martin a farmer was born in County Mayo. He and his wife Bridget spoke Irish only and could not read. They had five children. Their son William (30) was a farm servant. Stephen (26), John (24), Bridget (20) and Martin (16), did not have any occupations listed for them. The children could read and write and were bilingual. They lived in a 2nd class house and seven family members shared four rooms. They had a stable on the land.

House 8: Patrick Kearney

Patrick (27) was listed as head of the household. He worked as a gardener and was not married. He could read and write and spoke Irish and English. The house he resided in was listed as 1st class. It had a slate roof and had twelve windows to the front. Patrick occupied one of the twenty one rooms. There was sixteen outbuildings, 5 stables, 2 coach houses, 1 harness room, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 boiling house, 1 turf house, 1 potato house, 1 shed and 1 store.   J. D. Hamilton was recorded as the landholder,

House 9: was unoccupied and Patrick Sweeney was listed as the landholder.

Census 1911

Ten years on the Census forms for 1911were expanded to include Particulars as to Marriage, completed years the present marriage had lasted, children born alive to present marriage, and children still living. The final column had a list of infirmities to include Deaf and Dumb; Dumb only; Blind; Imbecile or Idiot; or Lunatic. (However when one was widowed or was a widower, the information on the number of children born to the family or the length the marriage had lasted was not recorded).

The 1911census indicated there were 9 houses in Tumneenane, 8 were lived in, 1was uninhabited. Thirty five occupants were recorded; 17 were male, 18 were female. All were Roman Catholic.

House 1: David and Bridget Corbett

David Corbett (40) and his wife Bridget (35) lived in house 1 with their two young daughters. David a farmer was married to Bridget for 4 years and 2 children. Bridget was 3 and Margaret was a1 year old child. The parents spoke Irish and English and could read and write. Their house was 2nd class and the family of 4 shared 3 rooms.

House 2: Michael and Catherine Corbett

Michael Corbett (53) a farmer and his wife Catherine (53) were married for 25 years. They had 5 children, 2 were still living. Michael (22) was listed as a farmer’s son’ as was his brother Patrick (18). The family could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Their house was 2nd class and 4 family members shared 3 rooms.

House 3: Thomas and Catherine Philbin

Thomas Philbin (40), a farmer and carpenter was married to Catherine (25) for 1 year. Thomas could not read while his wife could read and write. They were both bilingual. Their house was listed as a 2nd class house (it was a two storey building with a slate roof and was newly built in 1909). The couple occupied six rooms. Thomas had a workshop on the property.

House 4: Patrick Philbin

Patrick Philbin (69) a widower lived with his son Michael (33) in house 4. Patrick worked as a farmer and Michael was listed as ‘a farmer’s son. They were bilingual but could not read. Their home was a 3rd class house and the father and son shared 3 rooms.

House 5: John and Bridget Joyce

John Joyce (27) and his wife Bridget (28) lived in house 5. The couple were married for four years and had two children, Thomas was (3) and the infant Mary was 7 months. John and Bridget could read and write and spoke Irish and English. John was a farmer. The home was a 2nd class house and the couple and their children occupied 3 rooms.

House 6: John and Ellen Sweeney

John Sweeney (42), a farmer was married to Ellen (43) for fourteen years. They had nine children, all were still living. Bridget (13), Mary (12), Margaret (11) and Patrick (9) were scholars. Ellen was (6), Michael (5), Catherine (3), Annie (2) and Michael was (1) year old. The parents and school going children could read and write. The family were bilingual. The house was a 2nd class house and 11 family members shared 3 rooms.

House 7: Dr. Joseph Boyd and Ellen Boyd

Dr. Joseph Boyd (54) was listed as a medical doctor and general practitioner. He was married to Ellen (39) for 22 years and they had two children. Dr. Boyd was born in County Roscommon and his wife was born in Liverpool. Their daughter Zita (12) and son Michael (8) were born in County Galway. Annie Jinks (36), born in London was part of the household and her occupation was listed as nurse and domestic servant. Mary Kyne (16) was born in County Galway and worked with the family as a cook and domestic servant. All members of this household could read and write and Mary Kyne was bilingual. They were all Roman Catholic. The house was listed as a1st class house and the amount of rooms that were available to a small family was in stark contrast to the other houses in the village. Six people occupied 22 rooms.

House 8: Martin Joyce

Martin Joyce (76) a widower lived with his son Stephen (32) at house 8. Martin a farmer spoke Irish only and could not read. His son was listed as a farmer’s son’ and he could read and write and spoke Irish and English. The home was a 2nd class house, the father and son occupied 3 rooms.

House 9: Dr. Joseph Boyd

The house was uninhabited. The six outbuildings may have been in use, one was a coach house and five were stores. These were recorded on The Out – Offices and Farm – Steadings Return (Form B2).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This page was added on 31/03/2017.

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