Ballinaboy

Béal Átha na Bá

Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

The Alcock and Brown memorial at Ballinaboy.
Roger Harrison
The plaque on the Alcock and Brown Memorial
Roger Harrison
View from Ballinaboy
Roger Harrison
Ballinaboy
Roger Harrison
Plaque on the Alcock and Brown monument
Roger Harrison

Townland:                                 Ballinaboy

Civil Parish:                              Ballindoon

Barony:                                     Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                         Clifden

District Electoral Division:    Errislannan

Area:                                         316.17 acres / 316 acres, 0 roods, 27 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Clifden R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Map

Galway Library for Ballinaboy

Logainm for Ballinaboy

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Ballinboy

 

1911 Census for Ballinaboy

Overview of Ballinaboy in 1911

The 1911 census shows that there were a total of 16 houses in the townland of Ballinaboy and houses 14 and 16 were unoccupied. House 14 was the Ballinaboy national school and the land holder was J.T. Morris and the landholder of house 16 was Michael Thornton. House 5 was listed as being a lodging house and all the others, apart from house 14, were listed as being private dwellings. They were all constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and houses 2, 5 and 13 had slate, iron or tiled roofs while the others all had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. House 13 was a 1st class dwelling, houses 1-3, 5-7, 9 and 12 were second class dwellings and the others were all 3rd class. House 15 had 1 room and 1 window in the front, houses 4, 10 and 11 had 1 room and 2 windows in the front, house 8 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 2 windows and houses 3, 7 and 9 had between 2 and 4 rooms and between 2 and 4 rooms and 3 windows in the front. Houses 6 and 12 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 4 windows in the front, house 5 had 5 or 6 rooms and 2 windows in the front, houses 1 and 2 had 5 or 6 rooms and 4 windows and house 13 had 13 or more rooms and 4 windows in the front. There were 39 out buildings in the townland and they consisted of 10 stables, 2 coach houses, a harness room, 9 cow houses, a calf house, 7 piggeries, 6 fowl houses and 3 barns. The enumerator’s abstract return shows us that there were a total of 72 people in the townland at that time, 41 male and 31 female. The enumerator for the area was Const. James Boland.

 

Madden

The head of the first family in Ballinaboy was Patrick (66) and he was married to Margaret (68) and had been for 37 years and in that time they had had 10 children and 9 of which had survived. They shared the house with 3 of their sons, Thomas (29), Patrick (27) and Martin (20). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and all, apart from Margaret, could read and write. Patrick (66) was a farmer, Thomas and Patrick (27) were labourers and Martin was a farmer’s son. The house they all lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 5 or 6 rooms and they also had a stable and a piggery. The landholder was Patrick Madden.

 

Lavelle                                    (additional surname: Somers)

The head of this family was John (76) and he had been married to Deborah (71) for 43 years and they had had 2 children and both had survived. They shared the house with their grandson William Somers (10). They were all Protestant Episcopalian and John was born in Co. Mayo, Deborah was born in Queen’s County[i] and William was born in Co, Galway. John spoke both Irish and English and they could all read and write. John was a retired teacher and William was a scholar. The house they all lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 5 or 6 rooms and they also had a fowl house. The landholder was Patrick the Irish Church Missions.

 

Thornton

The head of this family in house 3 was Michael (55) and he had been married to Annie (50) for 20 years and in that time they had had 7 children and all had survived. Six of those children also lived in the house at that time and they were, Michael (17), Margaret (15), Annie (13), Sarah (10), Norah (8) and Catherine (4). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael (55), Annie (50), Michael (17), Margaret and Annie (15) could all speak both Irish and English and all, apart from Annie (50) and Catherine, could read and write. Michael (55) and Annie (50) were listed as being farmers, Michael (17) was a farmer’s son and Annie (13), Sarah, Norah and Catherine were all scholars. The house they all lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they also had a stable, a coach house, a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house. The landholder was Michael Thornton.

