Lissaniska South- Lisaniska South – Lios an Uisce – Fort of the Water – Lissaniska South – Lios an Uisce Theas

The Ordnance Survey Name Books gave the standard name of this townland as Lisaniska South.  The same version was used by both George D.H. Kirkaldy and Rev. Francis Coghlan.  It is recorded as Lios an Uisce in Irish and today is called Lios an Uisce Theas and its official English version is Lissaniska South.

Location

It is bounded by Lisaniska North, Woodfield and Cloonoughmore in Kilquain or Quansborough, Muingbawn in the same parish, Kuilemore and Derradda in Killimorbologue.   In the 1830s the townland contained several farmhouses, limekilns, and a Danish fort in which children were interred.   It also contained a large portion of bog, a very small portion of planting, and some arable land. The road from Killimor to Eyrecourt formed the southern boundary.

Census 1841, 1851 

Census statistics recorded a population of one hundred and fifteen people in eighteen houses in 1841, reduced to sixty nine people occupying eleven houses by 1851, indicating a decline of forty six people and seven houses during that decade.

Griffith’s Valuation 1855

This townland consisted of five holdings at the time of Griffith’s Valuation.  Of the total acreage of six hundred and thirty acres, two roods and fifteen perches, the main landowner, William Usher retained one holding of three hundred and thirty three acres, two roods and five perches for his own use.  There was a herd’s house on this land.  He rented out the remainder of his land to three tenants, namely Patrick Calligly (sic), Michael Calligly and Michael Hobbs, who each held a house, offices (sheds) and land.  The other landholder, Allen Pollock, retained one hundred and ninety five acres, three roods and twenty two perches of land for himself, on which was a herd’s house.

Census 1861, 1871, 1881, 1891

Census statistics showed fifty three people living in nine houses in 1861, with a reduction to thirty people in seven houses in 1871.  There was an increase to thirty three people in seven houses in 1881, and a further increase to thirty nine people residing in six houses by 1891.

1901 Census

The prevailing names in the townland in the 1901 census were Michael Gibbons, Thomas Hagney, Thomas Callagy and Anne Hobbs, each listed as landholder and head of family, and John Campbell who was named as head of  family, the landholder being James Salmon. The five houses in the townland had a thatched roof, three had three windows in front, and the remaining two, had two windows in front.  The largest family had seven persons while the smallest had three.

Thomas Callagy

Thomas Callagy, his wife, Anne, and their 4 children were residents of house 4.  Thomas, head of family and a farmer, was 58 and Anne was aged 47.  Their children were: Patrick, 15, John, 13, Michael who was 12 and Mary J, the daughter was 8 years.  They were listed as scholars.  The family members were born in Co. Galway, were Roman Catholic and could read and write.

Their private dwelling, described as a 2nd class house, was built on Thomas’s holding.  There were 3 windows in front, a wood or thatch roof, stone, brick or concrete walls and 4 rooms were occupied by the family.

There were 5 out-offices on the holding: a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.

Thomas Callagy signed the census form which was collected on 9th April.  The Enumerator was named as Thomas McNulty, Constable.  The District Electoral Division was given as Kilquain.

John Campbell

John Campbell was 68 and his wife, Bridget, was aged 45 in 1901.  Their children were named as: Patrick, aged 22, Michael, 20, Mary who was 17, Martin, 15, and Honoria, aged 10 years.  John’s occupation was recorded as shepherd and that of his two older sons as shepherd’s sons.  Mary was listed as a shepherd’s daughter and Martin and Honoria were scholars.  All family members were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

James Salmon was the landholder on whose holding Campbell’s 3rd class house was situated.  Three rooms were occupied; there were 2 front windows, a thatch or wood roof, and the walls were of stone, brick or concrete.

Eight out-offices were listed: 1 shed, 1 barn, 1 fowl house, 1 piggery, 1 cow house, 1 calf house and 2 stables.

The Enumerator was Thomas McNulty, Constable.  The census form was signed by John Campbell and collected on 9th April.

Michael Gibbons

Michael Gibbons, his wife, Margaret, and their 3 sons, were residents of house 1 in Lissaniska South.  Michael and Margaret were both aged 60 and Michael’s occupation was given as farmer.  The older son, Francis, was 23, next was Joseph who was 21, and Bernard was 18.  Francis and Joseph were described as farmer’s sons and Bernard was a shop assistant.  Also in the house was Michael’s father, Owen, who was aged 84 and listed as farmer’s father.  All occupants were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.  Francis, Joseph and Bernard could read and write, whereas, Michael, Margaret and Owen were unable to read.

Michael Gibbons was the landholder on whose holding his house and 4 out-offices were situated.  The private dwelling, listed as a 3rd class house, had 2 rooms occupied by the family, 2 front windows, a thatch or wood roof and stone/brick or concrete walls.

The out-offices consisted of a cow house, a calf house, a piggery and a shed.

The census form was collected on 9th April.  Michael Gibbon’s mark x on the form was witnessed by the Enumerator, Thomas McNulty, Constable.

Lissaniska South was in the District Electoral Division of Kilquain but in the parish of Killimorbologue.

Thomas Hagney         

Thomas Hagney (sic) was a 48 year old farmer and a widow.  His daughter, Maria, aged 21, and listed as a farmer’s daughter, lived with him.  Also in the house was an agricultural labourer, named Patrick Treasy (sic) who was 14 years old.  All 3 were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.  Thomas and Maria were unable to read but Patrick could read and write.

