Ballynaheskeragh – Baile na hEiscreach- Town of the Ridge (of Sand Hills)

While the standard name was given as Ballynaheskeragh, there were many variations in the spelling of this townland as shown in the Ordnance Survey Name Books.  Ballanyscraigh and Ballyneheskeragh were the versions used in the reign of James I (1603-1625). The name was written Ballyneheskeragh in the time of Charles I (1625-1649) and Ballynehiskeragh while William III reigned (1689-1702).  The County Book showed Ballinaheskeragh.  The Irish form as given by O’Donovan was Baile na hEiscreach, which he translated as town of the ridge (of sand hills).  The same version of the name is given by the Irish Placenames Commission.  George D.H. Kirkaldy wrote the name as Ballynahesgragh and Rev. Francis Coghlan used Ballynahisera.

Location

Heathlawn, Derradda South, Lismahill, and Treenanearla in Killimorbologue, and Sheenarush, Cooldoragha, Gortluskin and Coolpora in Lickmolassy, border this townland.  The Ordnance Survey Name Books stated that this townland contained a number of farm- houses, several lime kilns, a trigl. station a large portion of fir planting in belts, and a small portion of bog.

Census 1841, 1851

Of the townlands in Killimorbologue, according to census Statistics in 1841, it ranked fourth in terms of population, with two hundred and sixty five people and fifty houses.  By 1851, post-famine census statistics showed the numbers had dwindled to one hundred and twenty eight people and twenty three houses, a 50% decrease in population.

Griffith’s Valuation 1855

Griffith’s Valuation recorded the total acreage as four hundred and thirty one acres, one rood and thirteen perches of land, and the total annual valuation as £178.10s.0d.  The landowner was the Marquis of Clanricarde who owned most of the land.   This land he leased out in ten holdings, the largest amount of two hundred and thirty acres, three roods and twenty eight perches being rented by George Saunderson.  The latter owned a house, four acres and twenty perches of land, which he leased out to John Kelly.  Among the other occupiers were Thomas Mannion, Patrick Barry, Arthur Killeen, Timothy Quin, Daniel Larkin, Michael Lantry, Michael Tierney, John Quin and Patrick Tracey.   Patrick Barry held sixteen acres and thirty four perches of land, while each of the others held a house, office/offices (sheds) and land.  The fifteen acres, three roods and thirteen perches of bog were leased out to George Saunderson, John Kelly, Thomas Mannion, Patrick Barry, Arthur Killeen, Timothy Quin, Daniel Larkin, Michael Lantry, John Quin and Patrick Tracey at a total annual valuation of £0.1s.0d each.

Census 1861, 1871, 1881, 1891

Census statistics listed fifty four people living in twelve houses in 1861, this increased to seventy five people residing in fifteen houses in 1871, and by 1881 the number of people declined again to sixty seven people occupying thirteen houses.  In 1891, fifty three people occupied eleven houses.

1901 Census

Nine houses were recorded in Ballynahiskeragh in 1901.

Patrick Carey

Ballynaheskeragh townland is in the electoral division of Portumna and in 1901 Patrick Carey was listed as head of family in house 1 in Form A of the census.

He was a 58 year old farmer, who could not read and was married to Matilda, aged 45.  Their son, Thomas, 9, was a scholar and he and his mother could read.  They were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.

Form B 1 – House and Building Return recorded that Patrick Carey’s 2nd class private dwelling was built on his own land.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was slate/iron or tiles.  It had 3 front windows and they occupied 2 rooms.

Form B 1 showed they had 4 out-offices and Form B 2 – Return of Out-Offices and Farm- Steadings could not be accessed.

Patrick Carey’s mark x on the census form was witnessed by Constable Patrick Mawn who was the Enumerator.  The form was collected on April 2nd.

