Kilnamullaun – Coill na mBullán – Wood of the Young Bulls – Coill na Mullán

The Ordnance Survey Name Books gave the standard name as Kuilenamullawn and Kilnamullaun.  The Irish version given was Coill na mBullán, meaning wood of the young bulls.  Rev. Francis Coghlan spelled the name Kilenamullane, while George D.H.Kirkaldy wrote Kilnamullane.  Its official Irish spelling today is Coill na Mullán.

Location

It is positioned between Clarary, Rathmore Demesne and Coolbawn West in Killimorbologue, and by Lisduff and Rayconnor in Tynagh parish.  In the 1830s it contained several farmhouses, limekilns, lime stone quarries, two enclosures (Danish forts) and a trigl. station.  The land was all arable.

Census 1841, 1851

Census statistics listed the presence of nineteen houses and a population of one hundred and twenty one in 1841.  This figure was reduced to thirteen houses with a population of sixty four by 1851.

Griffith’s Valuation 1855

Griffith’s Valuation recorded fifteen holdings in Kilnamullaun, all of which were leased out by the landowner James McDermott, who owned one hundred and sixty eight acres, two roods and twenty two perches, at a total annual valuation of £87.16s.0d.  The occupiers who held land only were named as Patrick Ferguson, Martin Moran and Robert McDermott.  Edward Cohen (of Clarary) held thirty seven perches of garden.  Those who held a house and land were Thomas Brennan, Patrick Carey, junior, Thomas Tobin, Patrick Martin and Patrick Winters, senior.  The remainder of the tenants held a house, office(s) and land and included Patrick Carey, senior, Patrick Winters, junior, Patrick Conway, Thomas Whelan, Hugh Blaney and Owen Gormley.  The largest holding consisted of thirty one acres, two roods and seven perches, another measured twenty two acres, two roods and four perches, while the smallest acreage was one acre, two roods and thirty-eight perches.

Census 1861, 1871, 1881, 1891

Census statistics recorded sixty two people in thirteen houses in 1861 and forty six people occupying ten houses in 1871.  There was an increase to fifty eight people occupying the ten houses in 1881.  By 1891 the number of people residing in the ten houses had declined to forty.

1901 Census

Nine houses were listed in the townland in the 1901 census, one of which was unoccupied.  .

Pat Winters

Form A of the 1901 census showed Pat Winters as head of family in house 1.  He was an 81 year old farmer and widowed and he spoke Irish and English.  Residing with him were his 3 unmarried children.  His son, Michael, listed as a miller, was aged 38 and another son, Pat, 34, was recorded as farmer’s son.  His daughter, Maria, 40, was  listed as farmer’s daughter.  A farm servant named Martin Regan, 25, and a general servant, Bridget Noonan, 17, were not married.  All the household were Roman Catholic and could read and write and were born in Co. Galway.

Pat Winters was the landholder where his 2nd class private dwelling was built.  The roof was thatch or wood and the walls were stone/brick or concrete.  They occupied 3 rooms and the house had 3 front windows.

Their 7 out-offices included a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a fowl house, a barn and a shed.

Pat Winters signed the census form which was collected on April 2nd.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

House 2

Form B 1- House and Building Return, showed that house 2 in Kilnamullaun was uninhabited in 1901 and no out-offices were listed.  The owner of the land where the house was built was Anthony Derivan.

Anthony Derivan

In house 3 in Kilnamullaun in 1901 Anthony Derivan was listed as head of family.  He was a 45 year old farmer and was married to Maria, aged 35.  Five of their children were scholars: Michael, 13, Mary, 11, Thomas, 9, Lawrence, 7 and John 5.  Their son Anthony was aged 4, Patrick was 2 and Joseph was 1 month old.  The parents and 3 children; Michael, Mary and Thomas, could read and write.

Anthony Derivan’s 2nd class private dwelling was built on his own holding.  The roof was thatch or wood and the walls were stone/brick or concrete.  It had 3 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms.

Six out-offices were listed with this building on Form B 2: a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.

Anthony Derivan signed the census form which was collected on April 2nd.   Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.  It was collected on April 2nd.

Patt Whelan

Form A showed Patt Whelan, aged 68, was head of family in house 4 in 1901.  He was married to Ellen aged 58.  Their daughter, Mary, aged 33 and their son, John, 32, were listed as farmer’s son and farmer’s daughter and were not married.  They all could read and write and were born in Co. Galway.  Their religious profession was given as Roman Catholic.

Form B 1 listed Patt Whelan as the landholder on whose land his 2nd class private dwelling was built.  The roof was thatch or wood and the walls were stone/brick or concrete.  It had 3 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms.

