Killimor Diaspora

Emigration has always been a feature of Irish life down through the centuries. The Ulster Plantation and the Cromwellian Conquest, in the 17th century, led to many people seeking refuge on the European Continent. Likewise, the Williamite Wars led to much military emigration to Europe. From the beginning of the 19th century emigration across the Atlantic to the United States and Canada began in earnest. During this time a small number of emigrants went to the old penal colony of Australia.

Emigration to Australia between 1828 and 1860.

The Galway Emigrant Index showed a list of people who emigrated from Galway to Australia, New South Wales and Queensland, from 1828 to 1860. This index was compiled by Peter Madden, Newcastle, Australia, who wishes the index to ‘be considered as a finding aid, NOT as an absolutely definitive foolproof work’. People who fully paid their own passage (e.g. to seek gold) or who were convicts, are not included, so those people who emigrated possibly did so for economic reasons. Because of the fact that some entries are difficult to decipher and the spelling of the name varies, it was not possible to ascertain that the place mentioned each time is our parish of Killimor.
The people listed below emigrated between 1841 and 1858, which was before and during the Great Famine.

QuinnJohn Head and his wife Bridget emigrated on the ship Lady Kennaway in 1841. John was twenty one years of age and his wife was twenty two. Their address was written as “Killinor”. John’s parents were named as John and Bridget Head and his wife’s parents were given as John Head and Nancy. Both fathers were farmers.
Also on board the same ship was Ann Head, aged twenty two years, whose parents were John and Catherine. The ship’s entry stated that Ann Head was ‘related to John Head on board’.
Accompanying the Heads was twenty year old Mary Quin of “Killinor”. Her parents were John and Mary. Mary’s father was a labourer and the entry said she was also ‘related to John Head on board’ and ‘known to Michael Dolan’. The ship’s document stated that Mary Quin, and Ellen and Honora Brennan were known to Michael Dolan of Garryard. Given that Garryard (Garryad) is a townland in Killimor, and the fact that Dolans lived in the townland up to some years ago, it can be reasonably assumed that all these people came from Killimor.

In 1842, two sisters, Ellen and Honora Brennan of Killimore, sailed on the ship Champion. Both were quite young when undertaking this long and arduous voyage. Ellen was seventeen years and Honora was nineteen. According to the information given, their parents were both deceased and the girls were known to Michael Dolan, Garryard, and to the Minister at Sandymount. The Minister was very likely the parish priest of the time, Fr. Francis J. Coghlan, who lived in Sandymount (Moneenaveena) around these years.
On the same ship was another young girl named Margaret Nevan, aged twenty years. Her parents’ names were not documented but other information available stated that Margaret was ‘entrusted by her father to Michael Quigley’, and that her baptismal certificate was ‘known in Killimore’. Margaret was born circa 1822, but baptismal records in Killimore only date back to 1831, therefore a record of her baptism could not be located.

John Fitzgerald, aged twenty one years from “Killima,” sailed on the Agnes Ewing in 1842. John and Mary were his parents but by this time his father had died. John was ‘known at Ramore and Lisduff’ and his baptismal certificate was at Sandymount. As with Margaret Nevan, any record of his baptism could not located.

Margt. WalshAmong the passengers sailing to Australia on the ship Agnes in 1841, were a John Walsh and a Margaret Walsh. Their address was recorded as “Killimer”. John was twenty four years of age and the ship’s entry stated that he was known to Pat Walsh of Longhill and his parents were named as Patrick and Catherine and their occupation was given as farmers. It cannot be stated positively if “Longhill” is the townland of Laughil (Loughisle) but a Walsh family lived in that townland in the nineteenth century. Griffith’s Valuation 1855, documented James Walsh and Denis Walsh as holding a house, sheds and land in Laughil, and Mary Walsh was recorded on the 1901 Census.
Margaret Walsh, who was nineteen years old and whose parents were also named as Patrick and Catherine ‘was known in Ballibay’, and was under the protection of Joseph Dunbar. The connection with this Joseph Dunbar could not be positively established. However a Joseph Dunbar from Eyrecourt, aged twenty years, and his wife Ellen (née Watton) travelled to Australia on the ship Agnes in 1842 which was the year after Margaret Walsh travelled. Due to difficulty reading original documents the information recorded was not always completely accurate. Again, since the births of both John Walsh and Margaret Walsh pre-dated 1831, no baptismal records were available in Killimor.

Four siblings, Honora, James, Robert and Mary Donelan, boarded the ship Agincourt, which was bound for Australia in 1852. They ranged in age from twenty five years down to fifteen. Their address was given as “Killimora” and their parents were named as John Donelan and Ellen Salmon. Unfortunately, nineteen year old James died on the voyage. Eighteen year old Robert had been a post office clerk in Glasgow for three years. A search through the baptismal records for Killimore yielded no details for these brothers and sisters. However, the baptisms of two other children of John Donnellan and Ellen Salmon were documented. John Donnellan was baptised in Killimore church on 14th June 1837; the sponsors were James Coghlan and Honora Donnellan (who may have been the older sister and the girl who emigrated to Australia.) Then on 12th January 1839 Ellen Donelan was baptised. On this occasion the sponsors were Thomas and Mary Hobbs. Church records gave the spelling of the surname as Donnellan while the Agincourt recorded it as Donelan.

Mary Fahy, aged thirty, from “Killymur”, accompanied by her husband and three children, set sail on the ship Switzerland in 1854. Shipping documents recorded two of the three children as Peter and Michael Fahy but the third child is not recorded. Mary’s parents were named as Thomas and Catherine Mahon who were both deceased by 1854. Her husband was John Fahy from Cashel Ellen (sic) which maybe Castlellen near Athenry. It is by no means definite that Mary Fahy (née Mahon) was from our parish of Killimor, as any indication of her existence could not be found either in the locally held records or in the church records.

A husband and wife, Thomas and Bridget Donnelly, boarded the ship Eliza in 1855. Bridget, aged twenty three years, was from “Killimer”. Her parents were named as James McKinna (sic) and Catherine. By this time her father had died but her mother was at Killimer. Anomalies exist between the ship’s entry and baptismal records in Killimore. Bridget was not recorded but the baptism of two children of James MacKenna and Catherine Quigley was documented. Patrick MacKenna was baptised in Killimore church on 25th July 1832 (the same year as Bridget’s birth!). His sponsors were James Cusack and Susan Collins. On 9th December 1834, another child, Thomas MacKenna, received the sacrament of baptism. Thomas’s godparents were Michael and Mary Collins. Bridget’s husband Thomas Donnelly, also aged twenty three, was from Tenagh (sic).

