Rathmore Demesne – Rath Mór – Great Fort – An Ráth Mór

The standard name given in the Ordnance Survey Name Books was Rathmore Demesne.  Both George D.H. Kirkaldy and Rev. Francis Coghlan used the same version. The Ordnance Survey Name Books records it as Rath Mór but the Placenames Commission records it today as An Ráth Mór.

Location

The townland stretches between Kilbeg, Derrysiskal, Rathmore Ahanduff, Ahanduffmore, Coolbawn, Coolbawn West, Kilnamullaun and Clarary.  In the early 1800s it contained a Gentleman’s Seat and offices, several detached portions of planting, and a Danish fort called Lisheenlia.  The land was all arable, with the road from Loughrea to Killimor passing through. The Ordnance Survey Map showed Rathmore House (mansion), walled gardens and an earthwork.

Census 1841, 1851

Pre-famine census statistics for 1841 recorded thirty two people in three houses.  An increase in population of two people was noted in 1851 while the number of houses remained at three.

Griffith’s Valuation 1855

Griffith’s Valuation gave the acreage of Rathmore Demesne as three hundred and two acres, two roods and fifteen perches.  The landowner, James McDermott, retained two hundred and ninety eight acres for himself, at a total annual valuation of £223.10s.0d.  He had a house, offices (sheds) and a herd’s house on this land.  He rented out four acres, two roods and fifteen perches, at a total annual valuation of £3.10s.0d, to Patrick Conway, who did not live on the land.

Census 1861, 1871, 1881, 1891

Census statistics recorded eighteen people living in three houses in 1861, while fifteen people resided in the same number of houses in 1871.   An increase to twenty six people occupying three houses was recorded in 1881, while 1891 records show twenty seven people in four houses.

1901 Census

Three houses were listed in Rathmore Demesne in the 1901 census.  James MacDermott was named as landholder and head of family in the first instance.  In the second case he was named as landholder but Pat Barrett as head of family.  Finally, Pat Greany was both landholder and head of family.  Two of the houses had a slate roof; one house had twenty windows in front, the second had three windows and the third had two.

James MacDermott

Form A of the 1901 census shows 13 persons in house 1 and James MacDermott was head of family.  James was 63, and a landed proprietor and was married to Elizabeth Lucy, 48, who had no profession.  Their daughter Mary, 15 was a scholar as was Anne aged 9.  They were all born in Co. Galway except Elizabeth Lucy who was born in Lancashire, England.  They all could read and write.

Mary Margaret Rice, aged 23 was the governess and was born in Dublin.  She was single and could read and write.  Kate Keogh, 51, was a visitor and her profession was given as dressmaker and she was born in Wexford.  She was also single and could read and write.  Michael Bleany, aged 30, was single and listed as a gardener and could not read.  There were 4 servants who could read and write and were single; Bridget Winters, 26 was a housemaid, Mary Cormacan, 26 was a cook, Agnes McDonnell, 20 was a kitchen maid and Julia McDonnell, 18, was a laundress.  Unless otherwise stated all were born in Co. Galway.  All in the house were Roman Catholic.

Form B 1 – House and Building Return shows James MacDermott was the landholder on whose 1st class private dwelling was built.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was slate/iron or tiles.  The house had 20 windows to the front and they occupied 22 rooms.

Form B 2 Return of Out-Offices and Farm Steadings shows their 33 out-offices were: 11 stable, 2 coach houses, 1 harness room, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 dairy, 1 piggery, 2 fowl houses, 1 boiling room, 1 barn, 2 turf houses, 1 potato house, 1 work-shop, 4 sheds, 1 store, 1 forge and 1 laundry.

Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.    James MacDermott signed the census form.  It was collected on 3rd April.

Pat Greany

The surnames Greany and Conway appear on the 1901 census in house 2 in Rathmore Demesne.  Pat Greany was listed as head of family.  He was a 45 year old farmer’s herd, who would not read and was married to 60 year old Margaret Greany.  His brother William, 70, was not married.  An agricultural labourer named Peter Conway, 25, was also not married.  They were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic.  Margaret, William and Peter could read and write.

