Slievaun / Slieveaun

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The townland name is:

Slieveaun 

The Gaelic (Irish) form of the name is:

Slia bán (Small mountain.)

Slievaun/Slieveaun is in County Galway. It is in the Barony of Dunkellin and in the Civil Parish of Stradbally. It is in the District Electoral Division of Clarenbridge.

Other Forms of the Name with authority source (if provided) in italics are:

Sliaveaun ,Slia bán ,Slievaun (Clerk of the Peace) ,Slevane (County Registry 1820 )
Sleevane  (County Registry 1820) ,Slievaun (High Constable for the Barony),
Slievaun (Sketch Map),Slievaun (Tithe Composition Book) ,Slievaun (1901 Census)

Slieveaun( 1911 Census).

Information from O’Donovan’s Field Name Books

Description: 

The proprietor of Slievaun was Mr. Redington of Kilcornan. The townland of Slievaun was let to tenants at will. Rent paid was from 10 to 20 shillings per acre. It was occupied by 12 farmers and 1 cotter. All were Roman Catholics. The soil was light clay mixed with gravel. It was in general very rocky. The soil produced good potatoes and oats with some wheat. The houses were stone and of inferior construction. The inhabitants were very poor. Clarin Village was situated at the cross roads southwest of townland.

Situation:

Slievaun was west of the parish. It was bounded on the north and east by Gurtard/Gortard, on the south by Kilcornan and on the west by Hill Park and part of the parish of Ballynacoortia/Ballynacourty.

Information from Griffith’s Valuation (1855)

According to Griffiths Valuation of 1855, Slievaun covered an area of 185 acres, 0 roods and 29 perches.

The land was valued at: £89 3s and 1d.

Building value was: £31 7s and 0d.

Total value was: £104 15s and 1d.

Top of Form

Bottom of Form

Stephen Davis rented land of  0 acres 3 roods and 33 perches from Sir Thomas N. Redington with an annual valuation of  £ 0 8s 0d  .

Owen Mullins rented land of 0 acres 3 roods and 33 perches from Sir Thomas N. Redington, with an annual valuation of £0 8s 0d.

James Donnellan rented land of 0 acres  1 rood  and  21 perches from Sir Thomas N. Redington with an annual valuation of £0 3s 0d.

Patrick Corles rented land of 1 acre 0 roods and 33 perches from Sir Thomas N. Redington with an annual valuation of £0 10s 0d.

Malachy Shaughnessy rented a house and land of 3 acres  3 roods 28 perches from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of £1 10s 0d for land and £0 15s 0d for buildings making a total annual valuation of £ 2 5s 0d.

John Corcoran rented a house and garden of 0 acres 1 rood and 25 perches from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of £0 3s 0d for land and £0 7s 0d for buildings making a total annual valuation of £0 10s 0d.

Thomas Linskey rented a house and land of 2 acres 2 roods and  28 perches from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of £0 10s 0d for land and £0 10s 0d for buildings  making a total annual valuation of £ 0 20s 0d.

Patrick Whelan, Patrick Burke, Michael Donohoe, James Burke and Michael Connors

rented land of 59 acres 2 roods and 16 perches from Sir Thomas N.Redington. Michael Connors paid a valuation of £ 3 0s 0d and each of the others paid a valuation of £ 1 10s 0d making a total annual valuation of £ 7 40s 0d.

Michael Connors rented a house, office , yard  and garden of 5 acres  1 rood and  0 perches from  Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of £ 3 0s 0d for land and £0 10s 0d for buildings making a total annual valuation of £  3 10s 0d.

John Corcoran rented land of  7 acres  2 roods and  17 perches from  Sir Thomas N. Redington with an annual valuation of £ 2 5s 0d .

James Donnellan rented 3 acres 1 rood and 38 perches of land from Sir Thomas N. Redington with an annual valuation of £ 1 5s 0d.

Sir Thomas N. Redington KCB had land in fee of 60 acres 0 roods and 18 perches with a valuation of £31 0s 0d and a plantation of 5 acres,3 roods and 20 perches with a valuation of  £1 5s 0d making a total annual valuation of £32 5s 0d.

James Carr  rented a house and yard of unrecorded size from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a total annual valuation of £  3 5s 0d. .