Luke Broderick, who was an eleven year old orphan from “Killimora”, travelled in 1856 on the ship Vocalist. He was in the care of Michael Lantry, who with his sister Mary Lantry, travelled on the same ship. Luke’s passage was paid by his relative John Broderick, who lived in Goulbourn. He also paid the passage for the Lantrys who were his cousins. Michael and Mary Lantry’s parents were named as Peter and Margaret but were both deceased. Michael was thirty eight years at this stage and Mary was twenty eight. It cannot be ascertained positively where these Lantrys originated. Griffith’s Valuation 1855 recorded a Michael Lantry in Ballynaskeragh who held a house, sheds, land and bog, while a Patrick and Michael Lantry had land in Ahanduffbeg.
John Broderick of Goulbourn must have been a very generous benefactor as he also paid the passage to Australia for another cousin named Brian Monahan. Brian, aged eighteen years, also travelled on the Vocalist with the Lantrys and Luke Broderick. His parents were named as Owen and Honor Monahan. Apparently his father was now dead but his mother lived at Killimer. Unfortunately, no baptismal or school record could be found for Brian Monahan or a marriage record for his parents, Owen and Honor. However a marriage record for an Owen Monaghan and Mary Carey, dated 4th May 1883, was uncovered. It was not possible to ascertain if there was any connection between Brian Monahan and these persons.

In 1858, Mary Mannion, aged fifty one and from Killimer, sailed to Australia on the ship Telegraph. Her parents were Patrick and Ann Broderick who were both deceased at this time. Mary’s husband was named as Patrick Mannion, who it appears, was already in Goulbourn. No local records relating to this family were found in Killimor.
Thomas Mannion aged twenty seven years and from Killymagh, emigrated on the ship Joshua in 1858. It is felt that Thomas Mannion came from Killimor as the ship’s entry stated that his mother Mary, already mentioned, arrived in Australia on the Telegraph. His parents were named as Patrick and Mary. His passage on the ship was paid by his father, Patrick, who was already in Goulbourn. It may be assumed that the aforementioned Mary Mannion was mother of Thomas Mannion.

A young man, Patrick McKenna, whose address was given as Killimer, left for Australia in 1858, on the ship Herald of the Morning. Patrick was twenty two years of age and his parents were James and Catherine. He had a sister Bridget living near Windsor and his mother lived at Kilqueen, which it is felt was Kilquaine (Fahy/Quansboro). A relationship could not be established between this McKenna family and the McKinna (sic) family already mentioned in connection with Bridget Donnelly, though in both instances the parents’ names were James and Catherine.

Ellis Island

Passenger Arrivals: 1892 – 1924
Large numbers of people emigrated from Ireland to the United States between 1892 and 1924, many of them gaining access through Ellis Island. All of these were documented in the Ellis Island Passenger Arrivals List. Among the names were those of upwards of ninety passengers from the Killimor area. The majority from Killimor were aged between sixteen and thirty years. The oldest passenger recorded was John Carey who was sixty two years, while the youngest was Mary Connor aged only two years. Many of them travelled on their own but in some instances passengers travelled with family members or friends. Some passengers were already U.S. citizens and were returning after a brief visit home.

Ellis Island records gave varying amounts of information, some ship manifests contained the person’s name, age, address, with whom they were going to stay in the U.S. and the amount of money they had on their person. Other Ellis Island records gave details of height, complexion, hair and eye colour and their state of health and also the name of the nearest living relative at home in Ireland. From research carried out, the following is an account of the people from the parish who arrived in the port of New York and then passed through Ellis Island to begin a new life in the United States.

Anne Burke, a servant, aged fifty years, and her son Luke Burke, a labourer aged twenty years, from Killimore, sailed for the United States on the ship Germanic. The ship manifest stated that they left the port of Queenstown and arrived at the port of New York on 6th October 1899, their final destination being New Haven. Neither Anne nor Luke had previously been in America. On arrival they had $30 between them. They went to join Anne’s other son Patrick, who resided at 83 Spring Street, Brooklyn, New York, and who paid their passage on the Germanic. Noted also on the ship manifest was the fact that Anne could neither read nor write, but her son Luke was able to do both.

Mary Burke, whose occupation was given as servant, travelled from Queenstown on the ship Baltic and arrived in New York on 2nd September 1904. She was nineteen years of age and this was her first journey to the United States. She had $20 in her possession. Her aunt, Mrs White, of 326W 43 Street, New York, whom she was going to join, paid her passage. A Mary Burke from Clonoolish is recorded in Killimore School Female Register. Mary started school on 22nd May 1893 at six years of age, and so indicating 1885 as her year of birth. However, according to the ship manifest, she was born in 1887 leaving a difference of two years.

Six people from Killimore sailed from Queenstown on the ship Teutonic on the 16th April 1896. They were Kate Broderick, Mary Callagy, Mary Davy, Patrick Duane, Patrick Fitz (sic) and Bridget Neville.
Kate Broderick, aged twenty two years, and described on the ship manifest as a servant from Killimore, set sail for New York on the ship Teutonic, which arrived in the port of New York on 16th April 1896. She had one piece of luggage with her and was not a U.S. citizen. The ship manifest did not give any further information about her except that she intended to remain permanently in the United States.
Mary Callagy, aged only fifteen years, embarked on the Teutonic and also arrived in the port of New York on 16th April 1896. Information about her is also very scant, except to say that she was a servant whose last residence was in Killimore, and who was destined for New York. According to the ship manifest she intended to stay permanently in the United States.
Mary Davy, described on the ship manifest as a twenty year old servant from Killimore, travelled on the same ship. She too carried one piece of baggage.
Patrick Duane, aged nineteen years, who also sailed on the Teutonic and arrived on 16th April 1896, was a labourer who intended to stay permanently in the United States. He too had one piece of luggage, and his last place of residence was given as Killimore. An annotation on Patrick Duane’s life in the United States was created by Kevin Pemrick on 31st October 2004. Patrick married Ellen Thornton and had four children. He settled in Troy, New York, where he was a boilermaker. He died on 3rd July 1936. His name was also spelled as Dewane in the United States.
Patrick Fitz, (sic) who was also on the Teutonic, was, according to the ship manifest, a twenty eight year old labourer from Killimore. He embarked at Queenstown and had two pieces of luggage. The school register in Killimor recorded a Pat Fitzpatrick from Lissaniska whose father’s occupation was given as a policeman. This boy started school at nine years of age on 2nd December 1878. This information suggested that Pat Fitzpatrick was born in 1869, whereas Patrick Fitz, according to the ship manifest, was born in 1868.
Bridget Neville, was a twenty four year old servant who was going to Boston. Like most of the others she had one piece of baggage. Her last residence in Ireland was given as Killimore.

Honoria Broderick, aged eighteen and described as a servant from Killimore, left Queenstown on the ship Teutonic on 4th October, 1900. The ship manifest noted that she had a ticket to her final destination which was New York. She had $20 on her person and her passage was paid for by her sister. She was never in the United States before and was going to her sister Katie in New York, whose full address was not given on the ship manifest. Her health condition was described as “good”.

Mary Broderick boarded the ship Campania in Queenstown and arrived in the port of New York on 24th April 1906. According to the ship manifest she was an eighteen year old servant from Killimore who was able to read and write. She herself paid her passage and had $5 pocket money. She was never before in the United States, was in good health and was going to join her aunt, Mrs. Lawless, 49 Smith Avenue, Kingston, New York. A Mary Broderick from Derrew started school in Killimore on 4th April 1894 aged six years. This age corresponds exactly with the age given on the ship manifest for Mary Broderick who sailed on the Campania.

