Ballyconneely

Baile Conaola

Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

Townland:                                 Ballyconneely

Civil Parish:                              Ballindoon

Barony:                                     Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                         Clifden

District Electoral Division:    Bunowen

Poor Law Union:                    No Records

Area:                                         1358.78 acres / 1358 acres, 3 roods, 4 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Clifden R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Map

Galway Library for Ballyconneely

Logaimn for Ballyconneely

NUI Galway Digital Collection for Ballyconneely

 

1911 Census for Ballyconneely

Overview of Ballyconneely in 1911

In the DED of Bunowen the houses in the census were listed sequentially through the whole DED and, so, in the townland of Ballyconneely the 26 houses were listed as houses 40 to 65.

 

There were a total of 26 houses in the townland but house 65 was unoccupied and was the R.C. Church. House 64 was the R.I.C. barracks and all the other houses were listed as being occupied and being private dwellings. All the houses were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and houses 45, 46, 57, 58, 59, 64 and 65 had slate, iron or tiled roofs and all the others had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. Houses 46, 58 and 59 were 1st class dwellings, houses 42, 45, 47, 55, 56, 57, 64 and 65 were 2nd class dwellings and all the others were 3rd class. Houses 61 had 1 room and 1 window in the front, house 43 had 1 room and 2 windows, houses 48 and 62 had between 2 and 4 rooms and had 1 window in the front. Houses 40, 41, 44, 49-54, 60 and 63 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 2 rooms in the front, houses 42, 47 and 55 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 3 windows, houses 56 and 57 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 4 windows, house 64 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 5 windows and house 65 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 6 windows in the front. House 45 had 5 or 6 rooms and 6 windows, house 59 had between 7 and 9 rooms and 6 windows, house 58 had between 10 and 12 rooms and 9 windows in the front and house 46 had 13 or more rooms and 8 windows in the front. There were a total of 69 out buildings in the townland consisting of 15 stables, 4 coach houses, 2 harness rooms, 23 cow houses, 13 piggeries, 2 fowl houses, a boiling house, 4 turf houses, a shed and 4 stores. There were 121 people, 60 males and 61 females of which 5 males and 7 females were Church of Ireland and the rest were all Roman Catholic. The enumerator for the area was Sgt. Daniel Brougham.

 

Joyce

John (71) was the head of the first house in Ballyconneely and he was married to Winnie (66) and had been for 40 years and in that time they had had 14 children but only 10 had survived. They shared the house with 3 of their sons, Mark (24), John (22) and Peter (20). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English but only the sons could read and write. John (71) was a herd. The house was 3rd class dwelling with a cow house. The landholder was unreadable.

 

King

The sole occupant of this house was Michael (70), a widower. He was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway. He spoke both Irish and English but could not read. He was a farmer. The house was 3rd class dwelling with a cow house and a piggery.

 

Lacey

The head of this family was Edward (80) who had been married to Mary (82) for 54 years and they had had 7 children and 6 of those had survived. They shared then house with their son, Thomas (37), their daughter-in-law, Margaret (31), who had been married to Thomas for 7 years and they had had 4 children 3 of those also lived in the house and they were, Mary (6), Patrick (3), John (1). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Edward, Mary (82), Thomas and Margaret spoke Irish and English and Mary (3) and Patrick spoke only English. Only Thomas, Margaret and Mary (6) could read and write. Edward was a farmer, Thomas was a farmer’s son and Mary (6) was a scholar. The house was 2nd class dwelling with a cow house and a piggery. There was no landholder listed.

 

Dishill (sic)

Thomas (67) was the head of this family and he had been married to Catherine (68) for 37 years and they had had 7 children but only 4 of those had survived. They shared the house with their son, Thomas (22). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and Catherine could read only and the Thomas’ could read and write. Thomas (67) was a farmer and Thomas (22) was a farmer’s son. The house was a single roomed 3rd class dwelling and they had a stable and a cow house.

 

King

The widow Margaret (74) was the head of this family and she shared the house with her son Mark (40). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They could speak both Irish and English and also read and write. Mark was a farmer. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house and a piggery.

 

Ryan                                        (additional surname: Concannon)

The head of this household was listed as being James (52) and he shared the house with a servant, Brigid Concannon (46). They were both born in Co. Mayo and were Roman Catholic. They could speak both Irish and English and read and write. James was a Roman Catholic clergyman and Brigid was a cook and domestic servant. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 5 or 6 rooms and they had a stable and a cow house. The landholder was Repr. J. Gorham of Clifden.