 

Connelly

Mathias (60) was listed as the head of this family and he was married to Anne (50) and they had been married for 16 years and they had had 4 children and all of those had survived. They shared the house with those 4 children and they were, Martin (15), Bridget (14), Thomas (12) and Bartley (2). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English, apart from young Bartley. Apart from Anne and Bartley, they could all read and write. Mathias was a farmer, Martin was a farm labourer and Thomas was a scholar. The house they all lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with 1 room and they also had a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a fowl house and a barn. The landholder was Mathias Connelly.

 

O’Driscoll                               (additional surnames: Phillips, Smith, Sweeney, Hosking, Earl and  Wickham)

The head of this household was Richard (34), who was married but there was no entry for a wife. Also in the house at the time were John George Phillips (24), Seton Smith (24), Walter Moss Sweeney (24), Leonard George Hosking (30), Henry Edward Earl (29) and Mary Wickham (44). Richard and Mary were Roman Catholic, John George, Walter Moss and Henry Edward were Church of England, Seton was Episcopal Church of Scotland and Leonard George was a Protestant Episcopalian. Richard was born in Dublin City, John George was born in Godalming, England, Seton was born in North Berwick, Scotland, Walter Moss was born in Liverpool, England, Leonard George and Henry Edward were born in England and Mary was born in Co. Galway. Mary spoke both Irish and English, but could not read, while the others could all read and write. Mary was a housekeeper and all the others were listed as being Wireless Telegraphists. The house they all lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 5 or 6 rooms. The landholder was J.T. Morris.

 

Folan                           (additional surname: Conneely)

John (50) was listed as the head of this family in house 6 and he had been married to Anne (45) for 24 years and they had had 12 children but only 7 had survived. They shared the house with those 7 children and they were, Michael (19), Annie (10), Honor (7), Margaret (5), Delia (4), Mary (2) and Patrick (7mths) and also in the house at that time was a niece, Abbey Conneely (16). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John, Anne, Michael, Annie and Abbey spoke both Irish and English. John could read only and Anne, Michael, Annie and Abbey could read and write. John was a wool weaver, Michael was a kitchen servant, Abbey was a farm servant and Annie, Honor and Margaret were scholars. The house they all lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable, a cow house and a piggery. The landholder was John Folan.

 

Conroy

The widow Mary (60) was listed as the head of this family and she shared the house with 3 of her children, Peter (22), John (19) and Bridget (14) and also in the house at that time was her brother, Michael (40). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English, except for Bridget, who only spoke English. Apart from Mary, they all could read and write. Mary was a farmer, Peter was a farmer’s son, John was a mail carrier, Bridget was a scholar and Michael was a farm labourer. The house they all lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn. The landholder was Mary Conroy.

 

McDonagh                              (additional surname: Mannion)

The head of the household in house 8 was the widower, Martin (86) and he lived in the house with his widowed sister, Kate Mannion (77) and his daughter, Mary (60). They were all born in Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English but could not read. Martin was a farmer, Kate was a dressmaker and Mary was a farm labourer. The house they all lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable and a cow house. The landholder was Martin McDonagh.

 

Walsh                                     (additional surname: Greene)

The widower, Patrick (79) was the head of this family and he shared the house with his son-in-law, Michael Greene (35) and his daughter, Bridget Greene (45). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English. Patrick could read and write, Michael could read only and Bridget could not read. Patrick was a farmer and Michael was a farm labourer. The house they all lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house. The landholder was Patrick Walsh.

 

Greene                         (additional surname: Dishel [sic])

Darby (69) was the head of this family and he was married to Mary (60) and had been for 37 years and in that time they had had 8 children and 6 of those had survived. They shared the house with 5 of those children and they were, Mark (35), Darby (26), Martin (23), Bridget (19) and Annie (16) and also in the house was a grandson Thomas Dishel [sic] (3). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English but only Martin and Annie could read and write. Mark, Darby (26), Martin, Bridget and Annie were all listed as being farm labourers. The house they all lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with 1 room and they had a stable, a cow house and a piggery. The landholder was Darby Greene.