Lawrence Boland, whose last residence was given as Killimore, was a twenty two year old single labourer. He embarked on the ship Germanic in Queenstown and arrived in the port of New York on 14th October 1898. At this stage he was a U.S. citizen for five years and had a ticket to his final destination, New York. According to the ship manifest he was in good mental and physical condition. A Laurence Boland from Neal is recorded on Killimore school male register. He was six years old when he started school in March 1880 which would mean he was born in 1874. According to his age, as given in the ship manifest, he was born in 1876.

Kate Campbell travelled on the ship Baltic, which reached the port of New York on 27th July 1912. She was a twenty one year old servant from Killimore who had the ability to read and write. Her nearest relative in Ireland was her father, John Campbell, Lusaniska (sic), Killimore. The ship manifest stated that her final destination was New York.

There are five Conways listed in the Ellis Island ship manifests. Of these, two cited Boston as their final destination while three cited New York as their final destination.
John Conway, arrived in New York on the ship Ivernia on 21st May 1900. He was aged twenty two years, could read and write and had never been to the United States before. He paid his own fare and went to his sister Mary Conway, 7 Elm Street, Rochester, Mass. John Conway from Hearnesbrook began his schooling in Killimor in January 1883 at seven years of age. This would mean he was born in 1876, whereas, information on the ship manifest indicated he was born in 1878.
In 1902 Thomas Conway, a twenty three year old farmer with $10 in his pocket, travelled on the ship Luciana and arrived in the port of New York on 22nd June 1902. His final destination was to the home of his uncle Thomas Moran, who lived at 134E 127 Street, New York.
Then on 2nd April 1905 Patrick Conway boarded the ship Celtic in Queenstown. He was a twenty seven year old labourer. He went to his brother Peter Conway who resided at 14 Devon Street, Greenfield, Mass. Killimor school male records yielded information on a Pat Conway from Ramore. Pat started school on 12th May 1884, aged six years which meant he was born in 1878, the same year as gleaned from information on the ship manifest for Patrick Conway.
Of particular interest is the fact that an eight year old child, called Mary Conway, travelled to the United States on board the ship the Baltic which landed in New York on 10th May 1913. Also on board that ship was Mary Connors from Ramore. It is not evident what the relationship was between the child and Mary Connors. It must have been a very daunting experience for that little girl, Mary Conway, setting out from Killimore to go on a major journey into the unknown. Her nearest relative in Ireland was a Mrs. Conway from Heathlawn, Killimore, and Mary set out to join her aunt, Mary Conway, who lived at 135E 39th Street, New York.
The final Conway listed was a twenty two year old servant girl called Mary Conway from Heathlawn, Killimore. She travelled on the ship Caronia which arrived in New York on 13th October 1910. Her cousin paid her passage and she had $50 in her possession, which seemed to be a large sum considering that the average amount that people had was $20. In contrast to the other Conways listed, she had been to the United States on two previous occasions, in 1901 and again in 1909. On both occasions she went to New York. The ship manifest stated that on this particular voyage she went to her cousin, Mrs. M. Conway who lived at 204E 26th Street, New York. Mary was 5 feet and 6 inches tall, with brown hair and grey eyes. There appears to be some connection between this Mary Conway and the eight year old Mary Conway who went to New York on board the Baltic on 10th May 1913. This connection is not known except that their nearest living relatives in Ireland, at the time of embarkation, resided in Heathlawn, Killimore.

Mary Connors, aged twenty six, a servant girl who was able to read and write, travelled on the ship Baltic with eight year old Mary Conway. Her father, Stephen, resided in Ramore, Killimore. Like little Mary Conway she had never been to the United States before and had $10 in her possession. According to the ship manifest she paid her own fare and went to join a friend, Mrs. T. McMichael, who lived in 206 Ogden Street, Jersey City. Mary was 5 feet and 4 inches tall with a dark complexion, dark hair and brown eyes.

Two Costellos travelled to the United States on board the Teutonic and arrived in the port of New York on 15th June 1901. The first, Michael Costello, aged twenty six, was a shoemaker who could read and write. He was a United States citizen and on this occasion his final destination was Bridgeport.
It appears from the ship manifest that Pat Costello, aged nineteen, a labourer from Killimore who was also going to Bridgeport, was a brother to Michael Costello. He was not previously in the United States. He had $10 in his possession but the ship manifest stated that his passage was not paid by himself. He too, was able to read and write and was going to his brother Michael who lived in Ogden Street, Bridgeport.

John Carey, aged sixty two years, embarked on the ship Baltic, left Queenstown and arrived in New York on 2nd September 1904. He was a United States citizen who, according to the ship manifest, was able to read and write and whose last residence was given as Killimore. He had $50 on his person and paid his own passage. His final destination was 509 Parade, Erie, Pa.

Another Carey was mentioned, though written over the original name Carey was Keary.
This lady, Kate Carey, who was aged fifty years, journeyed to New York on the Oceanic, which arrived on 30th August 1905. She was the widow of a labourer and could read and write. Her son paid her fare and she herself had $50. The ship manifest named her son as Joseph Carey, 111 Waverly Place, New York. It also mentioned “Drs. Cert. Senility”.

John P. Callanan, aged thirty eight years, sailed on the Cedric from Queenstown and arrived in New York on 23rd February 1906. He was listed twice on the ship manifest, the first entry was crossed out but it mentioned his brother James Callanan, 427 East, 63rd Street, New York. The second entry described him as a clergyman whose last residence was in Killimore. He paid his own passage and had over $50 in his possession. He was never before in the United States and was going to St. Benedict Rectory, Morris Park, Long Island. According to Church records he was parish priest in Killimore between 1899 and 1922. He is reputed to have solved some issues relating to the division of land at that time in Killimore parish. His exalted character and high sense of justice are mentioned in a local newspaper. He died in Denver, Colorado, on 25th April 1923, at a relatively young age and is buried in the United States. He is commemorated by a headstone in the grounds of St. Joseph’s Church, Killimor.

Three Callagy names are documented on the Ellis Island Passenger List. First was Mary Callagy who travelled on the Teutonic with five other Killimore people and arrived in New York on 16th April 1896.
Next is Denis Callagy, a thirty two year old asylum attendant. He travelled on the Olympic which arrived in New York on 24th July 1912. His father was Martin Callagy, Ardrague, Killimore, Co. Galway. Denis was previously in Westboro, Mass., in the United States and was now going to join his sister Mrs. Burns (or Bunns, the surname is difficult to decipher), 62 West, 38th Street, New York. He had blue eyes, dark hair and a fair complexion and his place of birth was given as Killimore. Killimore school male register recorded a Denis Callagy from Ardrag (sic) whose family occupation was given as bog-rangers, started school on 27th June 1877, aged six years. This would mean Denis was born in 1881, a one year difference from his age as given on the ship manifest of the Olympic.
The third Callagy mentioned was Michael Callagy, a twenty one year old labourer from Killimore, who, according to the ship manifest, was able to read and write. He sailed on the Cedric and arrived in New York on 3rd May 1913. His fare was paid by his cousin and he had $50 in his possession. His nearest relative in Ireland was his mother, Annie Callagy, Lisaniska, Killimore. He was not previously in the United States and was now going to his cousin, James Moran, 248 East, 23rd Street, New York. He had no marks of identification, was 5 feet and 8½ inches tall, of fair complexion with brown eyes and black hair. His place of birth was given as Killimore.