 

O’Flaherty                              (additional surnames: Fuller, Guines (sic) and Sullivan)

George Henry (26) was the head of this household and he shared the house with his sisters, Helen (28) and Mabel (27) and also in the house were a nephew, Charles Fuller (5) and 2 servants, Margarget (sic) Guines (sic) (32) and Patrick Sullivan (19). George Henry, Helen and Mabel were born in Co. Galway, Charles was born in London, Margarget (sic) was born in Co. Westmeath and Patrick was born in Galway Town, and all were Roman Catholic. Patrick could speak Irish and English and all, apart from Charles, could read and write. George Henry was a land owner, and Margarget (sic) and Patrick were general servants. The house was a 1st class dwelling with 13 or more rooms and they had a stable, a coach house, a harness room, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a turf house.

 

Malley                                     (additional surname: Kelly)

The head of this family was John (48) and he was married to Anne (44) and they had been married for 20 years and they had had 10 children and all of those had survived. Those 10 children lived with them and they were, Mary (18), Michael (16), John (15), Kathleen (13), Sarah (11), Annie (9), Bridget (7), Thomas (5), Norah (3) and Margaret (8mths) and also in the house at that time was a widow Catherine Kelly (78), but there was no relation entered. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Apart from Thomas, Norah and Margaret, they all spoke Irish and English. Thomas, Norah, and Margaret could not read, Catherine and John (48) could read only and all the others could read and write. John and Michael were farmers, Anne and Mary were listed as being farmer’s daughters, John (15), Kathleen, Sarah, Annie and Bridget were scholars. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable and a cow house.

 

 

Madden

Patt (70) was listed as being the head of this family and he had been married to Margaret (52) for 31 years and they had had 9 children but only 5 of those had survived. They shared the house with 2 of those children, Thomas (20) and Norah (16). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English. Patt could read only and the others could all read and write. Patt was a farmer, Thomas was a farmer’s son and Norah was a farmer’s daughter. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable and a cow house. Charles Murphy was listed as the landholder.

 

ODonnell

The head of the family in house 49 was John (38) and he had been married to Lizzie (32) for 3 years and they had had 2 children, Mary (2) and John (1). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John spoke Irish and English and John and Lizzie could read and write. John was a farmer. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house and a piggery.

 

King

The widow, Bridget (78) was listed as being the head of this family and she lived with her widowed son, Festus (40) and 3 other children[i], Helena (12), Bryan (10) and Agnes (8). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman. Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English except Agnes. Only Festus could read and write. Festus was a carpenter and Helena, Bryan and Agnes were scholars. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house and a piggery.

 

Duane

The widower, Thomas (84) was the head of this family and he lived with his son Thomas (34). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They could speak both Irish and English and read and write. Thomas (84) was listed as being a farmer and Thomas (34) was a farmer’s son. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house and a piggery.

 

Malley

The widow Honor (74) was listed as the head of the family in house 52 and she shared the house with 4 of her sons, John (45), Thomas (43), Vall (sic) (40) and Stephen (25). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English but only Stephen could read and write. The sons were all listed as being farmer’s sons. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house and a piggery.

 

Malley                                     (additional surname: McCann)

The widower Michael McCann (85) was the head of the family and he shared the house with his son-in-law, Owen (46) and he had been married to Kate (44) for 17 years and they had had 8 children and all had survived. Those 8 children, Michael McCann’s grandchildren, also lived in the house and they were Mary (17), Michael (15), Annie (14), Thomas (12), Katie (8), Bridget (6), John (2) and Celia (2). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael (85), Owen, Kate and Mary spoke both Irish and English and all the others only spoke English. Michael (85), Bridget, John and Celia could not read but all the others could read and write. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable and a cow house.

 

Mulkerrin

Thomas (54) was the head of this family and he had been married to Honor (45) for 14 years and they had had 4 children and 3 of those had survived. Those 3 children lived with them and they were, Patrick (12), John (11) and Mary (8). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English, except Mary, and all, apart from Thomas, could read and write. Thomas was a farmer and all the children were scholars. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable and a cow house.