 

Dishel [sic]

John (71) was listed as being the head of this family and he was married to Anne (69) and had been for 43 years and they had had 10 children, but only 5 had survived. They shared the house with one of their sons, Joseph (26). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and Anne and Joseph could read and write. John was a farmer and Joseph was a farmer’s son. The house they all lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with 1 room and they had a stable and a piggery. The landholder was John Dishel [sic].

 

Conneely

The widow Mary (70) was listed as the head of this family in house 12 and she shared the house with her son, Dudley (28). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They could speak both Irish and English but only Dudley could read and write. Mary was a farmer and Dudley was a farmer’s son. The house they all lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house and a fowl house. The landholder was Mary Conneely.

 

Morris                         (additional surnames: Conry and Conneely)

The head of this household was the widower, James Timothy (66) and he lived in the house with his son, Anthony James (27) and 3 servants, Michael Conry (25) and Mary Conry (29), who had been married for 1 year, and Joseph Conneely (15). They were all Roman Catholics and James Timothy was born in Co. Longford, Anthony James was born in England, Michael and Joseph were born in Co. Galway and Mary was born in Co. Galway. James Timothy, Michael and Joseph could all speak both Irish and English. Apart from Michael, they could all read and write. James Timothy was a justice of the peace (landlord independent means), Anthony James was an electrical engineer bachelor of arts (Oxford), Michael was a coachman domestic servant, Mary was a cook domestic servant and Joseph was a page domestic servant. The house was a 1st class dwelling with 13 or more rooms and they also had 2 stables, a coach house, a harness room, a cow house and a fowl house. The landholder was J. T. Morris.

 

Harte                           (additional surname: Keaney)

The widow, Bridget (70) was listed as the head of the last house in Ballinaboy and lived there with her son, John (27), her daughter-in-law, Annie (24) and a nephew, James Keaney (10). They were all Roman Catholics and Bridget and Annie were born in Co. Galway, John was born in Scotland and James was born in America. Bridget and John both spoke Irish and English and John, Annie and James could read and write. Bridget was a dressmaker, John was a farmer labourer and James was a scholar. The house was a single roomed, 3rd class dwelling and the landholder was Michael Thornton.

 

1901 Census for Ballinaboy

Overview of Ballinaboy in 1901

The census of 1901 shows there were a total of 18 houses in the townland of Ballinaboy with house 18 being unoccupied but the landholder was John Folan. All the other houses were occupied and were listed as being private dwellings. They were all constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and houses 1 and 3 had slate, iron or tiled roofs and all the others only had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. House 1 was a 1st class dwelling, houses 2-5, 7 and 9 were 2nd class dwellings, houses 6, 10, and 13-17 were 3rd class dwellings and houses 8, 11 and 12 were 4th class. Houses 8, 11 and 12 had 1 room and no windows, houses 6 and 17 had 1 room and 1 window in the front, houses 3, 10, 15 and 16 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 2 windows in the front and houses 5 and 9 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 3 windows in the front. Houses 2 and 4 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 4 windows in the front, house 7 had 5 or 6 rooms and 2 windows in the front and house 1 had between 10 and 12 rooms and 5 windows in the front. There was a total of 24 out buildings consisting of 2 stables, a coach house, 8 cow houses, 6 piggeries, 2 fowl houses, 2 barns, a turf house, a potato house and a workshop. The enumerator for the area was Sergeant Tom Sullivan.