Their 6 out-offices were a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a barn and 2 sheds.

Patt Whelan signed the census form and Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.  The form was collected on April 2nd.

Philip Carolan

Philip Carolan was given as head of family in house 5 in the 1901 census return, Form A.  He was a 58 year old farmer and was married to Fanny, aged 60.  Their son John, 20, was described as a farmer’s son and was not married.  Their daughter, Mary, 25, described as farmer’s daughter was also not married.  They could all read and write.  Philip was born in Co. Meath and all others were born in Co. Galway.

Philip was the land holder where his 3rd class private dwelling was built.  The roof was thatch or wood and the walls were stone/brick or concrete.  It had 2 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms.

Their 4 out-offices consisted of a cow house, a calf house, a piggery and a shed.

Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.  Philip Carolan signed the census form which was collected on April 2nd.

Hubert Blaney

Hubert Blaney and his family were the residents of house 6 in 1901.  He was a 60 year old farmer and was married to Bridget, aged 40.  Their son Andrew, 17, was given as farmer’s son and their daughter Mary, 27, was given as farmer’s daughter and neither person was married.  They were Roman Catholic and all could read and write and were born in Co. Galway.

Hubert Blaney owned the land where his 2nd class private dwelling was built.  The roof was thatch or wood and the walls were stone, brick or concrete.  It had 3 front windows and they occupied 2 rooms.

A stable and a piggery were listed as out-offices on Form B 2.

As head of family, Hubert Blaney signed the census form which was collected on April 2nd.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Martin Connor

Form A of the 1901 census showed Martin Connor, aged 33, a farmer was married to Honor, 26, and they both spoke Irish and English.  Martin could not read and Honor could read only.  Their son, James, was 4 and daughter, Ellen, was 2.  Martin’s mother-in-law, Ellen, aged 68, was widowed.  She could not read or write and was listed as farmer’s mother-in-law and she spoke Irish and English.

Form B 1 showed their house, number 7, was built on Martin’s own land.  It was 3rd class with a thatch or wood roof and walls of stone/brick or concrete.  It had 2 front windows and they occupied 2 rooms.

Form B 2 listed a piggery as their out-office.

As head of family, Martin Connor’s mark x was witnessed by Jno. E. Harte, Constable, who was also the Enumerator.  The form was collected on April 2nd.

Edward Coen

Head of family, but the only resident in house 8, on the night of the census, was Edward Coen.  He was 48, an RIC pensioner and was not married.  He could read and write and was Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway.  He spoke Irish and English.

Edward owned the land where his 2nd class private dwelling was built.  He occupied 3 rooms.  The house had a thatch or wood roof and the walls were stone/brick or concrete.

His 5 out-offices were a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a barn and a shed.

Edward Coen signed the census form which was collected on April 2nd.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Pat Keary

Pat Keary and his 3 sisters were residents in house 9 in 1901.  Pat was aged 30, a farmer, not married and was head of family.  His 3 sisters, described as farmer’s sisters, were Mary aged 40, Catherine, 37, and Ellen, 25, and were not married.  They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic and all could read and write.

The house was built on Pat’s own land and was listed as 2nd class with a thatch or wood roof and walls of stone/brick or concrete.  It had 3 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms.

Their 7 out-offices, listed on Form B 2, were a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a fowl house, a barn and a shed.

Pat Keary signed the census form which was collected on April 2nd.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

1911 Census

The 1911 census showed that the same surnames prevailed in the eight houses, with the name Pat Carey replaced by that of Catherine Carey.   The name Hubert Blaney was replaced by the name Michael Blaney.

Patrick Winters

House 1 on Form A of the 1911 census listed Patrick Winters, 44, as head of family.  His occupation was given as farmer/mill owner.  He was married to Catherine, 36, for 6 years and they had 3 children who were still living.  They could both read and write.  Their daughter, Bridget M, was 5, Annie J was 4 and Patrick G was 2.  Marie Winters, who was Patrick’s sister, aged 54 and single, also resided there.  They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic.

Patrick Winters was the holder of land where their 2nd class private dwelling was built.  The roof was thatch or wood and the walls were stone/brick or concrete.  It had 3 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms.

Their 5 out-offices included a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a barn and a shed.

Patrick Winters signed the census form which was collected on April 12th.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Catherine Carey

Listed on Form A of the 1911 census was Catherine Carey who was a 70 year old single farmer, was head of family in house 2.  Her 2 sisters, Ellen, 69, and Mary, 63, were also single.  Catherine could read and write but her 2 sisters could not read.  They were all Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway.