 

McDonagh

Mark (76) was the head of the family in house 55 and he had been married to Barbara (74) for 50 years and in that time they had had 11 children, but only 4 had survived. They shared the house with their daughter, Kathryn (27). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mark and Barbara spoke Irish and English while Kathryn spoke only English. Barbara could read only and Mark and Kathryn could read and write. Mark was listed as being a farmer. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

 

Malley                                     (additional surname: Uniacke)

The head of this family was Michael (67) and he had been married to Bridget (63) for 38 years and in that time they had had 8 children but only 3 had survived. Those 3 children lived with them and they were, Thomas (28), Mary (24) and Valentine (18) and also in the house was Bridget’s father, John Uniacke (90), a widower. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael, Bridget and John spoke Irish and English and Thomas, Mary and Valentine all spoke only English. Bridget could not read, Michael and John could read only and the others could all read and write. Michael was a farmer and Thomas and Valentine were farmer’s sons. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

 

Kelly

The head of this Kelly family was Valentine (74) and he had been married to Maria (62) for 37 years and they had had 10 children, of which 7 had survived. They lived in the house with 4 of those children, Bernard (35), Mary Anne (36), Bridget (33) and Margaret (30). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and read and write. Valentine was a farmer, Bernard was a farmer’s son and Mary Anne and Margaret were dressmakers. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable, a coach house, a cow house and a piggery.

 

O’Flaherty                                          (additional surname: Hunt and Flaherty)

The widower Thomas (62) was listed as the head of this family and he shared the house with 4 of his children, Mary Agnes (25), Thomas (20), Alice (17) and Michael John (16). Also living in the house at that time were 2 servants, George Hunt (19) and Maggie Flaherty (19). George was a Presbyterian and the others were all Roman Catholic. Thomas (62) was born in Co. Kerry, George was born in Co. Wexford and all the others were born in Co. Galway. Thomas (62) and Maggie spoke both Irish and English and all could read and write. Thomas (62) was a farmer, Mary Agnes and Alice were farmer’s daughters, Thomas (20) was a farmer’s son, Michael John was a student, George was a shop assistant and Maggie was a domestic servant. The house was a 1st class dwelling with between 10 and 12 rooms and they had 2 stables, a coach house, a harness room, 2 cow houses, a piggery, a fowl house, a boiling house, a turf house, a shed and 2 stores.

 

McWilliams                                        (additional surnames: Fenton and Knox)

The head of this family in house 59 was George (45) and he had been married to Charlotte E. (33) for 11 years and they had had 5 children, Arthur Gilbert (10), Ethel Mary (8), George Howard (6), Sylvia Mabel (5) and Irene Frances (1). Also living in the house at that time were a sister-in-law, Anne Frances Fenton (36) and a lodger boarder, Jane Knox (55). Anne Frances was a Methodist and all the others were Protestant Episcopalian. They were all born in Co. Galway, except Jane who was born in Kings Co[ii]. Apart from Irene Frances, they could all read and write. George was a postman, Arthur Gilbert, Ethel Mary, George Howard and Sylvia Mabel were scholars, Anne Frances was a governess and Jane was a G post mistress. The house was a 1st class dwelling with between 7 and 9 rooms and they had a stable, a cow house, a piggery and 2 stores.

 

Billett

The widow Rosetta (53) was the head of this family and she shared the house with 3 of her children, Thomas (28), Rosie (24) and Samuel John (20). They were all Protestant Episcopalian and Rosetta was born in England, Thomas and Rosie were born in Co. Kerry and Samuel John was born in Co. Galway. Rosetta spoke only English and they could all read and write. Thomas was an ex stoker in the Royal Navy and Samuel John was a rural postman. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and the landholder was George McWilliams.

 

Hodgens (sic)

The sole occupant of this house was a widow, Anne (77) and she was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. She spoke both Irish and English but could not read. She lived in a single roomed, 3rd class dwelling, and the landholder was the Irish Church Mission Society.

 

Reilly                                      (additional surname: Conroy)

The widow Mary (86) was listed as the head of this family and she shared the house with her son, Festus (45) and her aunt, Honor Conroy (74). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and Festus and Honor could read and write. There were no occupations listed. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house. The landholder was the Irish Church Mission Society.

 

Madden

The widow Bridget (58) was the head of this family and she shared the house with her daughter, Bridget (21). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They could speak both Irish and English and read and write. There were no occupations listed. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable and a cow house.

 

Brougham

House 64 was the R.I.C. barracks and entries were divided into 2 parts for that house, 64.1 and 64.2. This is the entry for 64.1. The head of the family was listed as being Daniel (40) (from form H) and he had been married to Anna Maria (39) for 10 years and they had had 1 child, Kathleen May (10). They were all Roman Catholic and Daniel was born in Co. Westmeath and Anna Maria and Kathleen May were born in Co. Clare. They all only spoke English and could read and write. Kathleen May was a scholar. More information in R.I.C. barracks below.

 

R.I.C. Barracks

Note: Members of the R.I.C. were listed by their initials only. Names could be found from other sources such as enumerators.