James Elliott 

Form A for Ballynaheskeragh showed the Elliott family and their visitors in house 2 in 1901.  James Elliott, 56, was given as head of family, a farmer and married to Jane, 55.  Listed as farmer’s sons were James, 24, and William, 21, and they were not married.  Their daughter Frances, 16, was given as farmer’s daughter and she too was not married.  Two other sons, Joseph, 13, and Henery, 11, were scholars.  Their 2 visitors were George Scarlet, 36, whose occupation was general/servant domestic and his wife, Lizzie Scarlet, 30, who was a butler/domestic servant.  Their religious profession was given as Irish Church, they were  born in Co. Cavan and could read and write.

Form B 1 showed that they had 3 out-offices but Form B 2 was not accessible to identify them.

James Elliott’s 2nd class private dwelling was built on his own holding.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was slate/iron or tiles.  They occupied 4 rooms and the house had 2 front windows.

James Elliott signed the census form which was collected on April 2nd. Constable Patrick Mawn was the Enumerator.

Martin Fitzgerald 

House 3 was occupied by the Fitzgerald family.  Martin Fitzgerald was head of family and he was a 42 year old farmer.  He was married to Ellie, 28.  They had 2 sons and 1 daughter.  Michael Francis was 3, and Joseph Patrick was 2.  Their daughter, Mary Delia, was 8 months.  They were born in Co. Galway and the parents could read and write.

Form B 1 showed that Martin Fitzgerald’s 2nd class private dwelling was built on his own land.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was thatch or wood.  It had 3 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms.

They had 3 out-offices but Form B 2 was not accessible to identify them.

Martin Fitzgerald signed the census form which was collected on April 2nd.   Patrick Mawn Constable, was the Enumerator.

John Starr

The 9 members of the Starr family lived in house 4 in 1901.  John Starr, 53, was the head of family and a farmer.  He was married to Bridget who was 44.  Their children were Patrick, 20, John, 18, Mary, 16, Ellin (sic), 14, Bridget, 12, Thomas, 10, and Margaret who was 7.  They were listed as farmer’s sons and daughters and were all single.  John could not read while Bridget could read only.  All the children could read and write except Margaret, who could read only.   Bridget, Thomas and Margaret were scholars.  The family was Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.

Form B 1 showed that John Starr was a landholder and his 2nd class private dwelling had walls of stone/brick or concrete and roof of thatch or wood and 3 front windows.

They occupied 3 rooms and had 3 out-offices which cannot be named as Form B 2 was not accessible on line.

John Starr signed the census form which was collected on April 2nd.  Patrick Mawn, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Denis Quirke

Head of family in house 5 was Denis Quirke who was a 60 year old farmer, a widower and he spoke English and Irish but could not read.  His son, James, 40, listed as farmer’s son could read and write and was married to Anne, 32, and they both could read and write.  Denis’s daughter, Thresa, 22, was not married and was recorded as farmer’s daughter and could read and write.  His grandson, Michael, was aged 1 and his granddaughter, Mary, was 8 months old.

Form B 1 showed that Denis was the landholder on whose land his 2nd class private dwelling was built.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was slate/iron or tiles and it had 2 front windows.  They occupied 5 rooms.

Form B 1 showed Denis had 5 out-offices which were not named as Form B 2 was not available on line.

Denis Quirke signed the census form which was collected on April 2nd.  Constable Patrick Mawn was the Enumerator.

Michael Barry

Form A of the 1901 census showed Michael Barry, 39, a farmer and his family in house 6.  Michael was head of family and was married to Honoria, 37.  They both spoke Irish and English and Michael could read and write.  Their son, William, was 4.  Their daughter, Mary, was 2.  Michael Burke, given as father-in-law, was 75, a gardener and was a widower.  He could not read but spoke English and Irish.  They were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway

Michael Barry was the landholder on whose land their 2nd class private dwelling was built.  The house had walls of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was thatch or wood with 3 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms.

Form B 1 showed they had 6 out-offices but Form B 2 was not available on line to identify them.