Julia Coghlan, whose last residence was in Killimore and whose final destination was New York, left Queenstown on the ship Umbria and arrived in New York on 20th May 1901. The ship manifest described her as a twenty three year old servant who was able to read and write. She paid her fare herself and had $25 on her person. She was never before in the United States and was now going to her sister, Mary Coghlan, 163 Reading Street, Newark, New York. Her health condition was good though she had anaemia.

Mary Casey of Killimore was destined for New York and sailed on the ship Baltic which arrived in New York on 25th September 1910. Her nearest relative in Ireland was her father James Casey, Killimore. She was twenty four years old, a servant and able to read and write. Mary was previously in Brooklyn and on this occasion was going to join her sister, Miss Casey (first name not given), 57 Madison Avenue, New York. She had $25 and paid her own passage. She had no marks of identification, was 5 feet 8 inches tall with a fair complexion, brown hair and grey eyes.

Two young farmers from Killimore travelled to New York on the ship Cymric and arrived on 4th June 1900.
The first was Peter Duffy, aged twenty four years, who could read and write. His passage to New York was paid by his sister and he had $20 in his possession. Peter was never before in the United States but his two sisters resided at 1995 Fullon Street, New York A Peter Duffy from Oxgrove, whose family occupation was given as herds, started school on 9th November 1884, aged six years. School records indicated that he was born in 1878 but according to the ship manifest his year of birth was 1876.
Michael Lowry travelled on the same ship as Peter Duffy. Michael, aged twenty two, and whose last residence was given as Killimore, had his passage paid for by his sister and he had $25 in his pocket. His final destination was New York where his two sisters lived at 170E 102 Street, New York.

Margaret Ferguson sailed on the Carmania and arrived in the port of New York on 1st October 1913. She was nineteen years of age and was a servant who was able to read and write. She came from Ramore, Killimore, Galway, and her father was named as Thomas Ferguson of that address. She had $40 in her possession and was going to her aunt, Mrs. Hurley, 200E 94 Street, New York. She was 5 feet and 6 inches tall, of fair complexion with brown hair, hazel eyes and in good health.
The records also contained some anomalies and a case in point is that of Mary Flannery. According to the Ellis Island records, a Mary Flannery, aged twenty years left on the ship Teutonic on 20th September 1901, and went to her brother William Flannery, who lived at 300E 78th Street, New York. However, a Mary Flannery was also listed as a passenger on the ship Cymric which departed from Queenstown on 23 September 1901, and went to her brother William Flannery who lived at the address given above. It is also interesting to note that she had $20 in her possession.
Then in 1909, a Mary Flannery, aged twenty eight years and from Killimore, was listed as having been a passenger on the ship Oceanic which left the port of Queenstown and arrived in the port of New York on 8 April 1909. This Mary Flannery was also listed as having a brother William; however, his address was given as 309E 92nd Street, New York. The ship manifest states that her nearest living relative in Ireland was her father Michael Flannery. Her occupation was given as a shop assistant. She was 5 feet and 5 inches tall, of dark complexion, had blue eyes and dark hair. It seems that this was the same Mary Flannery who was listed as having departed Queenstown in September 1901. Perhaps she came on a visit to Killimore, but there is no conclusive evidence to suggest this, at this point in time. A Mary Flannery was found on the Killimor female school register. She started school on 5th March 1883 at four years of age. This would mean Mary was born in 1879, whereas, the Mary Flannery listed on the ship manifest was born in 1881.
Delia FlanneryAlso of interest is the fact that a Delia Flannery and a Vincent O’Meara were also passengers on the ship Oceanic in 1909. It is apparent from the records that Delia was a sister of Mary, as her father was also listed as Michael, and she was going to her brother William, who lived at 309E 92nd Street, New York. Delia was aged twenty years and was also a shop assistant. She was one inch taller than her sister Mary with her height given as 5 feet and 6 inches. She had brown eyes, dark hair and dark complexion. Both Delia and her sister Mary could read and write. There is a three years difference between her age as depicted on the ship manifest and that of a Delia Flannery from Killimore, who started school on 11th May 1891 at five years of age.
Vincent O’Meara left Killimore on the same ship, the Oceanic, and his details are as follows: he was aged seventeen years, could read and write, was 5 feet 6 inches in height with brown eyes, fair hair and a fair complexion. His nearest living relative in Ireland was given as Mrs. Julia Griffin, Killimore. He went to his mother, Julia O’Meara, who lived at 94 4th Avenue, New York. In cross referencing the school registers, a Vincent O’Meara was documented. He started school on 29th April 1895 aged three years, and the occupation of his father was given as a shopkeeper.
In later years Vincent O’Meara and his wife established a very successful business in Killimore and traded as P.V. O’Meara.

Annie Gormally began her transatlantic voyage on board the ship Celtic, and disembarked in New York on 13th July 1912. She was twenty six years of age, was 5 feet in height with brown hair, blue eyes and a fair complexion. Annie could read and write and her occupation was given as servant. She paid her passage herself and had $15 pocket money. She intended to join her brother, Michael Gormally, 210 West 105 Street, New York. Her father, John Gormally, Killimore, Ballinasloe, was named as her nearest relative in Ireland. School records showed that Annie Gormally from Cloncona started school in Killimore in March 1894 at seven years of age. This would mean she was born in 1887, whereas, according to the ship manifest her year of birth was 1886.
Another twenty six year old girl named Annie Treacy travelled on the same ship as Annie Gormally. The ship manifest gave her last residence as Killimore but her nearest relative in Ireland was her father Patrick Treacy, Carrew, Tynagh, Loughrea. She also was a servant girl who could read and write. She had $15 on her person and paid her own passage. This was her first time in the United States and she was going to her cousin, John Treacy, 77 Oraland Street, Newark. Annie had a fair complexion, fair hair, blue eyes and was 5 feet 3 inches in height.

On board the ship Baltic, which docked in the port of New York on 3rd October 1922, was Mary A. Gallagher. Mary was an eighteen year old domestic servant who was bound for New York, where she intended to stay for ten years. Her nearest relative in Ireland was her father, Michael Gallagher, Lisaligna, (sic) Killimore, Co. Galway. This was her first time in the United States and her passage was paid by her uncle. The ship manifest named her uncle, whom she was going to join, as James Walsh, Roslyn Heights, Long Island, New York. Her mental and physical health was good, she had fair hair, a fair complexion and blue eyes, and was 5 feet and 3 inches tall. Mary Gallagher’s age, as given on the ship manifest, corresponds exactly with that given in the Killimore school female register for Mary Gallagher from Killimore who started school on 3rd June 1907, aged three years.

