Hillpark- known later as Clarinbridge/Clarenbridge.

Sheena Dowzard-Mee

Hillpark- known later as Clarinbridge/Clarenbridge.
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Information from O’Donovan’s Field Name Books (1838):

Townland name:

The townland name is Hillpark.

The Gaelic (Irish) form of the name is: Páirc an Chnoic (The Field of the Hill)

Hillpark is in County Galway It is in the Barony of Dunkellin and in the Civil Parish of Stradbally. It is in the District Electoral Division of Clarenbridge.

Other Forms of the Name with authority source (if provided) in italics are:

Hill Park (Clerk of the Peace) , Claren Bridge (County Registry 1820 ) Claren Bridge (County Map), Hill Park (High Constable for the Barony), Hill Park (Sketch Map), Hill Park (Tithe Composition Book) , Hillpark (1901 Census) Clarinbridge 1911 Census).

 Situation:

Hillpark is west of the parish,in Hill Park townland. It is part in Stradbally North.

Hillpark is bounded on the north and east by Slievaun / Slieveaun, on the south by Stradbally North and on the west by the Parish of Ballynacoortia /Ballynacourty.

Information from Down Survey:

The Down Survey says there is no information available for this townland.

Clarinbridge – known previously as Hillpark.(1838)

Information from O’Donovan’s Field Name Books

Townland name: The townland name is Clarinbridge/Clarenbridge -Previously known as  Hillpark.

The Gaelic (Irish) Form of the name is:  Droichead a’ chlairín. (Bridge of the little board)

Clarinbridge/Clarenbridge is in County Galway in the Barony of Dunkellin, in the Civil Parish of Stradbally and in the District Electoral Division of Clarenbridge.

Other Forms of the Name with authority source (if provided) in italics are:

Hill Park (Clerk of the Peace) , Claren Bridge (County Registry 1820 ) Claren Bridge (County Map), Hill Park (High Constable for the Barony), Hill Park (Sketch Map), Hill Park (Tithe Composition Book) , Hillpark (1901 Census) Clarinbridge 1911 Census),Claran Bridge( As on Plan )
Cleran Bridge (County Map)

Situation:  Clarinbridge/Clarenbridge is west of the parish,in Clarinbridge/Clarenbridge townland. It is part in Stradbally North. Clarinbridge/Clarenbridge is bounded on the north and east by Slievaun / Slieveaun, on the south by Stradbally North and on the west by the Parish of Ballynacoortia /Ballynacourty.

Information from Down Survey:

The Down Survey says there is no information available for this townland.

Information from O’Donovan’s Field Name Books (1838):

This townland belonged to Mr. Redington of Kilcornan, who had it let to tenants at will. Rent was from £1 10s per acre. The village of Clarinbridge was in this townland in which there were about 25 families. These were all Roman Catholics. There was a weekly market held in the village and 4 fairs yearly. The soil of this townland was light clay and it was rocky. It produced wheat, oats and potatoes. The houses were made of stone. Some of the inhabitants were poor and others were in comfortable circumstances.

Information from Griffiths Valuation (1855):

According to the Griffiths Valuation of 1855, Hillpark covered an area of 54 acres, 0 roods and 26 perches.

There are 26 heads of household and tenants listed in Griffith’s Valuation, including Sir Thomas N. Redington KCB.

The Hillpark land is valued at: £37 6s 2d.

Building value at the time is listed at: £61 9s 0d.

Total value is: £68 4s 10d.

Occupiers of the lands of Hillpark listed in Griffiths Valuation are  as follows:

Mullin Owen 
Burke Bridget 
Cronley Catherine 
Donohue Michael 
Connell Denis 
Byrne Bryan 
Clarke John 
Jordan Patrick 
Donnelly Catherine
Corles Bridget 
Byrne Patrick 
Burke Martin
Hoad James
Dillon James 
O’Brien Malachy 
Donnellan James
Molloy John 
Mullins John 
Mullins Owen
Lynch Patrick
Unoccupied land
Mullins Eliza
Burke Thomas 
Molloy Patrick 
Grealy Patrick 
Redington Thomas N. 

All lands are owned by Sir Thomas N.Redington and all above are his tenants. In the cases of Eliza Mullins and Unoccupied lands, Patrick Lynch is their landlord.  In the cases of Patrick Molloy and Patrick Grealy,Thomas Burke is their landlord.

Owen Mullin rented 1 acres 2 roods and 36 perches of  land only  from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of  £ 0 15s 0d making  a total annual valuation of same.

Bridget Burke rented a house and garden of 0 acres 3 roods and 24 perches from Sir Thomas N.Redington, with a valuation of £0 15s 0d for land and £1 5s 0d for buildings making a total annual valuation of £2 0s 0d.

Catherine Cronley rented house, office and land of 1 acres  0 roods and  25 perches from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of £0 17s 0d for land  and £1 8s 0d for buildings making a total annual valuation of  £2 5s 0d.