Guardians of the Poor of the Galway Union, rented a dispensary, office and small garden  of  unrecorded size from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a total annual valuation of £2 15s 0d. Half of the annual rent, a valuation of £3, was paid by Sir Thomas N. Redington KCB.  

William Morris rented a house, office and small garden of unrecorded size from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a total annual valuation of £2 10s 0d.

James Conroy rented a house and small garden from Sir Thomas N. Redington of unrecorded size, with an annual valuation of £2 5s 0d.

Superior of Monastery rented house, office and garden of 0 acres,1 rood and 20 perches from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of £0 10s 0d for land and £7 0s 0d for buildings, making a total annual valuation of £7 10s 0d  .

Superior of Monastery also rented a school-house and office of unrecorded size from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a total annual valuation of £13 0s 0d.

Patrick Corles rented a house and garden of 10 perches from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of £0 2s 0d for land and£3 3s 0d for buildings making a total annual valuation of £3 5s 0d.

Patrick Byrne rented tolls and customs of fairs from Sir Thomas N. Redington with an annual valuation of £12 0s 0d

William Burke rented land of 2 acres 3 roods and 10 perches from Sir Thomas N. Redington with an annual valuation of £1 10s 0d

Patrick Connor rented a house and land of  4 acres  2 roods and 37 perches from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of £2 10s 0d for land and £0 10s 0d for buildings making an annual valuation of £3 0s 0d.

Michael Egan rented a house and land of 3 acres 2 roods and  23 perches from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of £2 3s 0d for land and £0 7s 0d for building  making a total annual valuation of £ 2 10s 0d.

Malachy Shaughnessy rented land of 3 acres  2 roods and 30 perches from  Sir Thomas Redington with a total annual valuation of £2 0s 0d.

Mary Gormly rented a house and garden of 0 acres  3roods and  10 perches from  Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of £ 0 10s 0d for land and £0 2s 0d for buildings  making a total annual valuation of £0 12s 0d.

Martin Moran rented a house, office and land of 4 acres 2 roods and 34 perches from Sir Thomas N. Redington with a valuation of £2 10s 0d for land and £0 5s 0d for buildings  making a total annual valuation of £ 2 15s 0d.

Patrick Byrne rented land of 12  acres 2 roods and 4 perches from  Sir Thomas Redington with a total annual valuation of £7 0s 0d.

The 1901 Census.

The census was taken on Sunday 31st March 1901. According to the House & Building Return there were 13 buildings in Slievaun. These were 13 dwellings.12 of these were inhabited.1 was unoccupied. All the houses were completed (built). In all cases the walls were made of stone, brick or concrete. 4 of the houses had roofs of thatch, wood or other perishable material and 8 had roofs of slate iron or tiles. 10 were 2nd class houses and 3 were 3rd class houses.

According to the House and Building Return form there was one family per dwelling except House 2 which had 2 families. Anne Redington was listed as the land owner for 8 of the houses. The following heads of household owned their own houses: Mary Silk, John Connors, Bridget Connors and James Burke. Margaret Corcoran’s house was owned by William Corcoran.

According to the Enumerator’s Abstract form, 42 people lived in the townland, of whom 20 were male and  22 female. All residents were Roman Catholic and all were born in County Galway except for Father Patrick McDonagh who was born in Co.Clare and 2 boarders in his house who were born in Co.Louth.

The Out-Offices and Farm Steadings Return form listed 17 out-offices and farm-steadings in total. These were: 1 stable, 11 cow houses, 4 piggeries, and 1barn.

The Heads of Household in Slievaun in the 1901 Census were:

Margaret Corcoran

Thomas Laine

John Connors

Michael Fleming

Margaret Molloy

Patrick Corless

Bridget O’Rorke

Alicia Moylan

Mary Silke

Patrick McDonagh

Patrick O’Halloran

James Keane

House 1

Patrick O’Halloran (50) was a tailor living with his wife, Honoria O’Halloran (40), who has no occupation and their 4 children, Margaret O’Halloran (15), Josephine O’Halloran (14), Henry O’Halloran (8) and John O’Halloran (3.) All the children were scholars and all could read and write except for the youngest, John. Patrick and Honoria could both read and write and spoke Irish and English. The two older children spoke Irish and English and the younger two spoke English only. Also present in the house was a boarder, Michael Dean (20), an unmarried tailor who could read and write and spoke English only. The O’Hallorans lived in a 2nd class house, whose landholder was Anne Redington. There were 8 rooms occupied by the family of 7. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There was 1 out-building: a cow house.

