Drinagh

Draighneach

Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

Information board at the Errislannan Church of Ireland church
Roger Harrison
Baptismal font in the grounds of the Errislannan Church of Ireland church
Roger Harrison
Errislannan Church of Ireland Church
Roger Harrison

Townland:                                 Drinagh

Civil Parish:                              Ballindoon

Barony:                                     Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                         Clifden

District Electoral Division:    Errislannan

Area:                                         420.87 acres / 420 acres, 3 roods, 19 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Clifden R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Drinagh (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Drinagh

Logainm for Drinagh

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Drinagh

 

1911 Census for Drinagh

Overview of Drinagh in 1911

The 1911 census shows that there were a total of 11 houses with 8 of those houses being occupied. House 11 was the church and the landholder was Alice Heaslip, houses 5 and 6 were unoccupied but the land holder was Alice Heaslip. All the occupied houses were listed as being private dwellings and were constructed of stone, brick or concrete and houses 3, 4 and 10 had slate, iron or tiled roofs and the others all had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. House 3 was a 1st class dwelling, houses 2, 4, 8 and 10 were 2nd class dwellings and houses 1, 7 and 9 were 3rd class. Houses 1, 7, 9 and 10 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 2 windows in the front, houses 2 and 8 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 3 windows in the front, house 4 had 5 or 6 rooms and 4 windows and house 3 had between 10 and 12 rooms and 4 windows in the front. There were a total of 19 out buildings in the townland and they consisted of 3 stables, a coach house, 7 cow houses, 4 piggeries, 3 fowl houses and a barn. There were 37 people in the townland at that time and they consisted of 21 males and 16 females. 3 males and 3 females were Church of Ireland and the rest were Roman Catholic. The enumerator for the area was Const. James Boland.

 

Gorham

The head of the first family in Drinagh was Patrick (68) and he had been married to Anne (66) for 31 years and they had 6 children of which 5 had survived. They shared the house with their son, Mark (16). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Protestant Episcopalian. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and Anne could read only while Patrick and Mark could read and write. Patrick was a farmer and Mark was a farmer’s son. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house. The landholder was listed as being Patrick Gorham.

 

Conneely

Andrew (89) was the head of this family and he was a widower and lived in the house with his son, John (65), who had been married to Anne (64) for 35 years and they had had 7 children of which 5 had survived. Two of those children also lived in the house and they were, Margaret (23) and Patrick (20). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and only John, Margaret and Patrick could read and write. Anne was a housekeeper and the others were all listed as being farmers. The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house. The landholder was listed as being Andrew Conneely.

 

Heaslip

The sole occupant of house 3 was Alice M. (57) who was born in Dublin and was an Episcopalian. Alice and been married for 30 years and had 2 children. She spoke both Irish and English, could read and write and was listed as being a land owner. The house they lived in was a 1st class dwelling with between 10 and 12 rooms and they had a stable, a coach house, a cow house and a fowl house. The landholder was listed as being Alice Heaslip.

 

Purser

William Spencer (25) was the head of this family and he was married to Sarah Elizabeth (26). They were both Protestant Episcopalians and were born in England. They could both read and write and William was a wireless telegraphist. The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 5 or 6 rooms. The landholder was listed as being Alice Heaslip.

 

Conroy

The head of the family in house 7 was James (41) and he was married to Jane (43) and they lived in the house with 4 of their children Mary (7), Stephen (5), John (4) and Barbara (1). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. James and Jane could speak both Irish and English and the children only spoke English. Mary could read only and James and Jane could read and write. James was a farmer and Mary was a scholar. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable, a cow house and a piggery. The landholder was listed as being James Conroy.

 

King

John (70) was the head of this family and he was married to Barbara (65) and had been for 41 years and they had had 11 children and 10 of those had survived. They lived in the house with 2 of their children, Joseph (28) and Sarah (21). They were all born in Galway but no religion was listed. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and, apart from Barbara, they could all read and write. John and Joseph were farmers. The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable, cow house, a piggery and a barn. The landholder was listed as being John King.

 

King                            (additional surname: Cloonan)

The head of this family in house 9 was Patrick (36) and he had been married to Celia (32) for 14 years and in that time they had had 7 children, all of whom had survived. They shared the house with those 7 children and they were, Mary (13), John (12), Patrick (9), Thomas (6), Cilia (4), Larance (sic) (2) and Valentine (2) and also in the house at that time was a niece, Mary Cloonan (16). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic, although Mary Cloonan had no place of birth listed. Patrick, Celia, Mary (13) and John spoke Irish and English and the others, except Mary Cloonan, spoke only English. Thomas, Cilia, Larance (sic) and Valentine could not read and all the others could read and write. Patrick was a farmer, Mary Cloonan was a farm servant and Mary (13), John and Patrick (9) were scholars. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house. The landholder was listed as being Patrick King.

 

King

Michael (38) was listed as the head of the last family in Drinagh and he had been married to Lizzie (37) for 11 years and they had had 4 children, Edward (9), George (6), Michal Angelo (4) and Mary (3 mths). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic, except for Lizzie, who was born in Kildare. Michael spoke Irish and English and all the others spoke only English. Michael, Lizzie, Edward and George could read and write. Michael was a postman and Edward and George were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house. The landholder was listed as being Michael King.