Form B 1 showed Catherine Carey was the owner of the land where her 2ndclass private dwelling was built.  The roof was thatch or wood and the walls were stone, brick or concrete.  Their 4 out-offices were a stable, a cow house, a fowl house and a barn.

Catherine Carey signed the census form which was collected on April 12th.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Anthony Dervin  

In 1911, in house 3, in Kilnamullain, Anthony Dervin, aged 55, was listed as head of family.  He was a farmer and was married for 26 years to Maria, aged 48.  They had 11 children with 10 still living.  Their son Michael, aged 23, was recorded as farm labourer.  Their daughter, Mary F was 21 years and another son, John F, was 15 and he was a scholar as was Anthony 14, Patrick, 12, Joseph ,10, and Ellen 8.  They were single and spoke Irish and English.  Their youngest daughter, Kathleen, 5, could not read while all the other family members could read and write.  Their religious profession was given as Roman Catholic and they were all born in Co. Galway.

Anthony Dervin was the holder of the land where his 2nd class private dwelling was built.  The roof was thatch or wood and the walls were stone/brick or concrete.  It had 3 front windows and they occupied 4 rooms.

Their 4 out-offices given on Form B 2 were a stable, a cow house, a calf house and a piggery.

Constable William Pender was the Enumerator.  Anthony Dervin signed the census form and it was collected on April 12th.

Michael Blaney 

On form A of the 1911 census Michael Blaney was listed as head of family in house 4.  He was 47 years old, a farmer and was single.  His mother Bridget, 72, and given as old-age-pensioner, was married for 54 years with 9 children and 7 still living.  His father, Hubert, also given as old-age-pensioner, was 74.  Michael’s sister, Mary, 43, was single and his brother Hubert, 33, listed as farm labourer, was also single.  They were all able to read and write.  They were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway.

Michael Blaney owned the land where his 2nd class private dwelling was built.  The roof was thatch or wood and the walls were stone/brick or concrete.  It had 3 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms.

Their 5 out-offices, listed on Form B 2, included a stable, a cow house, a piggery. a barn and a shed.

Michael Blaney signed the census form which was collected on April 12th.  Constable William Pender was the Enumerator.

Edward Coen

Edward Coen was listed on Form A of the 1911 census as an RIC pensioner/farmer.  He was 58 and was widowed.  He could read and write, was Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway.

House number 5 was given as 2nd class and was built on Edward Coen’s own holding.  The roof was thatch or wood and the walls were stone/brick or concrete.  It had 3 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms.

Form B 2 showed his 5 out-offices as a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.

Edward Coen signed the census form and William Pender, Constable was the Enumerator.  The form was collected on 12th April.

Philip Carolan

House 6 was the residence of the Carolan family and 2 visitors with the surname Coen.  Philip Carolan was 69, a steward, and was head of family.  He was married for 37 years, to Francis (sic), aged 69 and they had 2 living children.  Their daughter, Mary, 36, was single as was their son John, aged 30, and he was listed as farmer.  Annie and Edward Coen, both aged 8, and listed as visitors, were scholars.  All household members were able to read and write and were Roman Catholic and all, except Philip, were born in Co. Galway.  Philip was born in Meath.

Philip Carolan owned the land where his 3rd class private dwelling was built.  The roof was thatch or wood and the walls were stone/brick or concrete.  It had 2 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms.

Four out-offices were given on Form B 1 and Form B 2 listed them as a stable, a cow house, a fowl house and a barn.

William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.  Philip Carolan signed the census form which was collected on April 12th.

Patrick Whelan

House 7 on the census return for 1911 was that of the Whelan family.  Patrick was head of family and given as cottier and old-age-pensioner and was aged 81.  He was married for 48 years to Ellen, aged 70, and they had 2 living children.  Their daughter , Mary, 46, was a dressmaker and was single.  Their son, John, 45, a farm labourer was also single.  They could all read and write.  They were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway.

Patrick owned the land where his 2nd class private dwelling was built.  The roof was thatch or wood and the walls were stone/brick or concrete.  It had 3 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms.

Form B 2 recorded their 1 out-office as a fowl house.

Patrick Whelan signed the census form which was collected on April 12th.   William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Martin Connors

Resident of house 8 in the census returns was Martin Connors.  He was head of family, a farm labourer, aged 56, and he was married to Norah, 45, for 15 years and they had 2 living children in 1911.  Their son James, 14, and their daughter, Mary, 12, were listed as scholars and James spoke Irish and English.  They all could read and write, were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway.

Martin owned the land where his 3rd class private dwelling was built.  The roof was thatch or wood and the walls were stone/brick or concrete.

Their out-offices were a piggery and a fowl house.

Martin Connors signed the census form which was collected on April 12th.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

This page was added on 17/02/2017.

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