A forty year old labourer, John Glynn, whose last residence was given as Killimore, journeyed on the Oceanic which arrived in New York on 30th August 1905. John could read and write and was a United States citizen. He paid his own passage and had over $50 in his pocket. He intended to join his sister, Mrs. Keary, 160 East, 84th Street, New York. The ship manifest stated that he was in good mental and physical health.

The ship Britannic, having picked up passengers in Queenstown, arrived in the port of New York on 6th May 1899. On board were four Killimore people, Annie Grady, James Haverty, John Haverty and Thomas Rooney.
Annie Grady, according to the ship manifest, was a twenty five year old farmer who was able to read and write. Her passage to New York was paid by her sister and she had $20 of her own. Her sister, whom she was going to join, was named Delia but due to the quality of the original document, it was impossible to decipher her address.
James and John Haverty emigrated on the same ship. John was twenty two years old and James was just twenty. Both were farmers who were able to read and write. Neither one was previously in the United States. Their brother paid their passage and they travelled to his home at 136E 100th Street, New York. They had some pocket money in dollars but the exact amount was not clear on the ship manifest. John Haverty of Lisaniska was recorded in the Killimore school register as starting school on 11th October 1886 aged nine years. His age on the school register tallies with that on the ship manifest which means he was born in 1877. James Haverty, also of Lisaniska, began school on 26th May 1887 aged six years. According to the school register he was born in 1881, a difference of two years from that given on the ship manifest.
Thomas Rooney, aged twenty two, was also described as a farmer. He had a ticket to his final destination which was paid for by his uncle. He had $20 in his pocket but the name and address of the uncle to whom he was going, are very vague but it seems like Thos. Moroney or Rooney, Albany.

Patrick Grady of Killimore, boarded the Luciana at Queenstown and disembarked in the port of New York on 21st November 1903. He was a nineteen year old labourer, in good health, and was able to read and write. He paid for his own ticket and had $5 pocket-money. This was his first time in the United States and he was going to his sister Mrs. W. Routick, 410 Steners Street. Hoboken, New Jersey. Patrick Gready (sic) of Neal, was listed in the school register as having started school on the 26th May 1890, aged six years. This would mean he was born in 1884 and tallies with the age given in the ship manifest.

A twenty year old single man, named Matt Hanney, arrived in the port of New York aboard the Servia, on 5th May 1893. The ship manifest gave his destination as Brooklyn, and his last residence as Galway. There is no allusion to Killimor but an ancestor of the Hanney family of Kylemore and Heathlawn emigrated in those years. The male school register lists a Mathew Hanney of Kylemore, who started school on 20th June 1878, aged five years. The age given in the ship manifest tallies with that recorded in the school register, which would mean Matt/Mathew was born in 1873. However, the baptismal register shows only one person of that surname for 1873. Martin Hanny was baptised on 29th April 1873. The parents’ names are given as James Hanny and Margaret Power.

Various people with the surname Head made the transatlantic journey between 1901 and 1914.
Mary Head, whose last residence in Ireland was given as Killimore, boarded the Oceanic in Liverpool. This ship arrived in the port of New York on 17th April 1901. Mary, described as a servant, was not in the United States previously. She paid her own passage and had $23 in her pocket. She was going to her cousin, whose surname also was Head, who lived at 228E 360 Street, New York. A young child named Mary Connor, travelled with Mary Head.
Mary Connor was only two years old and was travelling to her father who lived at 13 Susan ? Street, Kingstown or Kingston. This child had $15 on her. It is not evident if the child was related to Mary Head or if Mary was assuming responsibility for her on the journey.

Michael Head, a twenty one year old farmer, who was able to read and write, arrived in the United States aboard the Celtic on 2nd April 1905. He was not previously in the U.S. His sister paid his passage and he himself had $20. His sister also paid the passage for another sister Delia Head, aged twenty, who travelled on the same ship. She also had $20. They were both going to their sister Margaret Head, 16 Harwood Place, Brooklyn, New York. The Killimore school register listed a Michael Head of Cloncona who started school on 14th May 1888 aged six years. This would mean he was born in 1882, but according to the ship manifest Michael Head was born in 1884, which would mean a difference of two years. At that time ages were not recorded very accurately, so it cannot be established if this was one and the same person.

The ship Celtic figures again in 1911 when Mary Head and Julia Monahan boarded in Queenstown and arrived in New York on 22nd September 1911.
Mary Head, according to the ship manifest, was a twenty nine year old servant, whose father Michael Head resided at Lurgan, Killimore, Ballinasloe. Mary herself paid her passage and had $25 pocket money. She intended to join her cousin, Patrick Head, 22 Sutton Place, New York. Mary had brown hair, brown eyes, a dark complexion and was 5 feet 2½ inches in height.
Julia Monahan’s nearest relative in Ireland was her father, Patk. Monahan, Lurgan, Killimore, Ballinasloe. She was a twenty three year old servant who was able to read and write. She paid her own fare and had $25 on her person. She had no particular marks of identification, was 5 feet and 3 inches tall, of light complexion, with brown hair and blue eyes. Julia was going to Mrs. John Monahan, 106W 136 Street, New York.

Mary Head was on the passenger list of the ship Cedric which arrived in New York on 2nd October 1914. Some details on the ship manifest suggested that she was the same person who travelled on the Celtic in 1911. She was previously in the United States, paid her own passage and this time she had $38 of her own. She was going to the same cousin at the same address. Some anomalies are apparent. Her nearest relative was now given as Mrs. Head, Lurganmore, Killimore, her height as 5 feet 2 inches and her complexion as pale. There was also an age difference; she was twenty nine years in 1911 and thirty four years in 1914.
Included in the Killimore school female register was Mary Head from Lurgan, who started school on 2nd May 1887, aged seven years. This meant she was born in 1880 and this age tallied with the age given on the ship manifest of the Cedric.
Michael Rocke travelled to New York with Mary Head on the Cedric. He paid his own passage and had $45 in his possession. Michael was described as having a fair complexion, brown hair and blue eyes and was 5 feet 10 inches tall. He was a twenty two year old labourer who could read and write. His place of birth was given as Ballinasloe. His nearest relative in Ireland was his mother, Mrs. Rocke, Lurganmore, Killimore, Co. Galway. He was now going to his cousin Mary Head who resided at 22 Sutton Place, New York.