D. B. (Daniel Brougham) (40). He was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Westmeath. He could read and write but spoke only English. He was a sergeant in the R.I.C. but was a farmer’s son before joining. M. R. (27) was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway. He spoke Irish and English and could read and write. He was a constable in the R.I.C. and was a farmer’s son before joining. M. McK. (22). He was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Kerry. He spoke only English and could read and write. He was a constable in the R.I.C. and was a farmer’s son before joining. The building was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and it had a stable, a coach house and 2 turf houses. The landholder was George H. O’Flaherty.

 

1901 Census for Ballyconneely

Overview of Ballyconneely in 1901

The 1901 census shows that there were a total of 31 houses in the townland of Ballyconneely and that 30 of those were occupied. House 31 was the Roman Catholic chapel, house 30 was the R.I.C. barracks, house 24 was the post office, house 26 was a public house and all the others were listed as being private dwellings. They were all constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and houses 12, 26, 27, 28 and 30 had slate, iron or tiled roofs while all the others had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. Houses 12 and 26 were 1st class dwellings, houses 5, 10, 14, 17, 18-20, 23, 24, 27, 28 and 30 were 2nd class dwellings, houses 8 and 29 were 4th class and all the others were 3rd class dwellings. Houses 8 and 29 had 1 room and no windows, houses 11, 21, 22 and 25 had 1 room and 1 window in the front, house 13 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 1 window in the front, houses 1-4, 6, 7, 9, 15 and 16 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 2 windows in the front. Houses 5, 10, 14, 17, 18-20, 23 and 24 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 3 windows, houses 28 and 30 had between 7 and 9 rooms and 5 windows, house 12 had between 10 and 12 rooms and 6 windows in the front and house 26 had between 10 and 12 rooms and 10 windows in the front. There were a total of 138 people in the townland, 73 males and 65 females and 3 males and 2 females were Protestant and all the others were Roman Catholic.

 

Malley                                     (additional surname: McCann)

The head of the first family in Ballyconneely was the widower Michael (70) and he shared the house with his son-in-law, Owen McCann (31), his daughter, Kate McCann (28) and his granddaughter, Mary (6). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English, except Mary, and Owen and Kate could read and write. Michael and Owen were both farmers. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable and a calf house. Michael Malley was the landholder.

 

Malley                                     (additional surname: Mulkerrin)

The widow Bridget (78) was the head of this family and she lived with her son-in-law, Thomas Mulkerrin (35), her daughter, Honor Mulkerrin (30) and 2 grandsons, Patrick Mulkerrin (2) and John Mulkerrin (9mths). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Bridget spoke only Irish and Thomas and Honor spoke Irish and English but only Honor could read and write. Bridget and Thomas were listed as being farmers. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable. Bridget Malley was the landholder.

 

Malley

The head of the family in house 3 was Patt (60) and he was married to Honor (58) and they shared the house with 4 of their sons, John (23), Thomas (22), Val (20) and Stephen (14). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English but only Stephen could read and write. Patt was a farmer and the sons were all listed as being farmer’s sons. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable and a cow house. Patt Malley was the landholder.

 

King

The widow Bridget (60) was the head of this family and she lived with her son Festus (34) and 4 unspecified relatives, Ellen (25), Ellen (3), Bernard (2) and Agnes (2mths)[iii]. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Bridget, Festus and Ellen (25) spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. Bridget was a farmer and Festus was listed as being a farmer’s son. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house and a calf house. Bridget King was the landholder.

 

Duane

The widower Thomas (75) was the head of this family and he lived with his son Thomas (26). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They could speak both Irish and English and read and write. Thomas (75) was a farmer and Thomas (26) was a farmer’s son. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable and a cow house. Thomas Duane was the landholder.

 

King

Michael (40) was the head of this family and he was married to Mary (38) and they lived with their married son, John (19). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and Mary and John could read and write. Michael was a farmer and John was a farmer’s son. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable and a shed. Michael King was the landholder.

 

Lacey                                      (additional surname: McIntre (sic))

Edward (68) was the head of the family in house 7 and he was married to Mary (70), and they shared the house with their son, Thomas (25) and their grandsons, James McIntre (sic) (17) and Patk McIntre (sic) (15). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and James and Patk could read and write. Edward was a farmer and Thomas was a farmer’s son. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable, a cow house and a piggery. Edward Lacey was the landholder.

 

Hopkin

Celia (59) was the sole occupant of house 8 and she was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. She spoke both Irish and English but could not read and she was a housekeeper. The house was a single roomed, 4th class dwelling and the landholder was Edward Lacey.

 

Dishel (sic)

Thomas (48) was the head of this family and he was married to Kate (43) and they shared the house with 4 of their children, Winifred (23), Michael (22), John (19), Thomas (11). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and all could read and write. Thomas (48) was a farmer, Winifred was a farmer’s daughter and the sons were farmer’s sons. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable and a cow house. Thomas Dishel was the landholder.

