Killiane – Cill Liadhain – Liedania’s Church – Cill Liatháin

Killiane was the standard name given to this townland in the Ordnance Survey Name Books.  Spelling of the name varied.  In the reign of James I (1603-1625) it was referred to as Killaine and Killyane.  By the time of William III (1689-1702) it had become Killine and Killynana. The Irish version was recorded as Cill Liadhain, meaning Liedania’s Church.  It is listed today as Cill Liatháin.  Killiane was the version used by both George D.H. Kirkaldy and Rev. Francis Coghlan.

Location

The townland of Killiane lies between Aghany, Kilcrow, Laughile, Cloonoolish, Lisaniska North, Inga and Oxgrove.   The OS Name Books indicated that a large portion of this townland was inundated (flooded) by the Kuilecrow River.  The townland contained a few farmhouses, a limekiln, shrubbery, a large Danish fort, a small portion of bog and marsh with some arable land.  The Ordnance Survey Map, 1838, showed a Ferry (across the river to Aghany) and Burraderra Island.

Census 1841, 1851  

Census statistics showed twenty seven people residing in four houses in 1841, with a decline to eleven people occupying one house in 1851.

Griffith’s Valuation 1855

Griffith’s Valuation gave the area of the townland as one hundred and ninty six acres, two roods and eight perches. The landowners were Lord Dunsandle and Lord Clonbrock, who, between them, owned one hundred and ninety four acres, two roods and eight perches of land, at a total annual valuation of £83.5s.0d.  They leased out this land, on which there was a house and offices (sheds), to John Kirwan.  John Kirwan owned two acres of land, which he leased out to Patrick Coghlan, who did not live in the townland of Killiane.

Census 1861, 1871, 1881, 1891

Census statistics for 1861 showed sixteen people living in two houses.  By 1871 thirteen people occupied the two houses.   In 1881, similar to 1861, sixteen people resided in two houses. By 1891 there were 12 people living in 2 houses.

1901 Census

The 1901 census showed two houses in the townland, the landholder and head of each family were given as Bridget Kirwan and James Briscoe.

Bridget Kirwan

House 1 in the townland of Killiane, and in the Derrew Electoral Division, was the residence of Bridget Kirwan.   She was listed as head of family and was a 52 year old farmer who was widowed.  Her son, John, 22, was recorded as a farmer’s son and was not married.  Her daughter, Annie, 24, was given as farmer’s daughter and was not married.  Her nephew, John Cullen, 38, also a farmer’s son, was not married.  A domestic servant, Mary Burke, 13, was also a resident in the house.  They were all Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway.

Bridget Kirwan owned the land on which her 2nd class private dwelling was built.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was thatch or wood.  It had 3 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms.

Form B 1 showed their 8 out-offices as 2 stables, 1 coach house, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 barn and a store.

Bridget Kirwan signed the census form which was collected on 3rd April.  Michael Mulligan, Constable, was the Enumerator.

James Briscoe

On form A of the census, house 2, was listed as that of James Briscoe who was head of family.  He was 46 and his profession was given as farmer/horse trainer.  He was married to Bridget, aged 35.  Their son, James, 16, was a farmer’s son.  Their daughter, Mary, 8, was a scholar as was their son John, 5, and neither child could read.  All the other family members could read and write.  They were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway.

James Briscoe’s 3rd class private dwelling was built on his own holding.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was thatch or wood.  It had 2 front windows and they occupied 2 rooms.

Form B 1 listed their 2 out-offices as a cow house and a piggery.

James Briscoe signed the census form which was collected on April 3rd.  Michael Mulligan, Constable, was the Enumerator.

1911 Census

The 1911 census still showed two houses in Killiane.  John Kirwan was named as head of family and landholder in one house.  In the second case, Bridget Briscoe was listed as head of family and John Kirwan as the landholder.

John Kirwan

House 1, in 1911, in the townland of Killiane was given as that of John Kirwan who was head of family.  He was 34, a farmer and was married, for 6 years to Marianne who was 30 and they had 4 children living.  They could read and write.  Their 3 sons, James A, 5, Patrick, 4, and John Joseph, 3, were scholars.  Their daughter, Emily Mary, was 1 year old.  John’s sister-in-law, Lucy Agnes, 13, was a scholar who could read and write.  John Cullen, a first cousin, aged 56, was a general servant.  He was single and could read and write.  They were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway.

John Kirwan’s 2nd class private dwelling was built on his own holding.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was thatch or wood.  It had 3 front windows and they occupied 4 rooms.

Form B 1 showed they had 9 out-offices: 2 stables, 1 coach house, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 dairy, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and a barn.

John Kirwan signed the census form which was collected on April 4th.  J. M. Mullooly, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Bridget Briscoe

Form A of the 1911 census showed Bridget Briscoe as a 55 year old, widow and she was head of family.  Her son James, 26, a farm servant, was single.  Her daughter, Mary, 17, was single and her other son John, 15, was a farm servant.  They could all read and write.

Patrick Menehan, 60, was a farmer, single and could not read.  He was Bridget’s brother.  They were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway.

John Kirwan was the landholder on whose land Bridget’s 3rd class private dwelling was built.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was thatch or wood.  It had 2 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms.

Their out offices were a cow house and a piggery.

Bridget Briscoe signed the census form which was collected on April 4th.  J. M. Mullooly, Constable, was the Enumerator.

This page was added on 17/02/2017.

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