Barnacragh

Barnacragh

Roger Harrison

Barnacragh / Barnacragh                                                    Iriish Grid: M 81167 28628

 

DED: Ballinasloe Rural

 

Description:

(John O’Donovan 1806-1861)

This townland contains 57 acres, 2 roods and 4 perches all under cultivation except about 3 acres of bog in the west extremity, houses and roads in good repair. It is the property of the Earl Clancarty held by deed for ever. Pays £4.14.0 County Cess including Corragh.

 

Situation:

(John O’Donovan 1806-1861)

Lies at the southern boundary of the parish, is bounded by Corragh, Loughbound and Lisscoppan in this parish and by Urraghree in the parish of Clontooskert and Barony of Cloonmacnoon.

 

This is a list of townlands that share a border with Barnacragh.

 

 

 

Census of Ireland (1821- 1911)

The first full population census of Ireland was taken in 1821 and the first four Irish censuses were arranged by county, barony, civil parish and townland.

 

1821:  Only some fragments for small parts of county Galway survive. There are no records      for Kilcloony.

1831:  The only surviving records are from Counties Antrim and Derry.

1841:  There are no surviving records for County Galway.

1851:   There are no surviving records for County Galway.

1861:  Census records for 1861 and 1871 were deliberately destroyed by the government

1881:  The records for 1881 and 1891 were pulped as waster paper during the shortages of World War I.

1901:   Full Census records are available    See below.

1911:   Full Census records are available    See below.

 

1911 Census

Overview of the townland.

There were just 3 houses in the townland of Ballinacragh in 1911 and all 3 were occupied and were listed as being private dwellings. They all had stone, brick or concrete walls and house 1 had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing while houses 2 and 3 had slate, iron or tiled roofs. House 1 was a 3rd class dwelling and houses 2 and 3 were 2nd class. House 1 had 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front and houses 2 and 3 had 5 rooms and 5 windows. There were 18 out buildings in the townland, 3 stables, 3 cow houses, 2 calf houses, 1 dairy, 3 piggeries, 1 boiling house, 3 piggeries, 2 barns, 2 sheds and 1 other unspecified out building. There were 16 people in the townland at that time.10 males and 6 females. The enumerator for the area was Alexander MacDonald.

 

House 1: Kelly

The head of the first family in Barnacragh was Malachy (68) and he had been married to Kate (44) for 20 years, during which time they had had 8 children. They shared the house with 7 of those children, Ellen (18), Patrick Jas (16), John (12), Malachy (10), Kathleen (8), Michael (6) and Gerald (3). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick Jas could speak both Irish and English and, apart from young Gerald, they could all read and write. Malachy (68) was a farmer and Patrick Jas, John, Malachy, Kathleen and Michael were scholars. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms and they had a stable, a cow houses, a piggery and an unspecified out building. The landholder was Malachy Kelly.

 

House 2: Goode

Michael (42) lived in this house with his brother, Martin (38) and both were single men. They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic, could read and write and were listed as being farmers. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 5 rooms and they had a stable, a cow houses, a calf house, a piggery, a barn and a shed. The landholder was Michael Goode.

 

House 3: Goode

Bernard (40) was the head of the last household in Barnacragh and he was married to Annie (36) but there were no details of for how long or how many children they might have had. They shared the house with Bernard’s widowed mother, Bridget (74) and 2 children John (27) and Maggie (30). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic, with the exception of Annie, who was born in Co. Roscommon. They could all read and write and Bernard and John were listed as being Farmers. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 5 rooms and they had a stable, a cow houses, a calf house, a dairy, a piggery, a boiling house, a barn and a shed. The landholder was Bernard Goode.

 

1901 Census

Overview of the townland.

There were a total of just 3 houses in the townland of Barnacagh in 1901 and they were all occupied and listed as being private dwellings. They were all constructed of brick, stone or concrete walls and houses 1 and 3 had slate, iron or tiled roofs and house 2 had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. They were all 2nd class dwellings and house 2 had 2 rooms and 3 windows in the front, house 1 had 3 rooms and 4 windows and house 3 had 5 rooms and 6 windows in the front. There were 17 people in the townland at that time, 10 males and 7 females. The enumerator for the area was Const. John Tapley [sic].

 

House 1: Goode

Bernard (77) was the head of the first family in Barnacragh and was married to Bridget (66) and they shared the house with 6 of their children, Thomas (28), John (26), Martin (24), Kate (34), Delia (30), Maggie (22). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All could read and write and Bernard was a farmer, Thomas, John and Martin were farmer’s sons while Kate, Delia and Maggie were farmer’s daughters. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 3 rooms. The landholder was Bernard Goode.

 

House 2: Kelly

Lacky [sic][i] (56) was listed as the head of this family and he was married to Kate (34) and they lived in the house with 5 of their children, Ellen (8), Patrick Joseph (7), Mary (5), John (3) and Malachy (7mths). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Lacky [sic], Kate and Patrick Joseph could read and write, Ellen could read only and Mary, John and Malachy could not read. Lacky [sic] was a farmer and Ellen, Patrick Joseph and Mary were scholars. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 2 rooms. The landholder was Lack[ii] Kelly.

 

House 3: Goode

Michael (36) lived in the last house with his brother, Berny (32) and both were unmarried. They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic, could read and write and were farmers. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 5 rooms. The landholder was Michael Goode.

 

Griffith’s Valuation

The Earl of Cloncarty owned the land in Barnacragh and was the immediate lessor for all tenements.

 

Plot 1A: Patrick Shea leased a 10 acres, 3 roods and 10 perches of land for £7 and a house and office for £1

Plot 1B: Patrick Shea paid 10s for 2 acres and 6 perches of bog land.

Plot 2: Edward Cooke leased 9 acres and 14 perches of land for £3 10s.

Plot 3: Michael Goode paid £11 10s for 22 acres and 3 roods of land and £1 15s for a house and office.

Plot 4: James Kane leased 12 acres, 1 rood and 22 perches of land for £6 and a house and office for £1 5s.

 

 

 

 

 

 

[i] Possible Jacky

[ii] Possibly Jack.

This page was added on 01/02/2022.

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