 

Conneely

John (75) was the head of this family in house 10 and he lived with his wife, Bridget (63). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They could speak both Irish and English but could not read. John was listed as being a farmer. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable and a piggery. John Conneely was the landholder.

 

Tierney

The head of this family was Thomas (95) and he was married to Anne (80). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They could speak both Irish and English but could not read. Thomas was a retired farmer. The house was a single roomed, 3rd class dwelling and the landholder was Harry McDonnell of Letterfrack.

 

O’Flaherty                                          (additional surname: Kean)

The head of this family was George E. (65) and he was married to Amelia (54) and they shared the house with 5 of their children and they were Mabel (20), George H. (19), Nancy (17), Monick (sic) (14) and Maude (9). There was also a servant, Bridget Kean (79). They were all born in Co. Galway, except Amelia, who was born in India, and they were all Roman Catholic. George E. and Bridget could speak Irish and English and the others all spoke English only. They could all read and write. George E. was a J.P. landed propretiter (sic) and Bridget was a domestic servant. The house was a 1st class dwelling with between 10 and 12 rooms and they had a stable, a coach house, a harness room, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a fowl house, a barn, a turf house, a potato house, a workshop, a shed and a store. George H. O’Flaherty was the landholder.

 

Madden

The widow, Bridget (34), was the head of this family and she shared the house with 2 of her daughters, Mary (13) and Bridget (11). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and they could all read and write. Bridget was a farmer and the girls were scholars. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable. Bridget Madden was the landholder.

 

Madden

Patrick (55) was the head of the family and he was married to Margaret (50) and they lived in the house with 4 of their children, Bridget (17), Tom (15), Margaret (13) and Honoria (5). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English except Honoria, who only spoke English. Patrick and Honoria could not read and the others could all read and write. Patrick was a farmer, Bridget was a seamstress, Tom was a farm servant and Margaret and Honoria were scholars. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable, a cow house and a shed. Patrick Madden was the landholder.

 

Conneely                                             (additional surname: Finnegan)

The widow Ellen (80) was listed as the head of this household and she lived with 2 lodgers, Kate Finnegan (57) and Charles Finnegan (12). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Ellen and Kate could speak both Irish and English. None of them could read or write. Ellen was listed as being a farmer. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house. Ellen Conneely was the landholder.

 

ODonnell

Patk (68), a widower, was listed as being the head of the family and he lived with 2 of his sons, John (28) and Michael (26). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English but only John and Michael could read and write. Patk was a farmer and John and Michael were listed as being farmer’s sons. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable and a shed. Patk ODonnell was the landholder.

 

Kelly                                       (additional surname: Melia)

The head of this family was the widow Kate (65) and she shared the house with her son-in-law, John Melia (35), her daughter, Anne Melia (30), 5 grandchildren, Mary Melia (7), Michael Melia (6), John (4), Kate (2) and Sarah (1) and a son, Peter (28). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Kate (65), John (35), Anne and Peter spoke Irish and English. Anne, Mary, Michael, John (4) and Peter could read and write. Kate (65), John (35) were farmers, Peter was a farmer’s son and Mary and Michael were scholars. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable and a cow house. Kate Kelly was the landholder.

 

King

The head of the family in house 18 was the widow Margaret (60) and she shared the house with 2 of her sons, Mark (30) and Peter (26). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English. Margaret could read only, Mark could not read and Peter could read and write. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and Margaret King was the landholder.

 

McDonagh

Mark (65) was the head of this family and he was married to Barbara (56) and they lived with their son, Thomas (22) and daughter, Katie (18). They were all Roman Catholic and Thomas was born in America while the others were all born in Co. Galway. Mark and Barbara spoke Irish and English and Thomas and Katie spoke only English. Barbara could read only and the others could read and write. Mark was a farmer, Katie was a farmer’s daughter and Thomas was a farmer’s son. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and Mark McDonagh was the landholder.

 

Uniacke                                               (additional surname: Malley)

The head of this family was the widower, John (75) and he lived with his son-in-law, Michael Malley (50), his daughter, Bridget Malley (48) and 3 grandchildren, Thomas Malley (18), Mary Malley (16) and Valentine Malley (7). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John, Michael and Bridget spoke Irish and English and Thomas, Mary and Valentine spoke  English only. John and Michael could read only and Thomas, Mary and Valentine could read and write. John and Michael were farmers, Thomas was a general labourer, Mary was a seamstress and Valentine was a scholar. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and John Uniacke was the landholder.