Thomas’s 2nd class house was built on his own holding.  The walls were stone, brick or concrete, the roof was of thatch or wood: there were 3 front windows and 4 rooms.

Six out-offices were listed and they included a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a fowl house, and a shed.

Thomas’s mark x on the census form was witnessed by the Enumerator Thomas McNulty, Constable.  The form was collected on 9th April, 1901.

Anne Hobbs 

Anne Hobbs was a 60 year old widow.  Her 3 unmarried sons and daughter lived with her.  Anne was listed as a farmer and head of family, and her family as farmer’s sons and farmer’s daughter.  The older son, Martin was 30, Mary was 28, the second son, Michael, was 24 and Thomas was 18.  The family were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

Anne’s 2nd class house had brick, stone or concrete walls, a thatch or wood roof, 3 windows in front and 4 rooms.  This private dwelling, as well as 5 out-offices, were built on Anne’s holding.

The out-offices named were a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.

Anne Hobbs signed the census form which was collected on 9th April.  The Enumerator was Thomas McNulty, Constable.

1911 Census

The same surnames were recorded in the 1911 census, with the landholder Salmon, replaced by St. J. Ussher. The name Thomas Callagy, was replaced by Anne Callagy, and Anne Hobbs by that of Martin Hobbs.

Michael Gibbons  

Michael Gibbons, his wife Margaret, his father Owen and his son, Joseph, were listed as residents of house 4 in Lissaniska in 1911.  Michael and Margaret were both aged 70, were married for 49 years, had 11 children born alive, with 7 still living.  Michael was a farmer and head of family.  Owen was a widower who spoke Irish and English.  The 4 occupants were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and were recorded as being unable to read or write.

Gibbon’s private dwelling, a 2nd class house, was built on Michael’s holding.  Three rooms were occupied; there were 3 windows in front, the walls were of stone, brick or concrete, and the roof was thatch or wood.

The 3 out-offices on the holding were a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

Michael’s mark x on the census form was witnessed by J.M. Mullooly, Constable, who was the Enumerator.   The form was collected on 6th April.

Anne Callagy

Anne Callagy was a 60 year old widow and listed as head of family.  Her 4 unmarried children lived with her:  Patrick who was 25, John aged 23, Michael was 21 and Mary was 18 years.  The 5 family members were farmers, born in Co. Galway, were Roman Catholic and could read and write.

Anne’s 2nd class house was built on her own holding.  Four rooms were occupied by the family; the walls were brick, stone or concrete, the roof was thatch or wood and there were 3 windows in front.

Six out-offices stood on the holding: 1 barn, 1 fowl house, 1 piggery, 1 cow house, 1 calf house and 1 stable.

Anne Callagy signed the census form which was collected on 6th April.  The Enumerator was J. M. Mullooly, Constable.

John Campbell 

John Campbell was a 76 year old widower whose occupation was given as a shepherd.  Five family members lived with him: his son, Patrick aged 30, a second son, Michael, who was 28, Kate, his daughter 20, a younger daughter, Norah, 18 and his granddaughter, Delia, 3 years old.  All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.  John’s sons and daughters could read and write but John was unable to read.

The landholder, on whose holding Campbell’s house was built, was St. J. Ussher.  The private dwelling, a 2nd class house, had stone, brick or concrete walls, a thatch or wood roof, 3 front windows and 3 rooms.

Five out-offices were listed on the holding: a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.

J.M. Mullooly, Constable, was the Enumerator and he witnessed John Campbell’s mark x on the census form.  The form was collected on 6th April.

Thomas Heagney

Thomas Heagney and his wife Anne were married 1 year.  Thomas was 64 years and Anne was 32.  There were 2 others in the house: Thomas’s brother-in-law, Patrick Hanney, and his nephew, also named Patrick.  The older Patrick was a 68 year old widower and farmer, and the younger Patrick was an unmarried farm servant, aged 31 years.  All the occupants were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.  Thomas and his brother-in-law, Patrick, spoke Irish and English.

The Heagney private dwelling, listed as a 2nd class house, stood on Thomas’s holding.  Four rooms were occupied by the family; there were 3 front windows, a thatch or wood roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

There were 2 out-offices on the holding, a stable and a cow house.

Thomas Heagney signed the census form which was collected on 6th April.  The Enumerator was J.M. Mullooly, Constable.

Martin Hobbs

Martin Hobbs, his wife Mary, his mother, sister and brother were residents of house 5.  Martin was a 38 year old farmer and head of family.  Mary was aged 29.  Martin’s widowed mother, Anne, was 71; his sister, Mary was 32 and his brother, Michael, was 28 and listed as a farmer.  The Hobbs family were all Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

Martin Hobbs was the landholder on whose holding his house and out-offices were situated.  The private dwelling, a 2nd class house, had 3 rooms occupied by the family, a thatch or wood roof, stone/brick or concrete walls and 3 front windows.

Eight out-offices were listed on Form B 1 including a barn, a fowl house, a piggery, a cow house, a calf house, a coach house and 2 stables.

J.M. Mullooly, Constable, was the Enumerator.  The census form, signed by Martin Hobbs, was collected on 6th April 1911.

This page was added on 17/02/2017.

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