Five Killimore women, namely Mary Flannery, Kate Glenn, Alice Glynn, Mary Good and Nora Hanrahan sailed from Queenstown on the ship Teutonic. The ship docked in the port of New York on 20th September 1901.
Mary Flannery’s story has already been documented at the beginning of these profiles.
Kate Glenn, a twenty four year old servant girl, was never before in the United States. She hoped to join her brother Dan Glenn, who resided at 109E 57 Street, New York. Her sister paid her fare and she had $15 of her own.
Alice Glynn, a twenty six year old housemaid, paid her own passage to her final destination New York, and had $10 pocket money. She was a United States resident and was going to 109E 37 Street, New York.
Mary Good, unlike Alice Glynn, was not previously in the United States. She was now bound for New York to join her sister, Katie Good, who lived at 16E 120 Street, New York. Her sister paid her passage and Mary herself had what seemed like $45 pocket money, which seemed a substantial amount for those years. According to the ship manifest she was a twenty five year old farmer’s daughter whose last residence was given as Killimore.
The fifth lady from Killimore was Nora Hanrahan. The ship manifest indicated that she was a twenty seven year old servant girl who could read and write. She had already spent time in New York during 1901. She carried $30 and her sister paid her passage. She was going to her brother Patrick’s home at 172E 3rd Avenue, New York. An additional address for Nora was given on the ship manifest. This was 50E 79 Street but the significance of this second address could not be ascertained.

Margaret and Timothy Hearne, boarded the ship Majestic (1890) in Queenstown and arrived in New York on 8th June 1898.
Margaret, who was a United States citizen for five years, paid her own passage. She was a twenty six year old servant girl and was rejoining her sister, Mrs. Duane, 186E 98 Street, New York.
Timothy, her brother, was a twenty one year old labourer going to the United States for the first time. He had $30 in his possession and his fare was paid by his brother. He too was going to Mrs. Duane. School records showed that Timothy Hearne, of Cloncona, started school on 28th April 1884, aged seven years, which meant he was born in 1877. This corresponds exactly with the ship manifest which gave his age as twenty one in 1898.

Andrew Kelly boarded the Umbria in Queenstown and landed in New York on 18th March 1906. He was a twenty year old single labourer who could read and write. He paid his own fare to New York and had $50 pocket money. This was his first time in the United States and his nearest relative there was his sister, Nora Kelly, 804 5th Avenue, New York. The ship manifest named his last residence as being Killimore and stated that Andrew was in good health.

Peter Kelly, according to the ship manifest, gave his last place of residence as Killimore but his place of birth as Kiltormer, Co. Galway. He arrived at his final destination, New York, on the ship Majestic which docked on 29th April 1909. He paid his own passage and had $10 in his pocket. He was a thirty two year old labourer going to his sister, Mrs. Stanton, 930 Columbus Avenue, 106th Street, New York. He was of fair complexion, had dark hair, grey eyes and was 5 feet 8 inches tall. His nearest relative in Ireland was his brother, Thomas Kelly, who lived in Kiltormer.

Katherine and Mary Kelly both sailed for the United States on the ship Celtic which arrived in the port of New York on 2nd April 1905. No information on these girls could be located as the ship manifest did not correspond with the passenger record. All that is known is that Katherine was twenty one years of age and Mary was sixteen, and both were from Killimore.

A twenty two year old labourer named Patrick Keary arrived in the port of New York on board the Cedric on 3rd May 1913. His passage was paid by his brother and he had $10 of his own. He was not before in the United States and was now meeting with his brother, John Keary, who lived at 135 East, Cottage Street, Dorchester, Mass. The ship manifest gave his place of birth as Killimore and described his features as follows: 5 feet 11 inches tall with a dark complexion, black hair and brown eyes. He was in good mental and physical health. His nearest relative in Ireland was his father, Thomas Keary, Kylemore, Killimore. A Patrick Keary of Kylemore started school on the 27th May 1895 at five years of age which would indicate he was born in 1890. According to the ship manifest Patrick’s year of birth was 1891.

Bridget J. Kilkenny, of Killimore, boarded the Teutonic in Queenstown and arrived in New York on 7th April 1904. She was a nineteen year old servant who was able to read and write.
The ship manifest gave her last residence as Galway and her final destination as New York. She had $5 on her person and her passage was paid for by her sister. Bridget was not previously in the United States but her sister Mary lived at 50 West, 87th Street, New York. Her nearest relative in Ireland was not mentioned on the ship manifest.

Peter Larkin’s passage to the United States was paid for by Thomas Larkin. Peter was a nineteen year old farmer who sailed on the Cedric which anchored in New York on 18th March 1904. He could read and write and was never before in the United States but his sister, Mrs. W. Walter, lived at 596 East, 134 Street, New York. According to the ship manifest he had $20 of his own and was in good health. A Peter Larkin was mentioned on the Killimore school register. He started school on 9th May 1892, aged five years, which meant his year of birth was 1887. The ship manifest stated he was nineteen years in 1904 indicating that the year of birth was 1885. Since there is a difference of two years it is not definite if this is one and the same person. Peter’s home address was recorded as Killimore and his parents’ occupation was given as “herd” in the school register.

Bridget Larkin, a thirty five year old lady, sailed from Queenstown on the ship Oceanic. This ship arrived in New York on 5th April 1905. Similar to Katherine and Mary Kelly who sailed on the Celtic in 1905, the ship manifest of the Oceanic could not be located. However a Bridget Larkin was recorded on the Killimore school register as starting school on the 13th February 1875, aged six years. Judging from this information she was born in 1869, whereas the ship passenger list gave her age in 1905 as thirty five years, indicating a one year difference between the two records.

Information on John Lyons of Killimore is scant. He was a twenty seven year old labourer who boarded the Teutonic in Liverpool and disembarked in New York on 1st May 1895. His final destination was New York where he intended to remain permanently. According to the ship manifest he carried two pieces of baggage and his last residence in Ireland was given as Killimore.


Richard J. Matthews (Joe) 1912Richard J. Matthews
 left Killimore at seventeen years of age, to travel to New York. He paid his passage himself and sailed on the Adriatic which arrived in the port of New York on 27th April 1912. According to the ship manifest he was in good health, was 5 feet and 6 inches tall with a fair complexion, black hair and blue eyes. He was a carpenter who was able to read and write. His nearest relative in Ireland was John Matthews, Killimore, Ballinasloe, and Richard was now going to his cousin Cath. Pelly, 15E 60 Street, New York.
The story was told in his family that originally he was to sail on the ill-fated Titanic but circumstances prevented this. Unfortunately his friend from Tynagh, with whom he was to travel, drowned. It stated on the Killimore School male register that Richard started school on 29th March 1897 aged three years. That leaves a one year difference in his age, between that recorded in the school register and that on the ship manifest. After his travels, Richard J. or Joe as he was known locally, worked as a fitter in the Irish Army. While there he became the driver for General Seán MacEoin who was Chief of Staff at the time. He went to work in Ardnacrusha before returning to Killimor in 1939, where he settled down and married.

The Oceanic docked in the port of New York on 16th October 1907. Among the many passengers was John McGann of Killimore who was going to his sister Mary Ann, who lived at 144 4th Street, New York. His father, Thomas McGann, lived at Killimore, Ballinasloe. John was a twenty one year old labourer who could read and write. He had a fair complexion, fair hair, blue eyes and was quite tall being 5 feet 8 inches in height. According to the Killimore male school records, John McGann from Killeen started school on 25th April 1892 at four years of age. This indicated that he was born in 1888, whereas, according to the ship manifest his year of birth was 1886, denoting a difference of two years.