House 2

James Keane (50) was an agricultural labourer living with his wife, Honor Keane (40), a dressmaker and their 2 children, Nora Keane (11) and John Keane (10). James Keane could not read or write and spoke Irish and English. Honor Keane could read and write and spoke Irish and English. The two children were scholars who could read and write and spoke English only. The Keanes lived in a 2nd class house, whose landholder was Anne Redington. There were 2 rooms occupied by the family of 4. The house had 2 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were no out-buildings.

House -2a

Alicia Moylan (54) was a widowed seamstress living with her unmarried daughter, Jane Moylan, (25) also a seamstress. They could both read and write and both spoke English only. Alicia Moylan lived in a 2nd class house whose landholder was Anne Redington.  The house had 3 rooms occupied by the family of 2. The house had 2 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There was 1 out-building:

House 3

Michael Fleming (34) was a builder living with his wife, Lizzie Fleming(34), who has no occupation and their 5 children, Thomas Fleming(8),George Fleming(5), Joseph Fleming(2),John Fleming (1) and Mary Fleming(1),all listed as scholars. Michael and Lizzie spoke Irish and English. The rest of the family spoke English only. Michael, Lizzie and their eldest son, Thomas could read and write. Also present in the house was, Annie Riley (14), a servant, who spoke Irish and English, was unmarried and could not read or write.

The Flemings lived in a 2nd class house, whose landholder was Anne Redington. There were 5 rooms occupied by the family of 8. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 2 out-buildings: a cow house and a piggery.

House 4

Bridget O’Rorke (48) was a widowed dressmaker, living alone. She could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Bridget O’Rorke lived in a 2nd class house whose landholder was Anne Redington .The house had 3 rooms occupied by the family of 1. The house had 3 front windows and a roof of thatch or wood. There were 2 out-buildings: a cow house and a piggery.

House 5

Thomas Laine/Lane (60) was an agricultural labourer living with his wife, Honor Laine (50), who has no occupation and their 4 children, John Laine(27),Margaret Laine(24), Michael Laine(22) and Thomas Laine (20.) All the children were single. All 3 young men were also agricultural labourers and the daughter had no occupation. Thomas Laine could not read or write but all the other family members could. Thomas, Honor and John spoke Irish and English. The rest of the family spoke English only. The Laines lived in a 2nd class house, whose landholder was Anne Redington. There were 3 rooms occupied by the family of 6. The house had 3 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There was 1 out-building: a cow house.

House 6

Margaret Molloy (72) was a widowed agrriculturist(sic) living with her unmarried daughter, Mary Molloy,(32) an assistant. They could both read and write and both spoke Irish and English. Margaret Molloy lived in a 2nd class house whose landholder was Anne Redington.  The house had 4 rooms occupied by the family of 2. The house had 2 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There was 1 out-building: a cow house

House 7

Patrick Corless (59) was a blacksmith living with his wife, Cecelia Corless(60), a seamstress and their son, Patrick Corless(21),an assistant blacksmith. Patrick and Cecelia could read only and spoke Irish and English. Patrick (Junior) was unmarried, could read and write and spoke Irish and English. The Corlesses lived in a 2nd class house, whose landholder was Anne Redington. There were 4 rooms occupied by the family of 3. The house had 3 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 2 out-buildings: a cow house and a piggery.

House 8

Mary Silke (70) was a widowed landholder living with her unmarried niece, Mary Joe Leary (19), a seamstress and a boarder, Catherine Lowery,(70) a widowed seamstress.  Mary Silke and Catherine Lowery could both read and write and spoke English only. Mary Joe Leary could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Mary Silke lived in a 2nd class house which she owned herself. The house had 7 rooms occupied by the family of 3. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 3 out-buildings: a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 9

Patrick McDonagh (67) was a Roman Catholic parish priest who could read and write and spoke Irish and English. He was born in County Clare. Also present in the house were 2 boarders: Edward Johnston (70),a Roman Catholic clergyman and Joseph Johnston(63) an unmarried private gentleman, both born in County Louth. These 2 men could both read and write and spoke English only. There were 2 unmarried domestic servants in the house also: Winifred Clarke (60) and Bridget Connell (19), both of whom could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Patrick McDonagh lived in a 2nd class house whose landholder was Anne Redington.   The house had 8 rooms occupied by the family of 5. The house had 5 front windows and a roof of slate, iron or tiles. There were 2 out-buildings: a stable and a cow house.

