Carrowkilleen

Civil Parish of Killinny

Natalie Cyrkel / University of Galway / Galway County Heritage Office

Cheathrú an Choillín/ Chathurn an Colin

fourth quarterland

Carnation little wood

In the northwest region of the parish of Killinny is the townland Carrowkilleen. Killinny is in the barony of Kiltartan in County Galway.

The Down Survey Map under the name ‘Carncullin,’ recorded the Lord of Clanmorris (Catholic) the owner in 1641 (pre Cromwell). There was no information listed for 1670 (post Cromwell). There were 257 plantation acres of unprofitable land, and 128 of profitable land.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books listed alternative spellings for Carrowkilleen. These are as follows: Ceathramhadh Coillín, Carhookilleen, Carrowkillin, and Carhookilleen. In Carrowkilleen was Scalpagoagh Cave, 2 other caves, and a few forts. As other townlands in this parish, the soil was rocky, gravely, and produced potatoes. There were cattle and sheep owned by Mr. Butler, a tenant in Carrowkilleen. Richard Gregory, Esq., Coole, Gort was the proprietor at the time and Edward Hunt Esq., Gort was the agent. Mr. Butler of Greg, Co. Clare, was the tenant on a 2 year lease, which is unexpired from 1838, he sublets in conacre for 4-0-0 per acre. The county cess or tax was 2-9,5 per acre and the tithe was withheld. Mr. Burke of Norman Grove and Patt [sic] Geoghegan of Carhookilleen [sic] were the authorities.

Griffith’s Valuation 1855

Carrowkilleen in 1855 consisted of 11 occupants, all of which leased their holdings from William H. Gregory. 

The first occupant, Martin Higgins, leased his land of 10 acres, 2 roods, 12 perches for £1-15-0. John Ward leased a holding of a house, office, and land with the area of 27 acres, 1 rood, 13 perches, valued to be £7-10-0. John Fallon’s holding of land was valued to be £8-0-0, with an area of 27 acres, 1 rood, 6 perches. Patrick Minnogue also leased a land holding. The area was 23 acres 0 roods 26 perches, valued to be £8-10-0. John Kavanagh’s land holding was recorded to be worth £3-0-0, the area was 8 acres, 0 roods, 15 perches. Patrick Mason leased a holding of a house, office, and land with an area of 52 acres, 0 roods, 34 perches. Patrick’s holding was estimated to be £15-5-0. Thomas Kavanagh leased a house and land with the recorded area of 34 acres, 3 roods, 17 perches, valued to be £10-15-0. Michael Nilan’s land was worth £18-5-0, and had an area of 118 acres, 3 roods, 33 perches. Bridget Diviny leased a house and land holding worth £3-15-0. The area of this holding was 8 acres, 0 roods, 0 perches. Thomas Kane was a occupant with a holding of a house, office, and land. The holding had an area of 87 acres, 0 roods, 26 perches, it was recorded to be worth £15-0-0. The final occupant, James Grady leased his land of 74 acres, 2 roods, 12 perches. The estimated worth was £17-5-0.

The total annual valuation of rateable property paid overall in Carrowkilleen was £109-0-0 for 472 acres, 0 roods, and 34 perches of house, offices, and land.

 

1901 Census

In Carrowkilleen, 3 households and 11 inhabitants were recorded by the 1901 census. There were a total of 6 males and 5 females. Houses in Carrowkilleen were built as private dwellings. Houses were made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the houses were made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. The heads of the households were Stephen Devney, John Grady, and Patrick Kerin. The household heads were herds, farmers, and farm labourers.  It is noted that there was no out-offices and farm steadings return form in the 1901 census for this townland, therefore the details of the out-offices and farm steadings is unknown.

Stephen Devney (65) was an unmarried herd who lived with his unmarried sister Mary Devney (40). There was no occupation listed for Mary. Both were born in County Galway and identify as Roman Catholic and can read and write. Irish and English were listed for Stephen and Mary. The siblings reside in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms, 2 front facing windows, 2 out-offices and farm- steadings. Stephen Devney owned the land on which his house was situated.