 

Reilly

The widow Mary (65) was the head of this family and she shared the house with her son Festus (30). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mary spoke only Irish and Festus could speak English only. Only Festus could read and write. Mary was a housekeeper and Festus was a general labourer. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with a single room and the landholders were the Irish Church Missions.

 

Moloney

The widow Mary (80) was the sole occupant of house 22 and she was a Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. She spoke Irish and English but could not read. Her occupation was listed as being a housekeeper. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with a single room and the landholders were the Irish Church Missions.

 

Billett

The head of this family was the widow Rosetta (40) and she shared the house with 4 of her children and they were Thomas (18), Charles (16), Maggie (12) and John (10). They were all Church of Ireland and Mary was born in England and the children were all born in Co. Kerry.  John could read only and all the others could read and write. Rosetta was a housekeeper, Thomas was a postman and Charles, Maggie and John were scholars. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and the landholders were the Irish Church Missions.

 

Knox                                       (additional surname: Lydon)

The head of this household was the single Jane (41) and she shared the house with a servant, Anne Lydon (17). Jane was a Methodist and was born in Kings Co.[iv] and Anne was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway. Both could read and write. Jane was a postmistress and grocer and Anne was a cook and domestic servant. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and Jane Knox was the landholder.

 

Hodgins

The sole occupant of house 25 was the widow Anne (57). She was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. She spoke both Irish and English but could not read. She was a housekeeper. The house was a single roomed, 3rd class dwelling and the landholder was Jane Knox.

 

O’Flaherty                                          (additional surnames: O’Malley and  Roche)

The widower Thomas (50) was listed as the head of this family and also in the house at that time were 5 of his children, Honoria Ellen (15), Kathleen (13), Thomas (10), Alice (7) and Michael J. (5), a brother-in-law, Mark O’Malley (60), a mother-in-law, Honoria O’Malley (84), a widow and a shop assistant John Roche (17). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic, apart from Thomas (50), who was born in Co. Kerry. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and all could read and write. Thomas (50) was a shopkeeper and farmer, the children were all scholars, Mark was a farmer, Honoria had no occupation and John was a shop assistant. The house was a 1st class dwelling with between 10 and 12 rooms and Thomas O’Flaherty was the landholder.

 

Kelly

Valentine (63) was the head of this family and he was married to Marie (49) and they shared the house with 9 of their children and they were, Mary Anne (26), Bernard (25), Bridget A. (23), Margaret (21), John (20), Honoria (17), Edward P. (14), Freda (12) and Matilda (9). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Valentine spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others and that could indicate that they only spoke English. They could all read and write. Valentine was a farmer, Mary Anne and Bridget were dressmakers, Bernard  and John were farmer’s sons, Margaret and Honoria were farmer’s daughters and Edward P., Freda and Matilda were scholars. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and Valentine Kelly was the landholder.

 

Brett                                        (additional surname: McDonnell)

The head of this family was Patrick (29) and he shared the house with his nephew, John (9) and a servant, Mary Anne McDonnell (50), a widow. All were Roman Catholic and Patrick and Mary Anne were born in Co. Mayo and John was born in Co. Galway. Patrick and Mary Anne spoke Irish and English and all could read and write. Patrick was a Catholic curate, John was a scholar and Mary Anne was a cook and domestic servant. The house was a 2nd class dwelling and they had between 7 and 9 rooms and the landholder was Joseph Gorham of Clifden.

 

McHugh                                  (additional surname: Reilly)

The widow Nanny (95) was listed as the head of this family and she shared the house with her daughter, the widow Annie Reilly (58). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They spoke only Irish but could not read. Nanny was a housekeeper and Annie was a general servant. The house they shared was a 4th class dwelling with 1 room. The landholder was George E. O’Flaherty.

 

Wrin

The head of this family was John Wrin (46) (information gotten from form H in the R.I.C. barracks below). He shared the house with his wife Kate (40) and their 8 children and they were, Maurice (14), Mary E. (12), Kathleen T. (11), Lillie (9), Frances J. (8), Marcella (7), John H. (5), William (3) and Margaret A. (10mths). They were all born in Co. Galway, except John, who was born in Co. Kerry, and all were Roman Catholic, except Lillie, who was born in Co. Clare. Apart from William and Margaret A., they could all read and write. John was a sergeant in the R.I.C., Kate was a house keeper and all the children, with the exception of baby Margaret A., were scholars. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 7 and 9 rooms and was part of the R.I.C. barracks. The landholder was George E. O’Flaherty.

 

R.I.C. Barracks

Note: Members of the R.I.C. were only listed in census’ by their initials but some could be identified from other sources, such as the Enumerators.