Michael Barry signed the census form and Patrick Mawn, Constable, was the Enumerator.  The form was collected on April 2nd.

Joseph Mannion

Joseph Mannion occupied house 7 in 1901 in the townland of Ballynaheskeragh.  He was 35, a shopkeeper and farmer and listed as head of family.  He was married to Margaret, 30, a shopkeeper, and they both could read and write.

Form B 1 showed Joseph Mannion was the owner of the land on which his 2ndclass private dwelling and shop were built.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was thatch or wood.  It had 3 front windows and they occupied 4 rooms.

Form B 2 was not available to list the 6 out-offices with house 7.

Joseph Mannion signed the census form which was collected on April 2nd.  Constable Patrick Mawn was the Enumerator.

Michael Hogan

Michael Hogan, 54, was head of family in house 8.  He was an agricultural labourer and was married to Bridget, 43.  Their son, William, 14, was also listed as agricultural labourer and their daughter, Agnes, 11, was a scholar and all the family could read and write.  They were Roman Catholic and all except Michael were born in Co. Galway.  He was born in Co. Tipperary.

Form B 1 House and Building Return showed that James H. Monaghan, 29 Fitzwilliam Square, was the land holder on whose land Michael’s 2nd class private dwelling was built.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was slate/iron or tiles.  It had 2 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms.

They also had 2 out-offices but Form B 2 was not available to list them.

Patrick Mawn, Constable, was the Enumerator and Michael Hogan signed the census form which was collected on April 2nd.

Thomas Keating

Thomas Keating, aged 17 years and head of family, occupied house 9 in 1901. He was an agricultural labourer and not married.  He could read.

His 2nd class private dwelling was built on the lands of James H. Monaghan, 29, Fitzwilliam Square, Dublin.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was slate/iron or tiles.  It had 2 front windows and he occupied 3 rooms.

No out-offices were listed.

Constable Patrick Mawn was the Enumerator and he witnessed Thomas’s mark x on the census form which was collected on April 2nd.

1911 Census

Seven houses were listed in Ballynaheskeragh in the 1911 census, the recorded names remaining the same as those in 1901.  However the names Hogan, Keating and Monaghan no longer appeared.

Patrick Carey

Patrick Carey was listed in the 1911 census, in house 1, in Ballynaheskeragh townland, which was in the Portumna Electoral Division.  Patrick was a 79 year old, farmer, head of family and was married to Matilda, aged 63, for 30 years with 1 living child.  Their son, Thomas, 23, was a farmer, single, and could read and write.   Patrick could not read while Matilda could read. They were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.

Form B 1 showed Patrick Carey was the landholder on whose land their 2ndclass private dwelling was built.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was slate/iron or tiles.  It had 3 front windows and the family occupied 3 rooms.

Form B 2 listed a stable and a cow house as out-offices for house 1.

Patrick Carey’s mark x was witnessed by J.M. Mullooly, Constable, who was also the Enumerator.   The census form was collected on April 18th.

John Starr

In house 2, in the 1911 census, John Starr was given as head of family.  He was a 65 year old farmer and could not read.  He was married to Bridget, 55, for 31 years and she could read and write.  They had 8 living children.  Their 2 sons, John, 28, and Thomas, 20, were listed as farmers and were single as was their daughter Margret, 18.  All 3 children could read and write.  They were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway.

John Starr’s 2nd class private dwelling was built on his own land and the walls were of stone/brick or concrete with slate/iron or tiled roof.  It had 3 windows to the front and they occupied 5 rooms.

Form B 2 showed their 8 out-offices were: a stable, a coach house, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a fowl house, a shed and a barn.

John’s mark x on the census form was witnessed by J.M. Mullooly, who was the Enumerator.  The form was collected on April 18th.