Michael Donoghue rented house, office, forge and land of  0 acres  3roods  and  24 perches from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of £0 15s 0d for land and £2 10s 0d for buildings making a total annual  valuation of £ 3 5s 0d.

Denis Connell rented a house and land of 1 acres  0 roods 14 perches from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of £0 16s 0d for land and £1 14s 0d for buildings making a total annual valuation of £ 2 10s 0d.

Bryan Byrne rented a house only and no land from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of £1 5s 0d making a total annual valuation of same.

John Clarke rented house and office only and no land from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of £1 10s 0d making a total annual valuation of same.

Patrick Jordan rented house and office only and no land from Sir Thomas N.Redington with a valuation of £ 2 5s 0d making a total annual valuation of same.

Catherine Donnelly rented a house only and no land from Sir Thomas N.Redington with a valuation of £1 5s 0d making a total annual valuation of same.

Bridget Corles rented a house only and no land from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation   of £0 15s 0d making a total annual valuation of same.

Patrick Byrne rented 7 acres  0 roods and 12 perches of land only  from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of £3 10s 0d and making a total annual valuation of same.

Martin Burke rented a house, yard  and garden of 0 acres 0 roods and  13 perches from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of £0 3s 0d for land and £2 7s 0d for building  making a total annual valuation of £ 2 10s 0d.

James Hoad rented a house, yard  and garden of 0 acres  0 roods and 9 perches from  Sir Thomas Redington with a valuation of £0 2s 0d for land and £2 8s 0d for buildings  making a total annual valuation of £ 2 10s 0d.

James Dillon rented a house, office , yard  and garden of 0 acres  0 roods and  13 perches from  Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of £ 0 3s 0d for land and £3 12s 0d for buildings  making a total annual valuation of £  3 15s 0d.

Malachy O’Brien rented a house, yard  and garden of 0 acres 0 roods 7 perches from Sir Thomas N.Redington with a valuation of  £0 2s 0d  for land and £2 3s 0d  for buildings  making a total annual valuation of £ 2 5s 0d.

James Donnellan rented a house, yard and garden of  0 acres  0 roods and  9 perches from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of £0 2s 0d  for land and £1 18s 0d for buildings making a total annual valuation of £2 0s 0d.

John Molloy rented a house, office , yard  and garden of   0 acres 0  roods and  9 perches from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of £0 2s 0d  for land and £1 18s 0d  for buildings  making a total annual valuation of £2 0s 0d.

John Mullins rented a house, office , yard  and garden of     0 acres 0 roods and 20 perches from Sir Thomas N.Redington with a valuation of £0 5s 0d  for land and £4 10s 0d for buildings making a total annual valuation of £4 15s 0d.

Owen Mullins rented a house, office, yard and gardens of 0 acres, 0 roods and  18 perches from Sir Thomas N. Redington at a valuation of £ 0 5s 0d for land and £ 7 0s 0d for buildings making a total annual valuation of £ 7 5s 0d.

Patrick Lynch rented a house, office , yard  and garden of 0 acres 0roods and 25  perches from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of £0 5s 0d  for land and £0 5s 0d  for buildings making a total annual valuation of £ 0 10s 0d.

Unoccupied(Vacant) rented a house and  yard of 0 acres 0 roods and 0 perches from Patrick Lynch with no valuation for land and £1 15s 0d  for buildings making a total annual valuation of  same.

Eliza Mullins rented a house, office , yard of 0 acres 0 roods and 0 perches from Patrick Lynch with no valuation  for land and £ 2 5s 0d for buildings making a total annual valuation of same.

Thomas Burke rented a house, office, yard  and garden of 0  acres  3 roods and 0 perches from Sir Thomas Redington with a valuation of £0 15s 0d  for land and £5 5s 0d  for buildings making a total annual valuation of £6 0s 0d.

Patrick Molloy rented a house from Thomas Burke with a valuation of £ 1 10s 0d for buildings   making a total annual valuation of same.

Patrick Grealy rented a house from Thomas Burke with a valuation of £ 1 10s 0d for buildings  making a total annual valuation of same.

Sir Thomas N.Redington  had 30 acres 3 roods and 8 perches in fee with a valuation of £23 10s 0d  for land making a total annual valuation of same.

The 1901 Census.

The census was taken on Sunday 31st March 1901. According to the House & Building Return there were 19 buildings in Hillpark. There were 15 dwellings.12 of these were inhabited. The House & Building return also lists 3 public houses and 1 Post Office each of which also housed 1 family. All the houses were completed (built). In all cases the walls were made of stone, brick or concrete. There were three Public Houses (House 1, 4 and 10) and a Post Office. (House 9).The remaining houses were private dwellings. Two were unoccupied.

According to the Enumerators report there were 11 dwellings. 10 of these were inhabited and there was one family per dwelling. All residents were Roman Catholic and all were born in County Galway. 55 people lived in the townland, of whom 33 were male and 22 female.