House 10

Margaret Corcoran (60) was a single woman of no occupation, living alone. She could not read or write and spoke Irish and English. Margaret Corcoran lived in a 2nd class house whose landholder was William Corcoran. The house had 3 rooms occupied by the family of 1. The house had 3 front windows and a roof of thatch or wood. There was 1 out-building: a cow house.

House 11

Bridget Connors (52) was a widowed farmer living with her unmarried daughter, Mary Connors,(21) a farmer’s daughter. They could both read and write and both spoke Irish and English. Bridget Connors lived in a 3rd class house which she owned herself.  The house had 3 rooms occupied by the family of 2. The house had 2 front windows and a roof of thatch or wood. There was 1 out-building: a cow house.

House12

John Connors/Connor (34) was a farmer living with his wife, Bridget Connors (37), who has no occupation. They had no children documented in the house on that night. Both could read and write and both spoke Irish and English. Also present in the house was John’s mother, Mary Connors (67), a widow who spoke Irish and English but could not read or write. The Connors lived in a 3rd class house, whose landholder was Anne Redington. There were 2 rooms occupied by the family of 3. The house had 2 front windows and a roof of thatch or wood. There was 1 out-building: a cow house.

House 13 (John Burke)

House 13 was unoccupied. It was owned by John Burke. It was a3rd class house with a roof of thatch or wood, 2 front windows and no out-buildings.

The 1911 Census.

The census was taken on Sunday 2nd April 1911.

There is no townland of Slievaun listed in the 1911 Census. The townland is now called Slieveaun.

According to the House & Building Return there were 3 buildings in Slieveaun .All buildings were completed (built) and inhabited .All 3 were private dwellings. In all cases the walls were made of stone, brick or concrete. All 3 had a roof of thatch, wood or other perishable materials. 1 dwelling was listed as 2nd class and 2 houses were described as 3rd Class.

2 heads of household, Robert Corbett and John Connors owned their houses but Katherine M. Deely’s house was owned by James Burke of Clarenbridge. All residents were Roman Catholic.

According to the Enumerator’s abstract form,11 people lived in the townland, of whom 4 were male and 7 were female.

10 residents were born in County Galway and Robert Corbett was born in Co.Donegal.

The Out-Offices and Farm Steadings Return form listed 8 out-offices and farm-steadings in total. These were: 1 stable, 2 cow houses,3 piggeries, and 2 fowl houses.

The Heads of Household in Slieveaun in the 1911 Census were:

 Katherine M. Deely

John Connors      

Robert Corbett      

House 1

Robert Corbett (40) was a farmer born in Co.Donegal, living with his wife, Mary Corbett (33). The couple had been married 7 years. Both could read and write and both spoke Irish and English. The couple had 4 children, Thomas Michael Corbett (6), Bridget May Corbett (5), Charlotte Corbett (4) and Mary Elizabeth Corbett (2).The elder 2 children were scholars and could read and write. All spoke English only. Also present in the house was Robert Corbett’s mother-in-law, Bridget Connors (78). Bridget Connors was a widow who could not read and spoke English and Irish. The boxes requesting the number of years of her marriage and the children born to the marriage and those still living were not completed. The Corbetts lived in a 2nd class house, with 4 rooms occupied by the family of 7. The house had 3 front windows and a roof of thatch or wood. There was 4 out-building, a stable, cow house, piggery and fowl house.

House 2

Katherine M. Deely(54) was a single farmer, living alone. She could read only and spoke only English. Katherine M.Deely lived in a 3rd class house whose landholder was James Burke of Clarinbridge. The house had with 3 rooms occupied by the family of 1. The house had 2 front windows and a roof of thatch or wood. There were 2 out-buildings: a piggery and a fowl house.

House 3

John Connors (46) was a farmer living with his wife, Bridget Connors (49).The couple had been married 11 years. Both could read and write and both spoke Irish and English. The couple had one child, John Connors (9), a scholar, who could read and write and spoke English only. The Connors lived in a 3rd class house, with 3 rooms occupied by the family of 3. The house had 2 front windows and a roof of thatch or wood. There were 2 out-buildings, a cow house and a piggery.

This page was added on 14/03/2017.

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