Michael Barry 

Form A of the 1911 census showed the residents of house 3 as that of the Barry family and the head of family was Michael Barry, aged 50, a farmer, and he could read and write.  He was married to Honoria, 49, for 14 years with 2 living children.  Honoria could not read.  Their son, William, 13, listed as farm servant, was single and their daughter, Mary, 12, was a scholar.  The children could read and write.  They were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.

Form B 1 showed house 3 was built on Michael Barry’s own holding.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was thatch or wood.  It had 3 windows to the front and they occupied 3 rooms.

Their 7 out-offices were listed on Form B 2 as: 1 stable, 1 coach house, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Michael Barry signed the census form and J. M. Mullooly, Constable, was the Enumerator.

The form was collected on 18th April.

James Quirke

House 4 in Ballynaheskergh townland in 1911 was that of James Quirke who was listed as head of family.  He was a 48 year old farmer and was married to Anne, aged 40, for 12 years and they had 5 children with 3 still living.  Both could read and write. Their son, Michael, 11, and daughter, Mary, 10, were listed as scholars and they could also read and write.  Their other daughter, Margaret, 9, could not read.  James’s brother-in-law, Andrew Madden, aged 35, a farm servant, was single and could not read.  They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic.

Form B 1 showed that James Quirke was the landholder on whose land his 2ndclass private dwelling was built.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was slate/iron or tiles and it had 2 front windows.  They occupied 4 rooms.

Form B 2 listed their 6 out-offices: a stable, a coach house, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.

James Quirke signed the census form which was collected on April 18th and J.M. Mullooly, Constable, was the Enumerator.

James Elliott

The 1911 census showed James Elliott as head of family in house 5 in 1911.  He was a 67 year old farmer and was married to Jane for 46 years.  They had 12 children born alive and 8 still living.  Their 2 sons, Joseph, 22, and Henry, 21, were farmers and single.  They could all read and write and were born in Co. Cavan.  Their religion was given as Irish Church.

Form B 1 showed that James Elliott was the landholder where his 2nd class private dwelling was built.  The house had stone/brick or concrete walls and the roof was slate/iron or tiles.  It had 2 front windows and they occupied 5 rooms.

They had 9 out-offices listed on Form B 2: a stable, a coach house, a cow house, a calf house, a dairy, a piggery, a fowl house, a boiling house and a barn.

James Elliott signed the census form and J. M. Mullooly, Constable, was the Enumerator.

It was collected on 18th April.

Martin Fitzgerald

Residents of house 6 in 1911 were the Fitzgerald family.  Form A of the census showed Martin Fitzgerald as head of family.  He was a 59 year old farmer and was married to Ellie, 36, for 14 years with 7 children still living.  Listed as scholars, were their sons, Michael Francis, 13, and Joseph, 12, both of whom could speak Irish and English.  Their daughter, Mary Delia, 10, son, John Patrick, aged 9, and daughter Eleanor Florence, aged 6, were also given as scholars.  They could all read and write except Eleanor Florence.  Their 2 youngest sons, James, 4, and Francis, 2, could not read.

Martin Fitzgerald was the holder of the land on which their 2nd class private dwelling was built.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was thatch or wood.  It had 3 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms.

Form B 2 showed that house 6 had 6 out-offices: a stable, a coach house, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery and a fowl house.

Martin Fitzgerald signed the census form and J. M. Mullooly, Constable, was the Enumerator.  The census form was collected on April 18th.

Joseph Mannion

Form A in the 1911 census listed Joseph Mannion, 45, as head of family in house 7.  He was a farmer and married to Margret, 38, for 13 years, with no children.  They both could read and write and were Catholic.

Joseph Mannion’s 2nd class private dwelling was built on his own land.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was thatch or wood.  It had 3 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms.

Their 8 out-offices listed on Form B 2 were: a stable, a coach house, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a fowl house, a barn and a store.

Joseph Mannion signed the census form which was collected on April 18th.

The Enumerator was J. M. Mullooly, Constable.

 

This page was added on 16/02/2017.

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