J.W. (John Wrin) (46) who was a Roman Catholic and born in Co. Kerry. He could read and write and was a sergeant in the R.I.C. and before joining he was a farmer’s son. J. H. (30). He was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Sligo. He could read and write and was a constable in the R.I.C. and before joining he was a farmer’s son. J.R. (27) who was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Cork. He could read and write and was a constable in the R.I.C. and before joining he was a farmer’s son. J.K. (John Kane) (24) and he was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Roscommon. He could read and write and was a constable in the R.I.C. and before joining he was a farmer’s son. B.M. (24) who was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Kerry. He could read and write and was a constable in the R.I.C. and before joining he was a farmer’s son. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 7 and 9 rooms and was part of the R.I.C. barracks. The landholder was George E. O’Flaherty.

 

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Ballyconneely

Mary Melia (O’Malley) – Application No. C/21 4300 – Ref. Cen S/11 / 291. The application was received on 27th June 1921 and at that time the address was given as Mr. Ml King, Foreglass, Ballyconneely, Co. Galway. Mary’s parents were given as Mathias and Margaret Melia (O’Malley). The residence in 1851 was Ballyconneely, in the Parish of Ballindoon, in the Barony of Ballynahinch, Co Galway. In the left hand margin, the names John, Val and Matt were written. The search was returned on 28th June 1921 with the handwritten notes saying:

Bartley Madden                      60yrs                           Head

Matt Maley                             28                                Son-in-law   Married 1847

Peggy Maley                           20                                Daughter         “           “

 

No return of Mary

 

Martin O’Donnell – Application No. C/21 1024 – Ref. Cen S/11 292. The application was received on 5th February 1921 with an address of Boolard, Roundstone, Co. Galway. Martins parents were given as Martin and Bridget O’Donnell (Madden). The residence at the time of the search was Ballyconneely, in the Parish of Ballindoon, in the Barony of Ballynahinch, Co. Galway. The search was returned on 11th February 1921 with hand written notes saying:

Martin and Bridget O’Donnell

No return of applicant Martin

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Ballyconneely

The main immediate lessor in Ballyconneely was Samuel Jones and he leased quite a number of tenements in the townland. He owned 331 acres and 35 perches of land with an annual ratable valuation of £166. He leased tenements the following people. Patrick Darcy leased a house for 10s, Festus Brennan leased a house and offices for 10s, Michael Fitzpatrick leased a house and offices for 7s, Mary Anne King leased a house for 6s, Martin Mealy leased a house and offices for 7s and Mary Heeney (sic) leased a house for 5s. There was a vacant house with offices with an annual ratable valuation of £1, John McDonagh leased a house and offices for £1, Patrick Hadley leased a house for 5s, John Burke leased a house 7s, John Erris (sic) leased a house and offices for 7s, James Davin leased a house for 8s, Edward McCue leased a a house for 10s and Stephen Mealy leased a house and offices for 6s. Jane Mealy leased a house for 5s, Matthias Kelly leased a house for 7s and Festus Neal leased a house and offices on 11 acres, 2 roods and 18 perches of land for £4 for the land and 10s for the buildings. The Rev. Roderick Ryder leased a house and offices on 5 acres, 3 roods and 38 perches of land from Mark Gorham for £1 16s for the land and £2 for the buildings, the constabulary force leased a police barracks and small garage from Mark Gorham for £1 10s, Mark Gorham paid a half annual rent of £5. Mark Gorham leased 2 tenements from Samuel Jones, the first was a house and offices on 13 acres, 2 roods and 15 perches of land for £3 10s for the land and 10s for the buildings and a second of a pound on 25 perches of land that had no valuation listed. Bridget Gorham leased a house from Mark Gorham for 6s annually, John Conneely leased a house from Mark Gorham for 8s. Patrick McDonough leased a house and offices on 23 acres, 3 roods and 7 perches of land for £7 5s for the land and £1 5s for the buildings. Michael Nee leased a house from Patrick McDonough for 7s, John McCue leased a house and offices on 35 acres and 27 perches of land from Samuel Jones for £10 10s for the land and £1 for the buildings, John Uniacke leased a house with a 1 rood and 20 perches garden for 3s for the garden and 7s for the house, Bartholomew Conery (sic) leased 7 acres, 2 roods and 28 perches of land from Samuel Jones for £3 5s and Anthony Kelly leased a house from Samuel Jones for 6s.