John Grady (60) was a farmer married to Mary Grady (58). The two lived with their three unmarried children, James Grady (36), Catherine Grady (30), and Patrick Grady (20). All children were listed as farmer’s sons/ daughters. All were born in County Galway and identified as Roman Catholic. All family members spoke Irish and English. John, Catherine, and Patrick, could read and write. Mary could only read, James was unable to read. The Grady family resided in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows, 3 rooms, and 5 out-offices and farm- steadings. John Grady owned the land on which his house was situated.

Patrick Kerin (60) was a farm labourer married to Mary Kerin (60). The two lived with their two unmarried children, John Kerin (22) and Mary Kerin (15). Only Mary (15) was listed as a farm labourer. All were born in County Galway and identified as Roman Catholic. All family members spoke Irish and English, and were all unable to read. The family resided in a 4th class house with no front windows, 1 room, and 1 out-office and farm- steading. John Burke owned the land on which the house was situated.

 

1911 Census

In Carrowkilleen, 6 households of 18 inhabitants were recorded by the 1911 census. There were a total of 9 males and 9 females. Houses in Carrowkilleen were built as private dwellings. Houses were made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the houses were made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. The heads of the households were Stephen Diviney, Mary Grady, Patrick Donohue, Michael Mannion and Patrick Kerrins. The sixth house was uninhabited and owned by Thomas Greene. The household heads were farmers, shepherds, and agricultural labourers. Stephen Diviney, Patrick Donohue, Mary Grady, Michael Mannion, and Patrick Kerrins were the household heads.

Stephen Diviney 1 (76) was an unmarried farmer who lived with his unmarried sister Mary Diviney (67). There was no occupation listed for Mary. Both were born in County Galway and identify as Roman Catholic. Mary could write, Stephen could not read nor write. Irish and English were listed for Stephen and Mary. The siblings reside in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms, 2 front facing windows, 1 fowl house, and 1 potato house. Stephen Diviney owned the land on which his house was situated.

Patrick Donohue(76) was a widow and agricultural labourer who lived with his sister, Bridget Nilan (78), who was also a widow. There was no occupation listed for Bridget. Both were born in County Galway and identify as Roman Catholic. Irish and English were listed for Stephen and Mary, neither could read. The siblings lived in a 3rd class, 1 room house with 1 front facing window and  no out-offices or farm- steadings. The land was owned by Michl [sic] Mannion.

Mary Grady (69) was a widow who lived with their three unmarried children, James Grady (40), Kate Grady (32), and Patrick Grady (28). All children were listed as farmer’s sons/ daughters. All were born in County Galway and identified as Roman Catholic. All family members spoke Irish and English. Kate and Patrick could read and write. James could only read, Mary was unable to read. The Grady family resided in a 2nd class, 4 bedroom house with 3 front windows. The property consisted of 1 stable, 1 coach house, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, and 1 barn. Mary Grady owned the land on which her house was situated.

Michael Mannion (72) was a farmer married to his wife of 43 years, Bridget Mannion (69). The couple bore 10 children, 7 of which were still living in 1911. The pair lived with their three unmarried children, Thomas Mannion (30), John Mannion (28), and Agatha Mannion (19). The family also lived with a boarder, Mary Keane (73). Agatha was a scholar, Thomas and John were farmer’s sons. There was no occupation listed for Mary. All were born in County Galway and identified as Roman Catholic. Only the parents, Michael and Bridget had Irish and English listed. All Mannions could read and write, Mary Keane could not. The Mannion family lived in a 2nd class, 6 bedroom house with 6 front windows. On the property was 1 stable, 1 coach house, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, and 1 barn. Michael Mannion was the landowner.

Patrick Kerrins 2 (74) was a shepherd married to his wife of 34 years, Mary Kerrins (68). The couple had only 2 children, both living in 1911. The two lived with their two unmarried children, John Kerrins (33) and Mary Kerrins (23). Mary (23) was listed as a domestic servant, John was listed as an agricultural labourer. All were born in County Galway and identified as Roman Catholic. All family members spoke Irish and English, Mary (23) did not have any languages listed. Only Mary (23) could read or write. The family resided in a 3rd class house with 1 front windows, 2 rooms, 1 piggery, and 1 fowl house. Thomas Burke owned the land on which the house was situated.

1 It is noted that the Diviney family was recorded in the 1901 census under the last name Devney.

2 It is noted that the Kerrins family was recorded in the 101 census under the last name Kerin.

This page was added on 13/03/2024.

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