The Enumerator’s Report only enumerates up to house 11. There is no report for houses 12-19.

The Out-Houses and Farm-steadings Return Form only details up to house 15. There is no report for houses 16-19.

According to the report there were 35 out buildings listed. They were: 5 stables,10 cow houses,8 piggeries,1 fowl house,2 barns,2 sheds and 7 stores.

The heads of households in Hillpark in 1901 were:

House 1  James Burke

House 2   Catherine Morris

House 3   John Trayers

House 4   Delia Mullin

House 5   Thomas Mullins

House 6   Martin Donnellan

House 8   George Green

House 9   Honoria Finners

House 10  Patrick Jordan

House 11  John Connell

House 12  Owen Donohoe

House 14  Bridget Rooney

House 15  Michael Lynch

House 17  Patrick White

House 18  Patrick Brodrick

House 19  Thomas O Leary

House 1  

James Burke (65) was a farmer living with his wife, Julia Burke (47), who has no occupation and their two children, Thomas P. Burke (24) a farmer’s son and Annetta Burke (16), a scholar. Both children were unmarried. All could read and write. James spoke Irish and English. The rest of the family spoke English only. The Burkes lived in a 1st class house, described in the House and Building Return as a Public House. There were 7 rooms occupied by the family. The house had 7 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 4 out-buildings: a stable, cow house and 2 store rooms.

House 2

Catherine Morris (Cathrin Morris) (80) was the farmer, widowed, living with her daughter-in-law, Marcy Morris( 40 ) also widowed , her unmarried daughter, Maria Morris (40) and her granddaughter, Kitty May Morris (4).Marcy and Maria are both listed as farmer’s daughters and Kitty May has no occupation. The three adults could all read and write. Cathrin and Marcy both spoke English and Irish. Maria and Kitty May spoke English only. The Morrises lived in a 2nd class house. There were 4 rooms occupied by the family. The house had 5 front windows and a roof slate, iron or tiles. There was one out-building: a cow house.

House 3

John Trayers (43), a National School teacher, lived here with his wife, Nora Trayers (39) , no occupation listed, and their  five sons: William Trayers (10),Patrick Trayers (7) ,Denis Trayers (6),John F.Trayers (5) and Michael Trayers (3). The sons were all listed as scholars. The family spoke English and Irish. All the family could read and write except for Michael.

The Trayers family lived in a 2nd class house. There were 4 rooms occupied by the family. The house had 5 front windows and a roof slate, iron or tiles. There were 2 out-buildings: a cow house and a store.

House 4

Delia Mullin  (37) was a merchant ,widowed ,and living with her six children: Owen Mullin ,(12) Bartholomew Mullin (11), Dan Mullin (10),Bridget Mullin (9) Margaret Mullin (8) and Mary Mullin (7), all scholars. Delia, Owen and Bartholomew spoke Irish and English.  The rest of the family spoke English only. All could read and write. The Mullins lived in a 1st class house, described in the House and Building Return as a Public House. There were 8 rooms occupied by the family. The house had 6 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 9 out-buildings: a piggery, a barn, a shed, a fowl house, a stable, cow house and 3 store rooms.

On Census night, there was a visitor in the house, Julia Mullin (32) described as a widowed sister of the head of the household. She could read and write and spoke English only.

There were 7other adults in the house that night. John Duffy (26) and Pat Omeara (19) are described as servants and shop assistants. They both could read and write and spoke English and Irish. They were unmarried. Nora O’Brien (40), a widow and Ellin Egan (24), unmarried, were described as Domestic servants. They both could read and write and spoke English and Irish. Tom Coppinger (65) was described as a servant and coachman. He was unmarried and unable to read. He spoke English and Irish. Michael Connor (20) and Pat McDonagh (22) were described as servants and agricultural labourers. They were unmarried and spoke English and Irish. All were born in Galway.

House 5

Thomas Mullins (45) was a farmer living with his wife Maggie Mullins (33) who has no occupation listed. They both could read and write and spoke English and Irish. The Mullinses had five children, John Mullins (10), Joe Mullins (9), Own Mullins (8), Katie Mullins (7) and Thomas Mullins (5).The children are all listed as scholars. John and Joe spoke Irish and English. The others spoke English only. John, Joe and Own could read and write, Katie could read only and Thomas couldn’t read. Also in the house that night was Pat Kelly (36), a farm servant who was unmarried, deaf and unable to read.

The Mullins family lived in a 2nd class house. There were 7 rooms occupied by the family of 8. The house had 6 front windows and a roof of thatch or wood or other perishable material. There were 3out-buildings: a stable, a piggery and a cow house.

House 6 

Martin Donnellan (60) was a widowed agricultural labourer, living with his unmarried son, James Donnellan (31), also an agricultural labourer and daughter, Ellen Donnellan (13), a scholar. Martin and James could not read and write but Ellen could. Martin Donnellan’s signature is a mark witnessed by the constable. Martin and James spoke Irish and English but Ellen spoke English only. The Donnellans lived in a 1st class house. There were 5 rooms occupied by the family of 3. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There was one out-building: a piggery.