 

Morris                         (additional surnames: Stacey, Conneelly (sic) and Faherty)

The head of the family in the first house in Ballinaboy was James Timothy Aloysius (56) and he was married to Anna Maria (47). Also in the house at that time were a boarder, George Stacey (42) and 2 servants, Sarah Conneelly (sic) (16) and Maggie Faherty (14). They were all Roman Catholic and James Timothy Aloysius was born in Co. Longford, Anne Maria and George were born in England and Sarah and Maggie were born in Co, Galway. James Timothy Aloysius, Sarah and Maggie spoke Irish and English and Anna Maria and George spoke only English. James Timothy Aloysius was a Gentleman J.P. Land Proprietor, Anna Maria was a lady, George was a priest and Sarah and Maggie were Servants (general) domestic. The house was a 1st class dwelling with between 10 and 12 rooms and they had a stable, a coach house, a piggery, a fowl house, a turf house and a workshop. The landholder was James T. A. Morris.

 

Madden

The head of this family was Patrick (49) and he was married to Margaret (48) and they shared the house with 6 of their children, John (21), Thomas (18), Patrick (15), Peter (12), Martin (10) and Maria (14). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and, apart from Margaret, they all could read and write. Patrick was a farmer, John and Thomas were farmer’s sons and all the other children were scholars. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house and a piggery. The landholder was Patrick Madden.

 

Conroy

John (70) was the head of this family and he shared the house with his wife, Margaret (65). Both were members of the Irish Church and born in Co. Galway. They could speak both Irish and English and read and write. John was a scripture reader and Margaret was a housekeeper. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house. The landholder was John Conroy.

 

Connolly

The widow Mary (57) was the head of this family and she shared the house with 3 of her children, Dudley (21), Honor (19) and Ellen (14). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and Mary could read only and the children could all read and write. Mary was a postmistress, Dudley was a farmer, Honor was a postmistress’ assistant and Ellen was a scholar. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a piggery. The landholder was Mary Connolly.

 

Thornton

The head of this family in house 5 was Michael (34) and he was married to Anne (32) and they shared the house with 5 of their children and they were, Mary (10), Michael (8), Margaret (6), Sarah (4) and Anne (1). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael (34) and Anne (32) spoke both Irish and English and the children, with the exception of baby Anne, spoke only English. Michael (34) and Anne (32) could read and write and Mary and Michael (8) could read only. Michael (34) was a farmer and Mary and Michael (8) were scholars. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable and a cow house. The landholder was Michael Thornton.

 

Hart                             (additional surnames: Feeney and Coyne)

The widow Bridget (56) was listed as the head of this household and she shared the house with her son, John (17) and 2 boarders, Maggie Feeney (80) and Mary Coyne (76). All were Roman Catholic and John was born in Scotland and all the others were born in Co. Galway. All of the family could speak both Irish and English but only John could read and write. John was a postman. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with 1 room. The landholder was Michael Thornton.

 

O’Connor

The widow, Elizabeth (40) was the head of this family and she lived in the house with her daughter, Edith (17). They were both Roman Catholic and Elizabeth was born in Co. Galway, Clifden and Edith was born in Dublin City. Both could read and write and Elizabeth was a lady with an income from land. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 5 or 6 rooms. The landholder was James T. A. Morris.

 

Mannion                                  (additional surname: Folan)

Michael (70) was the head of this family in house 8 and he was married but there was no wife listed in this entry. Also in the house were his son, Michael (21) and a visitor, Mary Folan (50). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English but none of them could read. Michael (70) was a farmer, Michael (21) was a farmer’s son and Mary was a farm servant. The house was a 4th class dwelling with 1 room and they had a cow house. The landholder was Michael Mannion.

 

Conroy

Peter (58) was listed as the head of this family and he was married to Mary (50) and they shared the house with 4 of their children, Michael (16), Peter (13), John (11) and Bridget (6). All of the family were born in County Galway and all were Roman Catholic. Peter (58) and Mary could speak Irish and English and the children only spoke Irish. John could read only and Peter (58) and Peter (13) could read and write. Peter (58) was a farmer, Mary was a wool spinner, Michael was a farmer’s son and the other children were all scholars. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house, a piggery and a potato house. The landholder was Peter Conroy.