Bridget Monaghan was, according to the ship manifest, a United States resident and suffered from anaemia. She journeyed to New York on the ship Oceanic which arrived on 6th June 1900. Bridget was a thirty eight year old servant girl, able to read and write, and was now going to Yonkers. Her last residence in Ireland was in Killimore.

Michael Monahan, whose father was Patrick Monahan, Derrew, Killimore, was a twenty one year old farm labourer who was able to read and write. He sailed from Queenstown on the ship Cedric and arrived in New York on 18th April 1914. His health was good; he was 5 feet 11 inches tall with a fair complexion, fair hair and blue eyes. He was now going to his sister Julia Monahan of 131G 26th Street, New York. He paid his passage himself and had $20 pocket money. The school register documented a Michael Monahan from Eskerboy who came to school in Killimore on 5th April 1897, aged six years. According to that information he was born in 1891 but according to the ship manifest he was born in 1893, leaving a discrepancy of two years. It is open to question if this is one and the same person.

Two Moran ladies emigrated from Killimore towards the end of the 19th century. Sarah and Annie Moran arrived in the port of New York on board the Teutonic on 13th May 1896. Annie was a fifty five year old housekeeper bound for New York, where she intended to stay permanently. She carried two pieces of baggage.
Sarah Moran, aged twenty one, and described on the ship manifest as a servant girl, carried just one piece of luggage. It was not clear from the records what the relationship was between these two people.

Ten years later, on another of its numerous transatlantic crossings, the Teutonic docked in the port of New York on 26th April 1906. This time Bridget Moran from Killimore, an eighteen year old servant girl, was on board. Her final destination was Roxbury, Mass. where her sister, Kate Moran, lived at 180 Hillside Street. Bridget had $50 of her own and her sister paid her fare. She was able to read and write, was in good health and this was her first time in the United States. Bridget Moran’s year of birth, 1888, as given on the ship manifest corresponds exactly with that of a Bridget Moran from Spaw as witnessed in the Killimore school female register. Bridget started school on 18th June 1893 at five years of age.

Two McGuire girls emigrated from Killimore, both bound for New Jersey but to different addresses there.
Bridget McGuire was an eighteen year old servant who could read and write. She disembarked from the Luciana on 27th May 1899. She was on her way to her sister Mary McGuire, 14 Kerongton Avenue, Jersey. Bridget had $10 of her own but her passage was paid for by her sister.
Sarah McGuire was twenty years old when she boarded the Umbria at Queenstown. The ship arrived in New York on 13th May 1906. Sarah had $2.50 and her sister Kate McGuire of 725 Bergin Avenue, Jersey, paid her passage. The ship manifest described her as a servant girl, who was not previously in the United States.
A Bridget and a Sarah McGuire, both from Lisdeligna, were documented in the Killimore school register. Bridget started school on 19th May 1890 aged seven years, indicating her year of birth as 1883. However, according to data on the ship manifest she was born in 1881.
Sarah was aged six when she started school on 8th June 1893. That would mean she was born in 1887 leaving a difference of one year in her age, from that given on the ship passenger list.

Killimore male school records indicated that three Muldoon brothers transferred from Duniry School to Killimore School on 19th February 1894. Two of the three were named Patrick and James. A Patrick Muldoon and a James Muldoon emigrated to the United States in 1907 but on different dates.
Patrick Muldoon embarked on the Umbria at Liverpool and arrived in New York on 30th June 1907. Patrick was a twenty year old farmer who was able to read and write. He was not previously in the United States and was now going to his uncle, Martin Mooney, Highfield Park, New York. His passage was paid by his brother and he had $10 pocket money. His complexion and hair were fair and his eyes grey. He was 5 feet 9 inches tall and was in good health. School records indicated that a Patrick J. Muldoon came to school in Killimore on 19th February 1894 aged six years, implying that he was born in 1888, but according to the data on the ship manifest, he was born in 1887, denoting a difference of one year. This particular Patrick Muldoon may have been one of the three brothers who transferred from Duniry School.
On board the Caronia, which arrived in New York on 18th September 1907, was twenty seven year old James Muldoon. He was going to his brother Joseph Muldoon of 102W 106th Street, New York. He had $10 in his possession and was able to pay his own passage to New York. He was a mason who enjoyed good health, he was 5 feet 6 inches tall, had a fair complexion, fair hair and blue eyes. He had a brother in Killimore who was named on the ship manifest as Thomas Muldoon. Similar to Patrick, James also transferred from Duniry School on 19th February 1894 at age thirteen. School records indicated he was born in 1881 but the ship manifest indicated his year of birth as 1882, again leaving a difference of one year. It cannot be stated for certain that they were brothers.

Patrick Murphy, who was not previously in the United States, disembarked from the Oceanic on 17th April 1901, having boarded in Queenstown. He was an eighteen year old farmer who was able to read and write. He had $25 in his pocket and his passage was paid by his cousin who was not named but was living at 41 Garden or Gasden E, Kingston, New York. His nearest relative in Ireland was not documented but, according to the ship manifest, his last residence was in Killimore.

Patrick Nevin sailed on the Baltic and arrived in New York on 30th September 1904. He was a twenty eight year old farmer/painter who was previously in New York between 1897 and 1902. His last residence was given as Killimore and his sister, Mrs. Judge, lived at 224 Riverdale Avenue, Yonkers, New York. He was able to pay his own passage and had $40 pocket money.

Sarah Neville emigrated on the Majestic (1890) and arrived in the port of New York on 29th May 1902. Very little information was available about Sarah as the ship manifest was not displayed. The passenger record described her as a twenty year old girl whose last residence was in Killimore.

James O’Hara, a twenty year old labourer from Killimore, arrived in New York on board the Oceanic on 12th October 1904. His passage to New York was paid by his brother and he had $5. He was not previously in the United States and was now going to his sister Mrs. Gilchrist and brother (not named) at 168E 102 2nd Street, New York.
Killimore school records contained the name James Hara five times. The person nearest in age to James O’Hara was a James Hara, Neal, who began his schooling on 13th July 1891 aged six years. According to this date he was born in 1885, whereas the ship records indicated James O’Hara’s year of birth as 1884.

Patrick Quinn’s final destination was Chicago where his friend, James Larkin, lived at 115 North Evers Avenue, Chicago, Ills. He travelled on the Ivernia which arrived in New York on 16th February 1904. Patrick was a twenty five year old farmer who was able to read and write and was not previously in the United States. He had $10 in his possession and paid his own passage. He was in good health and had no particular marks of identification.
Killimore school records corresponded with the ship manifest regarding Patrick’s age. He was from Cloonacusha and started school on 30th March 1883 at four years of age, therefore he was born in 1879.

Hugh Reilly, aged thirty, sailed on the Germanic and arrived in New York on 14th September 1900. He was going to his brother Patrick, 320E 54th Street, New York. He was a labourer from Killimore who was not previously in the United States. He was able to pay his own passage and had $10 pocket money.