 

Samuel Jones was the immediate lessor of the following tenements. Matthias Kelly leased 14 acres, 3 roods and 17 perches of land for £6, John McDonough leased 21 acres, 1 rood and 25 perches of land for £9, Matthew Mullin leased a house for 5s, Patrick Conneely leased a house and office for 10s and Valentine Conneely leased a house for 7s. Mark Conery (sic) leased a house and office for 13s, John Kelly and Peter Kelly jointly leased houses and offices on 22 acres, 3 roods and 35 perches of land for £4 10s each for the land and John paid £1 for a house and office and Peter paid 12s for his buildings. Matthias Conneely leased a house from John Kelly for 7s. William Parr leased 2 plots from Samuel Jones, the first was a house and offices on 8 acres, 1 rood and 20 perches of land for £2 15s for the land and £1 5s for the buildings and 3 acres and 3 roods of land for £1. Rev. Broderick Ryder leased an orphan house from William Parr for 10s annually, Henry Hogan leased a house and small garden from William Parr for 12s, Michael Mealy leased a house and office on 20 acres, 3 roods and 33 perches of land from Samuel Jones for £8 10s for the land and £1 for the buildings, Michael Conery (sic) leased a house from Michael Mealy for 10s. Cecilia O’Donnell leased a house and office from Michael Mealy for 10s and Michael Walsh leased a house from Michael Mealy for 7s. The next 16 tenements were leased from Samuel Jones. Stephen McDonough leased a house with 30 perches of a garden for 1s for the garden and 10s for the house, Michael Walsh leased 19 acres, 3 roods and 12 perches of land for £6. Michael Conry paid 15s for a house and office, Bridget King paid 8s for a house, Patrick Mealy paid 7s for a house, Bridget Kelly paid 5s for a house, Mary Walsh paid 7s for a house and Thomas Walsh paid 10s for a house and office. Edward Kelly paid 10 shillings for a house and office, Martin Early paid 7s for a house, James Keane paid 10s for a house and office, Michl Conery (sic) (Mick) and Patrick Mealy paid £2 17s each for the use of 18 acres, 3 roods and 15 perches of land, Valentine and Patrick Conneely each paid £1 10s for their use of 18 acres, 2 roods and 13 perches of land. Martin O’Donnell paid £2 10s for 19 acres, 3 roods and 33 perches of land and 10s for a house. William Madden paid £1 12s for 16 acres, 1 rood and 16 perches of land and 8s for a house and Patrick King paid £1 7s for 18 acres, 1 rood and 7 perches and 8s for a house.

 

Valentine Madden leased a house and office for 10s from Patrick King and 19 acres, 1 rood and 15 perches of land for £1 15s from Samuel Jones. Samuel Jones owned 20 acres, 1 rood and 18 perches of land with an annual ratable valuation of £1 10s and 19 acres and 3 roods of land with an annual ratable valuation of £1 6s. Samuel Jones leased the next 4 tenements to the following. Matthias Mealy paid £2 10s for 20 acres, 1 rood and 33 perches of land, Bartholomew Madden paid £2 5s for 22 acres and 9 perches of land and 7s for a house and office, Martin Mealy paid £2 8s for 24 acres and 23 perches of land and Patrick Mealy (Morgan) paid £4 10s for 12 acres and 33 perches of land and 6s for a house.

 

There was a vacant house belonging to Patrick Mealy (Morgan) with an annual ratable valuation of 5s. Luke Corbett leased a house on 10 acres, 1 rood and 8 perches of land for £4 for the land and 8s for the house, John Connolly leased a house from Luke Corbett for 7s. Stephen Mealy and James Keane jointly leased 23 acres, 3 roods and 31 perches of land for which they each paid £4 4s for. John Gibbons and Thomas O’Donnell each leased a house on jointly leased land of 2 acres and 24 perches for which they each paid 3s for the land and 2s for the house. Samuel Jones owned 2 plots of land, 1 of 88 acres, 3 roods and 23 perches with an annual ratable valuation of £15, and the other, 171 acres, 1 rood and 13 perches £1 15s. Hamilton Smythe leased a house and offices on 147 acres, 3 roods and 26 perches of land from William B. Smythe for £23 10s for the land and £ 2 5s for the buildings. There were also 119 acres, 1 rood and 31 perches of water in the townland.

 

1670 Down Survey for Ballyconneely

The 1670 Down Survey name for this area was Ballymackanoola. The 1641 owner was the Catholic Murrogh O’Flahartye and in 1670 the owner was Edward Geoghegan, also a Catholic. There were 752 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 34 plantation acres of profitable land and 34 plantation acres were forfeited.

[i] Most likely Grandchildren

[ii] County Offaly

[iii] Ellen (25) possibly Bridget’s daughter-in-law and the children could be Grandchildren.

[iv] County Offaly

This page was added on 24/04/2018.

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