 

McDonough                            (additional surname: Joyce)

The head of the family in house 10 was Martin (78) and he was married to Mary (78) and they shared the house with their daughter, Mary (30) and also in the house at that time was a visitor, Patrick Joyce (45). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English but none could read. Martin was a farmer, Mary was a farmer’s daughter and Patrick was a farm servant. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house. The landholder was Martin McDonough.

 

Flaherty                                  (additional surname: Davin)

Michael (35) was the head of this family and he was married to Kate (30) and they shared the house with 2 of their daughters, Mary (5) and Anne (2) and also a visitor, Mary Davin (60), who was a widow. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English, except for young Anne. None of the family could read. Michael was a general agricultural labourer. The house was a 4th class dwelling with only the 1 room. The landholder was Martin McDonough.

 

Mulkerrin

Michael (64) was the head of the family in house 12 and he was married to Honor (67). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They could speak both Irish and English but neither of them could read. The house was a 4th class dwelling with only the 1 room. The landholder was Patrick Walsh.

 

Walsh

The widower Patrick (65) was the head of this family and he shared the house with his daughter, Bridget (30). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They could speak both Irish and English but only Patrick could read and write. Patrick was a farmer and Bridget was a farmer’s daughter. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house. The landholder was Patrick Walsh.

 

Dishell

John (62) was the head of this Dishell family and he was married to Anne (55) and they lived in the house with 3 of their sons, Willie (23), James (21) and Joseph (17). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and all could read and write. John was a farmer, Anne was a farmer’s wife and the sons were all agricultural labourers. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a piggery and a barn. The landholder was John Dishell.

 

Green

Darby (44) was the head of the family in house 15 and he was married to Mary (44) and they shared the house with 5 of their children and they were Mark (21), Darby (15), Martin (13), Bridget (8) and Annie (6) and also in the house at that time was a nephew, Thomas (40). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English but only Martin could read and write. Darby (44) was a fisherman and a farmer, Mark was a coachman domestic, Darby (15) and Thomas were farmer’s sons and Martin was a scholar. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a barn. The landholder was Darby Green.

 

Connely (sic)                          (additional surname: Conneely)

The head of this family was Mathow (sic) (44) and he was married to Ann Conneely (nee Feeney) (36) and they shared the house with 3 of their children, Martin (5), Bridget (4) and Thomas (2). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mathow (sic) and Anne spoke Irish and English and only Mathow (sic) could read and write. Mathow (sic) was farmer. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house. The landholder was Mathias Conneely.

 

Gorham

The widow Bridget (85) was listed as the sole occupant of the last house in Ballinaboy. She was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway. She spoke both Irish and English, could not read and was a wool spinner. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with a single room. The landholder was Mathias Conneely.

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Ballinaboy

Mary Conneely – Application No. C/15 927, Ref No. Cen S/11/289. The application was received on 8th February 1915 with an address at time of Mr. Matthew Conneely, Ballinaboy Clifden. Mary’s parents were given as Bartley and Kate Conneely. The address for the search in 1851 was Ballinaboy, in the Parish of Ballinaboy, in the Barony of Ballynahinch, Co. Galway. The search was returned on 9th February 1915 with the note saying “Appeal one year”.