Form B 1 shows Pat Greany was the landholder and his 2nd class private dwelling was of stone/brick or concrete with thatch or wood roof.  It had 3 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms.

They had 5 out-offices listed on form B 1 which were a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.

Pat Greany’s mark x on the census form was witnessed by Jno. E. Harte, Constable, who was also the Enumerator and was collected on April 3rd.

Pat Barrett

In house 3 in Rathmore Demesne, Pat Barrett, 43, a slater and head of family is recorded.  His wife Mary was 35 years old.  Their son, Peter, 17, Pat 16, and daughters Bridget 11 and Mary aged 8 were scholars and all the family could read and write.  They were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway.

Form B 1 shows that Jas. MacDermott was the landholder on whose land Pat’s house was built.  It was 2nd class with 2 front windows.  It had walls of stone/brick or concrete with a slate/iron or tiled roof.  They occupied 2 rooms.

The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.  It was collected 3rd. April.  Pat Barrett signed the census form.

1911 Census

Thirteen persons are recorded in one family, six in the second and four in the third.

In the 1911 census three houses were still recorded in Rathmore Demesne.  James MacDermott was named as landholder and head of family, and as landholder in the other two instances, while Patk. Barrett and John Graney were named as head of family.

James MacDermott

Residents of house 1 in 1911 in Rathmore Demesne were James MacDermott, 73, who was listed as landed proprietor and J.P.O.L.  He was married to Lucy, 59, for 35 years with 7 children born and 6 still living.  Their son, James Robert, 30, was single.  Their daughter, Mary, 25, was also given as single. Also residing in the house was their cousin Maud Richards, 50, and her rank was given as wife of English clergyman and she had no children.  Both she and Lucy were born in Co. Galway.  Laurence Keelan, 45, was listed as coachman and domestic servant and was married.  James Sampson, 23, was a farm labourer and was a single man. Mary Cormacan, 33, was a cook and domestic servant and was also single.  Maria Broderick, aged 24, was a housemaid and domestic servant in the house and she was single as was Catherine Luchnane, 19, and her occupation was also given as domestic servant.  All in the household were Roman Catholic and all could read and write.

Form B 1 shows James MacDermott was the landholder and his 1st class private dwelling was of stone/brick or concrete with slate/iron or tiled roof.  The house had 20 front windows and they occupied 26 rooms.

Form B 2 records their 30 out-offices were: 3 stables, 2 coach houses, 1 harness room, 3 cow houses, 2 calf houses, 1 dairy, 2 piggeries, 2 fowl houses, 1 boiling house, 1 potato house, 1 workshop, 4 sheds, 1 store and 1 laundry.

James MacDermott signed the census form which was collected on 7th April.  Constable, William Pender, was the Enumerator.

Patrick Barrett

Form A, of the 1911 census, shows that house number 2 was the residents of the Barrett family.

Patrick Barrett, 63, a slater, was listed as head of family.  He was married to Mary, 58, for 32 years.  They had 4 living children.  Their son Peter, 28, also a slater, was single.
Another son, Patrick, 26, was a farmer and also single.  Two daughters, Bridget, 21, and Mary 18, were recorded as single in the census.  All the family could read and write.  They were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic.

Form B 1 shows Patrick Barrett’s 2nd class private dwelling was built on James MacDermott’s holding.  It had walls of stone/brick or concrete and slate/iron or tiled roof.  It had 2 front windows and 3 rooms were occupied.

No out-offices were recorded on Form B 2 for house 2.

Patrick Barrett signed the census form which was collected on 7th April.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

John Greany

Listed in house 3 in 1911 was a 26 year old John Greany, a shepherd, aged 26 and single.  He spoke English and Irish and was Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway.

Form B 1 records James MacDermott was the landholder on whose land John’s 3rd class private dwelling was built.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was thatch or wood.  The house had 2 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms.

Form B 2 lists their 4 out-offices as: a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.

Constable, William Pender, was the Enumerator and the census form was signed by John Greany and collected on 7th April.

This page was added on 17/02/2017.

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