 

 

1901 Census for Drinagh

Overview of Drinagh in 1901

The census of 1901 shows that there were a total of 10 houses 5, 9 and 10 being unoccupied. The landholder of houses 5 and 9 was Walter Wall and there was no landholder listed for house 10. House 10 was the Protestant church and all the other houses were listed as being private dwellings. All the occupied houses were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. House 7 was a 2nd class dwelling while all the others were 3rd class. Houses 3 and 8 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 1 window in the front, houses 1, 2, 4 and 6 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 2 windows in the front and house 7 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 3 windows. There was a total of 15 out buildings and they consisted of a stable, 5 cow houses, 5 piggeries, 1 fowl house and 3 potato houses. There were 35 people in the townland at that time, 17 males and 18 females. 4 males and 2 females were Protestant and all the others were Roman Catholic. The enumerator for the area was Sergeant William Sullivan.

 

Conneely

The widow Honor (73) was listed as the head of the first house in Drinagh and she lived in the house with her son, Michael (55). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They both could speak both Irish and English and Michael could read only. Honor was a farmer and Michael was a farmer’s son. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house, a piggery and a potato house. The landholder was Honor Conneely.

 

King

John (55) was the head of this family and he was married to Barbara (50) and they shared the house with 5 of their children, James (17), Joseph (15), Val (14), Maggie (13) and Sarah (11). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Maggie and Sarah spoke only English and all the others spoke both Irish and English. John could read only, Barbara could not read and all the children could read and write. John was a farmer, James, Joseph and Val were farmer’s sons and Maggie and Sarah were scholars. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a potato house. The landholder was John King.

 

King

The head of this family in house 3 was Patrick (25) and he was married to Celia (23) and they shared the house with their 2 children, Mary (4) and John (2). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick and Celia could speak both Irish and English and read and write. Patrick was listed as being a farmer. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms. The landholder was John King.

 

Conroy

The head of the family in house 4 was James (30) and he lived in the house with his sister, Sarah (21) and his brother, John (18). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and could read and write. James was a farmer, Sarah was a dressmaker and John was a farm labourer. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house. The landholder was James Conroy.

 

Conneely                                 (additional surnames: Coyne, Faherty and Duane)

Valentine (60) was the head of this family and he was married to Anne (60) and they shared the house with their daughter, Bridget Coyne (30), 2 granddaughters, Mary Coyne (10) and Anne Coyne (7), a mother-in-law, Mary Faherty (80) and a visitor, Barbara Duane (25). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Apart from Mary and Anne Coyne, they could all speak both Irish and English. Valentine could read only and Mary and Anne Coyne and Barbara could read and write. Valentine was a farmer, Bridget was a farmer’s daughter, Mary (10) and Anne (7) were scholars and Barbara was a dressmaker. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house and a piggery. The landholder was Valentine Conneely.

 

Conneely

The widower Andrew (70) was the head of this family and he lived in the house with his son, John (45), his daughter-in-law, Anne (45) and 3 grandchildren, Honor (14), Margret (12) and Patrick (10). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English, except for Patrick, who only spoke English. John, Honor and Margret could read and write. Andrew was a farmer, John was a farmer’s son, Anne was a housekeeper and the grandchildren were all scholars. The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a piggery. The landholder was Andrew Conneely.

 

Gorham

Patt (54) was the head of the last family in Drinagh and he was married to Anne (50) and they shared the house with 4 of their children, John (19), Patt (17), Mary (14) and Mark (8). They were all born in Co. Galway and were members of the Irish church. All of the family could speak both Irish and English except for Mark who only spoke English. Anne and Mark could read only and all the others could read and write. Patt (54) was a farmer, Anne had no occupation, John and Patt (17) were farmer’s sons and Mary and Mark were scholars. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a potato house. The landholder was Patrick Gorham.

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Drinagh

Anthony Skerrit (sic) owner 62 acres, 1 rood and 28 perches of land which had an annual ratable valuation of £3 15s. The Rev. Richard Wall owned 149 acres, 1 rood and 21 perches of land with an annual ratable Valuation of £25. Thaddeus Coffey leased a house form Rev. Richard Wall for 10s, William Ryan leased a house, offices and a garden of 30 perches from Rev. Richard Wall for 2s for the garden and £1 5s for the buildings and The church leased a church from Rev. Richard Wall for 8s. The Rev. Richard Wall owned a further 159 acres, 2 roods and 30 perches of land with an annual ratable valuation of £9 15s, Martin Conneely leased a house and offices on 6 acres and 10 perches of land for £1 for the land and 8s for the buildings. Martin Conneely, Patrick Dowd and Mary Gorham jointly leased 1 acre, 1 rood and 24 perches of land for 2s each. There were 14 acres, 1 rood and 17 perches of water in the townland. There was an exemption of 8s for the church.

 

1670 Down Survey for Drinagh

The 1670 Down Survey name for this area was Ballileare. The 1641 owner was Murrogh O’Flahartye, who was a Catholic and in 1670 owner was the Catholic Richard Martin. There were 199 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 3 plantation acres of profitable land and 3 plantation acres were forfeited.

This page was added on 11/06/2018.

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