Among the passengers on the Oceanic which sailed from Queenstown and arrived in New York on 15th October 1902, were Margaret Reilly and Kate Maguire.
Margaret, who was previously in the United States, was going to rejoin her sister Mrs. Foley, Bayside, Long Island, New York. She was a thirty eight year old housemaid who could read and write. She paid her own passage and had $10 on her person.
Kate Maguire, aged nineteen years and from Killimore, was also a housemaid who was not previously in the United States. She too paid her own passage and like Margaret, had $10 of her own. Kate was going to her grandmother Mrs. J. Colohan, 603 Amsterdam Avenue, New York. According to the ship manifest both Margaret and Kate were in good mental and physical condition. In cross referencing, Killimore school female register recorded a Kate McGuire from Lisdeligna. This girl started school on 19th October 1893, at ten years of age, indicating she was born in 1883. This year of birth corresponds with that given for Kate Maguire who travelled on the Oceanic.

John Shiel, whose final destination was Yonkers, embarked on the Cymric in Queenstown and landed in New York on 4th June 1900. He was a twenty two year old shoemaker whose last residence was in Killimore, and he was not before in the United States. His aunt, Mrs. Reynolds, lived at 20 St. Mary’s Street, Yonkers, New York.
According to the ship manifest John was born in 1878 but Killimore male school register indicated that a John Shiel, of Trean, began his schooling on 5th August 1884, aged seven years, denoting his year of birth as 1877.

Two Killimore people set sail from Queenstown on the ship Baltic and arrived in the port of New York on 28th October 1904. They were Agnes Shiel aged twenty three years, and Thomas Moylan aged twenty four. Agnes was a servant who could read and write and had already been in New York during 1904. She was now returning to her brother Joe Shiel, 90 Maple Street, Yonkers, New York. She had $30 in her pocket and paid her own passage.
Thomas, unlike Agnes was never in the United States, but was now going to Mary’s brother Joe Shiel. He too paid his own passage and had $50 pocket money. It is not evident what the relationship was, if any, between these two people.

Annie Sanders and Mgt. A Madden travelled together on the Oceanic. They disembarked in the port of New York on 9th November 1899. Neither girl was previously in the United States.
Annie was a twenty one year old servant who could read and write. Her fare to her final destination New York, was paid by her sister and Annie had $10 pocket money. The ship manifest gave her last place of residence as Killimore and she was now going to her brother John in Wakefield, New York.
The name Annie Saunders was on Killimore school register, indicating that she started school in October 1880 aged four years. This would mean she was born in 1876, a difference of two years from the age given on the ship manifest for Annie Sanders. Because of the discrepancies in the spelling of the name, and in the year of birth, it cannot be ascertained positively if this is one and the same person.
Margaret A. Madden, aged twenty six years, had $5 pocket money and her aunt paid her passage. She was a servant girl from Killimore on her way to her aunt, Mrs. Gibney (again because of the quality of the original document this name was difficult to decipher) who lived at 503E 17th Street, New York.

John Saunders apparently was a United States citizen returning to the United States on the Teutonic, which docked in the port of New York on 25th April 1901. He paid his own passage to his final destination New York. On the ship manifest under the heading “Nationality” was written CIT. DISCH. ON PIER. Does this imply that he had not to undergo the usual scrutiny on Ellis Island?

Patrick Saunders, who was previously in New York from 1903 to 1910, sailed on the Lusitania, which docked in New York on 13th October 1911. He had $50 in his pocket and paid his own passage. He was a thirty year old single labourer who was able to read and write and gave his place of birth as Killimore. Patrick was in good health, was 5 feet 9 inches tall with a fair complexion, brown hair and blue eyes. Apparently he was returning to join his cousin Mary (whose surname was illegible) but who lived at 239E 50 Street, New York. His mother, Bridget Saunders, lived in a townland in Killimor but unfortunately the name of the townland is also illegible.

Three people with the surname Spring emigrated from Killimore.
The first was Maria Spring, a fifty year old housekeeper, who sailed on the Cedric which arrived in the port of New York on 9th October 1904. She was never before in the United States. Her brother paid her passage and she had $6 in her possession. She was joining her son, named James Boland, who resided at Laurel Street, (next word cannot be deciphered) Cleveland, Ohio. According to the doctor’s report on the ship manifest Maria suffered from senility.
Patrick Spring, a twenty one year old butler from Killimore, embarked on the Adriatic in Queenstown and arrived in the port of New York on 13th June 1907. He was joining his step-brother John Boland, Box 366 Sharpeville, Pa. His brother paid his passage and he had $50 of his own. Patrick was 5 feet 11 inches tall, had a fair complexion, fair hair and grey eyes.
Mary O’Brien, whose place of birth was given as Killimore, travelled on the same ship as Patrick Spring. Mary was fifty years of age, 4 feet 6 inches tall with a dark complexion, dark hair and grey eyes. This was her first time in the United States. She had $15 in her pocket and her husband, Thomas O’Brien, East Bridge, New Jersey, paid her passage.
The third emigrant with the surname Spring was Margt. Ellen. She arrived in the port of New York on the ship Caronia on 30th June 1909. Her ticket to her final destination was paid by her brother Patrick Spring, 1570E 38th Street, New York. She had $10 pocket money. Margaret Ellen was twenty three years old, with a fair complexion, brown hair, blue eyes and was 5 feet in height. Her nearest relative in Ireland was Wm. Spring, Neil, Killimore.
According to the school register, Maggie Ellen Spring from Neale started school on 21st September 1891 aged five years. Her year of birth 1886 corresponded exactly with that given on the ship manifest.

Thomas Star of Ballinahiskeragh travelled to America on the Oceanic. This ship arrived in the port of New York on 28th August 1912. Passenger records stated that Thomas was a twenty year old single man but further information about him proved impossible to read on the ship manifest. His grand-nephew, Michael Starr, originally from Ballinahiskeragh and now living in Ramore, said that Thomas later joined the U.S. army and was killed in action.

Two sisters, Bridget Treacy and Agnes Treacy from Killimore, boarded the ship Cedric and arrived in New York on 15th April 1907.
Bridget, the older of the two, was a nineteen year old servant who was able to read and write. She was 5 feet tall with brown hair, blue eyes and a fair complexion. Both girls were going to their brother John Treacy, who resided at 425 South Orange Avenue, Newark, New Jersey, and who paid their passage. Each girl had $10 in her possession.
Agnes, who was only fourteen, was the taller of the two being 5 feet 1 inch in height with dark hair, blue eyes and a fair complexion.

Agnes White boarded the Cedric at Queenstown which arrived in the port of New York on 5th September 1903. She was an eighteen year old servant, able to read and write and whose last residence was given as Killimore. Her passage to her final destination in New York was paid by her sister and Agnes herself had $20. Her sister Mary White resided at Waldorf Astoria, 34 Street, 5thAvenue, New York. According to the ship manifest Agnes was in good health. Agnes White, according to the Killimore female school register, started school on 18th November 1891 indicating her year of birth as 1885. This corresponded exactly with her age as given on the ship manifest of the Cedric. Agnes was from Kylemore and the occupation of her parents was given on the school records as farmers.

This page was added on 16/02/2017.

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