House 7

This house was unoccupied but the landholder was named as Mary Murphy.

House 8

George Green (46), was an unmarried slater living alone. He could read and write and spoke English and Irish. George lived in a 2nd class house, and occupied 3 rooms. The house had 3 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were no out-buildings.

House 9

Honoria Fenner(40), was an unmarried post mistress . She could read and write and spoke English and Irish. Honoria lived in a 2nd class house, described as the Post Office and occupied 3 rooms. The house had 4 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were no out-buildings.

House 10  

Pat Jordan (44) was a publican and general trader, living with his wife, Delia Jordan (32), a housekeeper and their 3 sons, Patrick Jordan(4), John Jordan (3) and James Jordan (2). Patrick and John were described as scholars. Patrick could read only and John couldn’t read. Pat, Delia and Patrick all spoke Irish and English and Pat and Delia could read and write. Present in the house on Census night was Mary Jordan (73), widowed mother of the head of household and a retired housekeeper who could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Also present in the house were two servants: Mary Carrol (24), a general servant and Martin Hynes (22), a farm servant. Both were unmarried, could read and write and spoke Irish and English. All the occupants of the house were from Co. Galway. The Jordans lived in a 2nd class house, described in the House and Building Return as a Public House. There were 5 rooms occupied by the family of 8. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 3 out-buildings: a stable, cow house and a store.

House 11  

John Connell (47) was a carpenter living with his wife, Mary Connell (26), who had no occupation and their son John Connell (6) a scholar. John and Mary could read and write and spoke Irish and English, but their son spoke English and could read only. Also present in the house was a lodger:  John Keane (50), a widower and farm labourer. He is described as speaking English and Irish and not able to read and write. The Connells lived in a 2nd class house. There were 4 rooms occupied by the family of 4. The house had 3 front windows and a roof of thatch or wood or other perishable material. There were 2 out-buildings: a piggery and a cow house.

House 12

Owen Donohoe (54) was a blacksmith living with his wife, Mary Donohoe (50), who had no occupation and their children Annie Donohoe(20) a cook and domestic servant and Michael Donohoe (18), a blacksmith. All could read and write. Owen and Mary spoke Irish and English but their children only spoke English. The Donohoes lived in a 2nd class house. There were 5 rooms occupied by the family of 4. The house had 3 front windows and a roof of thatch or wood or other perishable material. There were 2 out-buildings: a piggery and a cow house.

House 13

This house was unoccupied but house holder was named as Delia Mullin.

House 14

Bridget Rooney (42), an unmarried housekeeper lived here. She could read and write and spoke English and Irish. Bridget lived in a 2nd class house, and occupied 3 rooms. The house had 3 front windows and a roof of thatch or wood or other perishable material. There was one out-building: a piggery.

House 15

Michael Lynch (58), an Asst.Con.Surveyor, was living with his wife Margaret Lynch (46). Michael and Margaret could both read and write and both spoke Irish and English. Michael was born in Co.Clare but all other family members were born in Galway. The couple had 9 children all present in the house on the night of the census. They are listed as: Mary Lynch (22), Rosie Lynch (18), Patk Lynch (16), Angela Lynch (13),Margaret Lynch (11),Thomas Lynch (10), Anne Lynch (8), James Lynch (6) and Josie Lynch (5).All the children could read and write and Mary, Rosie, Patk and Angela spoke Irish and English. The other children spoke English only. Mary and Rosie were unmarried and have no occupations listed and all the other children were scholars. The Lynchs lived in a 2nd class house. There were 7 rooms occupied by the family of 9. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 5 out-buildings: a stable, a piggery, a cow house, a barn and a shed.

House 16

This house was unoccupied but the house holder was named as Michael Lynch.

House 17

Patrick White (31) a labourer, lived here with his wife, Anne White (22), no occupation given and daughter Mary White (8). Patrick spoke Irish and English but could not read or write. His signature is a mark witnessed by the constable.  Anne spoke only English and could neither read nor write either. Mary is listed as a scholar who spoke English only and could read only. The Whites lived in a 3rd class house. (This was the only 3rd Class house in Hillpark at the time.) There were 2 rooms occupied by the family of 3.  The house had 1 front window and a roof of thatch or wood or other perishable material.  There were no out-buildings.

House 18

Patrick Brodrick (Broderick) (36) was a general labourer. He lived with his wife Mary Brodrick (30) and their children Mary B.Brodrick (12), Pat Brodrick (10) and Michael Brodrick (5).Mary has no occupation listed and the children were listed as scholars. All the family could read and write except for Michael who could only read.  Patrick spoke English and Irish. The rest of the family spoke English only. The Brodricks lived in a 3rd class house with 4 rooms occupied by the family of 5. The house had 2 front windows and a roof of thatch or wood or other perishable material. There was one out-building. (There is no listing for this house in the Out Offices and Farm Steadings Return for this townland.)