Thomas Dishell – Application No. C/16 1160, Ref. No. Cen S/11/290. The application was received on 9th February 1916 with an address of Ballyconneely, Clifden, Co. Galway. Thomas’ parents were listed as being Bartley and Bridget Dishell. The 1851 address given for the search was Ballinaboy, in the Parish of Ballindoon, in the Barony of Ballynahinch, Co. Galway. The search was returned on 10th February.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Ballinaboy

The main immediate lessor was Anthony Morris and he leased a number of tenements in the townland. He owned 22 acres, 3 roods and 23 perches of land with an annual ratable valuation of £1. Martin Corcoran leased a house on 12 acres, 2 roods and 33 perches of land for 15s for the land and 5s for the house, Michael Gorham leased a house on 9 acres, 2 roods and 18 perches of land for 15s for the land and 4s for the house, Michael Thornton leased a house on 11 acres, 2 roods and 25 perches of land for £1 for the land and 5s for the house and Bartholomew Conneely leased a house and office on 16 acres and 21 perches of land for £1 15s for the land and 5s for the buildings. Ulick Conneely leased a house on 6 acres, 3 roods and 23 perches of land for 12s for the land and 4s for the house, Thaddeus Murray leased a house and offices on 10 acres and 3 roods of land for £3 for the land and 15s for the buildings, Patrick McCormick leased a house and offices on 13 acres, 1 rood and 9 perches of land for £1 15s for the land and 12s for the buildings and Patrick Gorham leased a house and offices on 10 acres and 3 roods of land for £1 9s for the land and 12s for the buildings. Bartholomew Dishel (sic) leased a house and offices on 25 acres and 27 perches of land for £4 5s for the land and 10s for the buildings, Patriock Mannion leased a house from Bartholomew Dishel (sic) for 8s, Cornelius Conrey (sic) leased a house and offices on 13 acres, 2 roods and 18 perches of land for £1 13s for the land and 12s for the buildings, Nicholas Darcy leased a house and offices on 11 acres, 3 roods and 27 perches of land for 15s for the land and 10s for the buildings and Patrick Conneely leased a house on 11 acres and 16 perches of land for 12s for the land and 5s for the house. Martin Thornton leased a house and office on 7 acres, 1 rood and 26 perches of land for 7s for the land and 5s for the buildings, Thomas Thornton leased a house on 8 acres and 10 perches of land for 5s for the land and 5s for the house, John Joyce leased a house on 2 acres, 1 rood and 14 perches of land for 4s for the land and 5s for the house and Edward Feenarty (sic) leased a house on 3 acres, 1 rood and 6 perches of land for 5s for the land 5s for the house. Bridget Conneely leased a house on 8 acres, 2 roods and 8 perches of land for 10s for the land and 5s for the house, The Irish Church Mission Society leased a school house on 9 acres and 10 perches of land for £1 for the land and £1 5s for the school house and also another schoolhouse that was in the progress of being built that had an annual ratable valuation of £5, Anthony Morris paid an annual half of £6 and Catherine Adams leased a house from Anthony Morris for 5s. Anthony Morris owned 11acres, 1 rood and 34 perches of land with an annual ratable valuation of 10s, 8 acres, 2 roods and 21 perches of land with a valuation of 8s, 16 acres, 1 rood and 25 perches of bog with an annual ratable valuation of 4s and a house on 39 acres, 1 rood and 16 perches of land with a valuation of £10 for the land and £3 10s for the house. Patrick Conroy leased 3 tenements for Anthony Morris, 1acre, 3 roods and 4 perches of land for 2s, a house on 1 acre, 1 rood and 24 perches of land for 6s for the land and 6s for the house and 20 perches of land for 1s. There were also 2 acres, 3 roods and 35 perches of water in the townland. There were exemptions for the Irish Church Missions Society for the land and school houses of £1 for land and £1 5s and £5 for building. There were 2 islands of no agricultural value belonging to Anthony Morris of 13 perches.

 

1670 Down Survey for Ballinaboy

The 1670 Down Survey name for this area was Balliboy. The 1641 owners (Pre Cromwell) were Edmund O’Loy and Loughlin O’Loy, both Catholics and in 1670 the owners were the Catholic, Richard Martin and the Protestant, Francis Browne. There were 165 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 18 plantation acres of profitable land and 18 plantation acres were forfeited.

[i] County Laios

This page was added on 11/06/2018.

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