House 19 

Thomas O’Leary /Thomas Leary (62) who was described as a married Householder, was in this house on Census night with his two sons, James O’Leary (14) and Stephen O’Leary (12), both scholars. All could read and write and all spoke Irish and English. The O’Learys lived in a 2nd class house with 6 rooms occupied by the family of 4. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 2 out-buildings. (There is no listing for this house in the Out Offices and Farm Steadings Return for this townland.)

The 1911 Census.

The census was taken on Sunday 2nd April 1911.

There is no townland of Hillpark listed in the 1911 Census. The townland is now called Clarinbridge.

According to the Enumerator’s report,all residents were Roman Catholic. 129 people lived in the townland, of whom 58 were male and 71 were female.

The majority were born in County Galway. Others were born in the following counties:

Clare (6), Westmeath (3), Tipperary (1), Limerick,(1) Cork,(1), Dublin (1), Kildare(1).

According to the House and Building Return form ,all 35 buildings were completed (built) and inhabited .As well as private dwellings they include 2 public houses, a post office, a convent, a national school, an R.C. chapel, a convent chapel and a convent national school. In all cases the walls were made of stone, brick or concrete. 24 houses were listed as being roofed with slate, iron or tiles and 7 had a roof of thatch, wood or other perishable materials. 3 dwellings were listed as 1st class, 2 of these were Public Houses and one was the convent. 3 houses were described as 3rd Class and 27 as 2nd class. The national school, R.C. chapel, convent chapel and convent national school are not described. All houses are described as,”Unallotted”.

The Out-Offices and Farm-Steadings Report form listed 101 out-offices and farm-steadings in total but inspection of the forms show there were 107 .These were: 13(14) stables, 5(6) coach houses, 2 harness rooms, 12 (13)cow houses, 6  calf houses,3(4) dairies, 22 (23) piggeries, 12 (13)fowl houses, 2 barns, 9(10)turf houses, 2 potato houses,2 workshops,1 shed,7 stores and 2 forges and 1 laundry.

 The heads of households in Clarinbridge in the 1911 Census were:

SurnameForename
MullinDelia
EganJames
O’ ShaughnesyMalachy
LynchMichael
RoonoeBridget
WhitePatrick
FlemingMichael
KennedyBridget
MorrisMary
BrodrickPatrick
CorlessPatrick
FordeTobias
LearyJames
DonnellanMartin
KeaneJames
MahonJohn
O’HalloranPatrick
O BourkeBridget
ClarkeWinnie
BurkeJames
DonohoeOwen
HawkinsMichael
MullinJohn
FinnerNora
ConnellJohn
MurphyJohn
GrealyMark
SullyMichael J
GreenGeorge

Patrick Jordan and Susan Coffy were omitted from this list.

House 1

James Burke (77) described himself as, “a retired grocer etc” living with his wife, Delia Burke (59), a shopkeeper. The couple had been married 41 years. Both could read and write and both spoke Irish and English. The couple had 5 children all of whom were still living. One son, Thomas Pat Burke (34), a farmer,  a daughter-in- law, Margaret Burke (29),and a grandson Joseph Burke(under 8 months) were present on the night of the census. Thomas and Margaret both spoke English only and could read and write. The couple had been married for 2 years and had 1 child. Also present in the house was Katherine Deviney (19), a domestic servant who was single and could read and write and spoke Irish and English. The Burkes lived in a 1st class house, described as a Public House with 9 rooms occupied by the family of 6. The house had 9 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 8 out-buildings: 1 stable, 1 coach house, 1 cow house,1 calf house,1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 turf house and 1 store.

House 2

Mary Morris (50) was a widowed farmer, living with 1 daughter, Kathleen Morris (14) and 1 single, female relative Marie Morris (48). Information on number of years of marriage, children born to the marriage and children living was not completed. Also living in the house were 2 female boarders, Maria Gannon (15) and Emily McGeown (10). All the occupants could read and write and were described as scholars except for Marie Morris who had no occupation. All spoke English only. The Morrises lived in a 2nd class house, with 6 rooms occupied by the family of 5. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 3 out-buildings: 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

House 3

Delia Mullin (49) was a widowed merchant, living with 2 sons, Owen Mullin (22), a shopkeeper and Joseph Mullin (25), a book keeper and 1 daughter, Bridget Mullin (19). Also in the house were 2 shop assistants, Denis Lennon (19) and Thomas Fleming (18) and 1 servant, Margaret Killian (22). The other occupants could read and write and all were single. All spoke English only. Information on number of years of marriage, children born to the marriage and children living was not completed. The Mullinses lived in a 1st class house, described as a Public house with 11 rooms occupied by the family of 7. The house had 7 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 11 out-buildings: 1 stable, 1 coach house,1 harness room, 1 cow house,1 dairy.1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 turf house and 3 stores.

House 4

John Mullin (20) was a farmer living with his sister, Katie Mullin (16) and his 2 brothers, Owen Mullin (18) and Thomas Mullin (12).  All could read and write and all spoke English only except Owen who spoke Irish and English. Owen is described as a farmer’s brother and Thomas as a scholar. Katie had no occupation. They were all unmarried. The Mullins lived in a 2nd class house with 7 rooms occupied by the family of 4. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of thatch or wood. There were 3 out-buildings: a stable, a piggery and a fowl house.

House 5

John Murphy (40) was a farmer living with his wife Anne Murphy (27). The couple had been married 3 years and had had no children. Both could read and write and both spoke Irish and English. Also present in the house was Rev.Fr Patrick Davoren (43), a boarder. He was a Catholic curate who was single and could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  The Murphys lived in a 2nd class house with 6 rooms occupied by the family of 6. The house had 3 front windows and a roof of thatch or wood. There were 3 out-buildings: a stable, a piggery and a calf house.

House 6

James Leary (22) was a single man whose occupation was a caretaker. He lived alone. James could read and write and spoke English only. James lived in a 2nd class house with 7 rooms occupied by the family of 1. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There was 1 out-building: a stable.

House 7

Nora Finner (65) was a post mistress who was unmarried. Nora could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Also present in the house was John J Savage (33), a boarder. He was a National School teacher who was single and could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Nora Finner lived in a 2nd class house described as the Post Office. There were 5 rooms occupied by the family of 2. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were no out-buildings.

House 8

Patrick Jordan (53) was a licensed publican, living with his wife Delia Jordan (46). The couple had been married 17 years and had 7 children of whom 6 were still living. Both could read and write and both spoke Irish and English. Present in the house on the night of the census were all 6 of their children. Patrick Jordan (14), John Jordan (13), James Jordan (12), Thomas Jordan (10), Margaret Jordan (6) and Mary Jordan (4). These were all scholars except for Mary. They all could read and write except Mary who could read only. The 4 boys all spoke Irish and English but the 2 girls spoke English only. Present in the house was Patrick’s mother, Mary Jordan (85), a widow, who could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Also in the house was 1 shop assistant, Margret Santly (22), who was single, could read and write and spoke Irish and English. The Jordans lived in a 2nd class house, described as a Public house with 8 rooms occupied by the family of 10. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 7 out-buildings: 1 stable, 1 cow house,1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 potato house, 1 turf house and 1 store.

House 9

John Connell (70) was a carpenter living with his wife Mary Connell (32). The couple had been married 11 years and had 7 children of whom 4 were still living. Both could read and write and both spoke Irish and English. They lived with their 4 children, John Connell (16), Mary Ellin Connell (9), Eliza Connell (6) and Denis Connell (3).  John Connell was an apprentice, single and could read and write but spoke English only. The 2 girls were scholars who could read and write and also spoke English only. The Connells lived in a 2nd class house with 6 rooms occupied by the family of 6. The house had 3 front windows and a roof of thatch or wood. There were 2 out-buildings: a stable and a cow house.

House 10

James Egan (48) was a farmer living with his wife Kate Egan (47). The couple had been married 8 years. The couple had 2 children, one son, John Egan (5) who was in the house on the night of the census and one child who had died. James’s sister-in-law, Mary O’Hara (58), lived with them. All could read and write except the child, John. All spoke Irish and English. The Egans lived in a 2nd class house with 4 rooms occupied by the family of 4. The house had 3 front windows and a roof of thatch or wood. There were 2 out-buildings: a cow house and a piggery.

House 11

Owen Donohoe (68) was a blacksmith living with his wife, Mary Donohoe (72), who is described as, “a housekeeper at home.” The couple had been married 40 years. Both could read and write and both spoke Irish and English. The couple had 6 children all of whom were still living. The Donohoes lived in a 2nd class house, with 5 rooms occupied by the family of 2. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There was 1 out-building: a forge.

House 12

Martin Donnellan (73) was a widowed labourer. Information on number of years of marriage, children born to the marriage and children living children was not completed. Martin could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Present on the night of the census were his son, James Donnellan (44) also a widower and 3 of his grandchildren, Martin Donnellan (13),Sarah Donnellan(8,) and Katherine Donnellan (6).  James Donnellan was also a labourer and could read and write but spoke English only. The children were all described as scholars. Martin could read but the other two could not. The Donnellans lived in a 2nd class house with 4 rooms occupied by the family of 5. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 2 out-buildings: a barn and a piggery.

House 13

Patrick Brodrick (Broderick) (55) was a labourer living with his wife, Mary Brodrick (45). The couple had been married 26 years and had 8 children of whom 3 were still living. Both could read and write and both spoke Irish and English. One son, Patrick Brodrick (22), described as a labourer’s son was present on the night of the census. He spoke English only and could also read and write. The Brodricks lived in a 2nd class house with 4 rooms occupied by the family of 3. The house had 3 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 2 out-buildings: a piggery and a turf house.

House 14

Michael Lynch (72) was an AC Surveyor living with his wife, Maggie Lynch (56). The couple had been married 32 years. The couple had 13 children, of whom 8 were living. Both could read and write and both spoke Irish and English. Present on the night of the census were 2 of their sons, Michael Lynch (30) and Thomas Lynch (20) and 2 of their daughters, Maggie Corcoran (21), a married woman and Annie Lynch (18). Also present was 1 granddaughter, Minnie Grealy (5), a scholar. All could read and write except the child, Minnie. All spoke English only. The Lynchs lived in a 2nd class house with 5 rooms occupied by the family of 7. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 6 out-buildings: a stable, a coach house, a cow house, 2 calf houses and a piggery.

House 15

Patrick O’Halloran (73) was a tailor living with his wife, Nora O’Halloran (63). The couple had been married 20 years and had 2 children, both of whom were still living. Both could read and write and both spoke Irish and English. Their 2 sons Henry O’Halloran (18), and John O’Halloran (16), were present on the night of the census. Henry is described as a tailor’s apprentice and John as a scholar. They were single, spoke English only and could read and write. Also present in the house was Mary O’Brien (15) a domestic servant who was single and could read and write and spoke English only. The O’Hallorans lived in a 2nd class house with 8 rooms occupied by the family of 5. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 3 out-buildings: a stable, a piggery and a cow house.

House 16

Malachy O’Shaughnesy (61) was a labourer living with his wife, Bridget O’Shaughnesy (60). The couple had been married 32 years. Information on number of years of marriage, children born to the marriage and children living was not completed. Malachy could read and write but Bridget could not. Both spoke Irish and English. The O’Shaughnesys lived in a 2nd class house with 5 rooms occupied by the family of 2. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 2 out-buildings: a cow house and a piggery.

House 17

James Keane (55) was a widowed labourer. The boxes requesting the number of years of his marriage and the children born to the marriage and those still living were not completed. James could not read or write and both spoke Irish and English. Present on the night of the census were 2 of his sons and 1 unmarried daughter, Norah Keane (20) who has no occupation but could read and write and spoke English only. The 2 sons, Denny Keane (24) and John Keane (18) were described as labourers who could read and write and were unmarried. They spoke English only. Also present in the house was James’s mother-in-law, Mary Connell (70), a widower with no occupation. She spoke Irish and English and could read only. The Keanes lived in a 2nd class house with 5 rooms occupied by the family of 5. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 2 out-buildings: a piggery and a fowl house.

House 18

Mark Grealy (40) was a labourer living with his wife, Mary Grealy (30).The couple had been married 12 years. The couple had 4 children, all of whom were living. Both could read and write and both spoke Irish and English. Present on the night of the census were their 4 children Martin Joe Grealy (6), a labourer’s son, Essie Grealy (11), a scholar Mary Grealy (3), and Michael Grealy (1). All could not read. Present in the house was Mark’s mother, Mary Grealy (71), a widow who could not read or write and spoke Irish and English. Also present in the house was Anne Walsh (70), a boarder. She was a single woman of no occupation and could not read or write and spoke Irish only. The Grealys lived in a 2nd class house with 4 rooms occupied by the family of 8. The house had 3 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 2 out-buildings: a turf house and a piggery.

House 19

Patrick Corless (71) was a blacksmith living with his wife, Cecelia Corless (73). The couple had been married 42 years and had 7 children of whom 4 were still living. Both could read and write and both spoke Irish and English. One son, Patrick Corless (32), also a blacksmith was present on the night of the census. He was single. He also spoke Irish and English and could read and write. The Corlesses lived in a 2nd class house with 4 rooms occupied by the family of 3. The house had 3 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 2 out-buildings: a piggery and a turf house.

House 20

Bridget O’Bourke (70) was a widow whose occupation was a dressmaker. Information on number of years of marriage, children born to the marriage and children living was not completed. She lived alone. Bridget could read and write and spoke only Irish. Bridget O’Bourke lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms occupied by the family of 1. The house had 3 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There was 2 out-building: a piggery and a workshop.

House 21

Bridget Roonoe (56) was a single woman whose occupation was a Parish Clerk. She lived alone. Bridget could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Bridget Roonoe lived in a 3rd class house with 4 rooms occupied by the family of 1. The house had 2 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There was 1 out-building: a piggery.

House 22

Winnie Clarke (72) was a single woman who described herself as having no trade or employment and living on a pension. She lived alone. Winnie could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Winnie Clarke lived in a 2nd class house with 4 rooms occupied by the family of 1. The house had 2 front windows and a roof of thatch or wood. There was 1 out-building: a fowl house.

House 23

Patrick White (46) was a labourer living with his wife, Anne White (35). The couple had been married 12 years. Neither could read nor write. Patrick spoke Irish and English. Anne spoke English only.  The form states the couple had 3 living children but there are 4 of their children listed as present on the night of the census. Willie White (14), James White (8),Patrick White(5)and  Bridget White(2).The 3 boys are described as scholars who couldn’t read and Willie could read only. All spoke English only. The Whites lived in a 3rd class house with 3 rooms occupied by the family of 6. The house had 1 front window and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There was 1 out-building: a piggery.

House 24

Tobias Forde (30) was a married man whose occupation is listed as tailor. He was born in Co.Limerick and he lived alone. Information on number of years of marriage, children born to the marriage and children living was not completed.  Tobias could read and write and spoke English only. Tobias lived in a 3rd class house with 4 rooms occupied by the family of 1. The house had 2 front windows and a roof of thatch or wood. There was 1 out-building: a piggery.

House 25

Michael J. Sully (51) (sic) was the Parish Priest of Kilcornan. (On the Household and Building Return he was named Rev’d Father Michael J. Tully P.P.) He was born in County Clare. He could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Present in the house was Ellen Greene (34).Her relationship to him is housekeeper. She was single and could read and write and spoke English only. Her occupation was cook and domestic servant. Also present in the house was Mary Ellen Moran (24), a visitor. She was a single woman of no occupation who could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Both women were born in County Clare. Michael J.Sully lived in a 2nd class house. There were 8 rooms occupied by the family of 3. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There was 7 out-buildings( The enumerator totalled this to 1.): 1 coach house,1 stable,1 cowhouse,1 dairy,1 piggery,1 fowl house and 1 turf house.

House 26

Michael Fleming (44) was a mason living with his wife, Elizabeth Fleming (44).  The couple had been married 19 years. The couple had 9 children, all of whom were living. Both could read and write and both spoke Irish and English. Present on the night of the census were 5 of their son and 3 of their daughters. The 2 oldest sons, Patrick Fleming (17) and George Fleming (16) were described as masons who could read and write and were unmarried. Patrick spoke Irish and English and George spoke English only. The other children were Michael Fleming / (Michl Fleming) (15), Joseph Fleming (12), John Fleming (11), Mary Fleming (11), Katie Fleming (8), Elizabeth Fleming (4). All spoke English only except Joseph who also spoke Irish. The Flemings lived in a 2nd class house with 7 rooms occupied by the family of 10. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 3 out-buildings: a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house.

House 27

John Mahon (36) was a single farmer who could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Present on the night of the census were his unmarried sister, Bridget Mahon (49), a single woman, and his widowed mother, Mary Keane (75). Both could read and write and spoke Irish and English and had no occupations. The boxes requesting the number of years of marriage and the children born to the marriage of Mary Keane and those still living were not completed. The Mahons lived in a 2nd class house with 5 rooms occupied by the family of 3. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 3 out-buildings: a stable, a piggery and a cow house.

House 28

Michael Hawkins (62) was a labourer living with his wife, Mary Hawkins (40), a housekeeper. The couple had been married 16 years. Both could read and write and both spoke English only. The couple had had no children. Also present in the house was Johanna Dwyer (20), a boarder. She was a National School teacher who was single and could read and write and spoke English only. The Hawkinses lived in a 2nd class house, with 8 rooms occupied by the family of 3. The house had 4 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There was 1 out-building, a barn.

House 29

Sister Susan Coffy (55), born in Co.Westmeath, was the Reverend Mother and head of the household for the convent. She could read and write and spoke English only. Present in the convent on the night of the census were 9 Sisters of Charity: Mary Butler (52), born in Tipperary, Helen Hearty (54), born in Limerick, Margaret Carroll (52), born in Tipperary, Anne Lynch (37), born in Cork, Selenia Mc Sweeney(35), born in Dublin, Bridget Creavy(72), born in Westmeath, Angela Cohill (60), born in Galway, Mary Dowling(56), born in Kildare and Julia Hagan(41), born in Westmeath. All could read and write and all spoke English only except Angela Cohill who spoke Irish and English. The convent was a 1st Class house with 18 rooms occupied by 10 people. The house had 7 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 18 out-buildings: 1 stable, 1 coach house,1 harness room, 1 cow house,1 calf house, 1 dairy, 5 fowl houses, 1 potato house,1 turf house,1workshop,1 shed, 2 stores and 1 laundry.

House 30

Bridget Kennedy (49) was a single woman whose occupation is listed as house keeper. She lived alone. Bridget could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Bridget Kennedy lived in a 2nd class house with 4 rooms occupied by the family of 1. The house had 2 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There was 1 out-building: a turf house.

House 31

George Green (56) was a slater who was single and lived alone. George could read and write and spoke Irish and English. George Green lived in a 2nd class house with 4 rooms occupied by the family of 1. The house had 2 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 2 out-buildings: a piggery and a turf house.

This page was added on 14/03/2017.

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