Hearnesbrook Demesne – Hearnesbrook – An Bhuaile Bheag

The Ordnance Survey Name Books 1838 recorded the following: ‘This name is engraved Hearnesbroke Demesne, the 16 Sept. 1832’, and also recorded the standard name as Hearnesbrook.  George D.H. Kirkaldy and Rev. Francis Coghlan used the name Hearnesbrook Demesne.  The official Irish spelling of the townland is An Bhuaile Bheag.

Location

Moneenaveena, Killimor and Boleybeg, Caher and Ardane border the townland.  Among the features on the Demesne were Hearnesbrook House (Gentleman’s seat), some detached portions of planting, two sand pits, part of a lake and all the land was described as arable. The Ordnance Survey Map showed a gate lodge, an eel weir and Flower Island.

Census 1841, 1851

Census statistics 1841 listed a population of twenty seven people occupying three houses, while the same number of people resided in four houses in 1851.

Griffith’s Valuation 1855

Griffith’s Valuation gave the acreage as eighty three acres and twelve perches of land, with a total annual valuation of £110.0s.0d.   The landowner was George D. H. Kirkaldy who retained all the land for himself.  He had a house and offices on this land.

Census 1861, 1871, 1881, 1891

Census statistics gave the following information: forty people lived in six houses in 1861 and thirty one people occupied four houses in 1871.  There was a decline in population to twenty nine people living in five houses in 1881 and in 1891.

1901 Census

Mary Haverty

Form A of the 1901 census for Hearnesbrook Demesne townland lists Mary Haverty as head of family in house 1.  She was a 79 year old gate-keeper and was a widow.  She could not read.  She was Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway.

Form B 1 – House and Building Return listed G.J. MacKay of Hearnesbrook Demesne as the landholder on whose land Mary’s 3rd class house was built.  She occupied 2 rooms.  The house had 1 front window.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was slate/iron or tiles.

Form B 2 Return of Out-Offices and Farm-Steadings showed her 1 out-office was a piggery.

Mary Haverty’s mark x on the census form was witnessed by Jno. E. Harte, Constable, who was also the Enumerator.  The form was collected on April 2nd.

Michael Byrnes

House 2 in Hearnesbrook Demesne was listed as that of Michael Byrnes.  He was 40, a farmer, could read only.  He was married to Ellen, also aged 40, and she could read and write.

Also listed was John Hara, 18, who was a general servant and could read and write.

Form B 1 shows G.J. MacKay of Hearnesbrook Demesne as the landholder on whose land their 2nd class private dwelling was built.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was slate/iron or tiles.  The house had 5 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms.

Their 6 out-offices were listed on Form B 2 as: a stable, 2 cow houses, 1 calf house, a piggery and a fowl house.

Michael Byrnes’s mark x on the census form was witnessed by Jno. E. Harte, Constable, who was also the Enumerator and it was collected on 2nd April.

Malcolm Campbell

Malcolm Campbell was the occupant and head of family in house 3 in 1901.  He was 30, a gardener/domestic servant.  He was married to Elizabeth aged 25, and they could read and write.  Both were born in Scotland and their religion was given as Church of Scotland.

Form B 1 shows that house 3 was built on G.J. MacKay’s (of Hearnesbrook Demesne) holding.  It was 2nd class with walls of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was slate/iron or tiles.  It had 6 front windows and they occupied 2 rooms.

No out-offices were listed for house 3 on Form B 2.

Malcolm Campbell signed the census form which was collected on April 2nd.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

House 4

Form B 1 House & Building Return showed that house 4 in Hearnesbrook Demesne was not inhabited in 1901 and it was built on G.J. MacKay’s holding.

George Carr

Form A shows the Carr family of 6 people in house 5 in 1901.

George Carr was head of family, aged 39 years, and his occupation was given as coachman/domestic servant.  He was married to Mary, aged 38.  Their 3 sons: Edward, 12, James, 10, and Albert, 8, were listed as scholars and all could read and write.  Their 3 year old son, Arthur, was the only one born in Co. Galway and could not read.  All the other family members were born in Scotland.

House 5 on Form B 1 was listed as being on the holding of G.J. MacKay of Hearnesbrook Demesne.  It was 2nd class with walls of stone/brick or concrete and a roof of slate/iron or tiles.  It had 3 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms.

Their 9 out-offices were: 3 stables, 1 coach house, 1 harness room, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 turf house and 1 shed.

George Carr signed the census form and Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.  It was collected on 2nd April.

Pat Nevin

Form A showed Pat Nevin as head of family in house 6 in 1901.  He was 67, a general labourer and was married to Bridget 63.  Their daughter, also Bridget, 28, was a seamstress and was not married.  A nephew named Patrick Quigley, 19, was a general labourer and was not married.  All could read and write.  They were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.

Form B 1 showed that Pat Nevin’s 2nd class private dwelling was built on the holding of G.J. MacKay of Hearnesbrook Demesne.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was slate/iron or tiles.  It had 2 front windows and they occupied 2 rooms.

Their 4 out-offices were a cow house, a calf house, a piggery and a fowl house.

Pat Nevin signed the census form which was collected on 2nd April.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

1911 Census

Pat Nevin

In 1911, in the townland of Hearnesbrook Demesne, Pat Nevin was listed, in Form A, as head of family.  His age was given as 76 and he was widowed and his occupation was recorded as labourer.  With him, on the night of the census, was his son Patrick, 37, who was a labourer.  His daughter, Bridget, 39 was a streamstress and his grandson, Patrick Quigley, whose age was given as 31, was also a labourer and all 3 were single.  All the residents were able to read and write and were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.

Form B 1- House and Building Return – records Hunter Mackay as the landholder where Pat Nevin’s 2nd class private dwelling was built.  They occupied 2 rooms and the roof was slate, iron or tiles and the walls were stone/brick or concrete and it had 2 windows to the front.

Form B 2 – Return of Out Offices and Farm-Steadings – showed no out-offices for house 1.

Patrick Nevin signed the census form which was collected on April 7th.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Adam Aitken

House number 2 was the residence of the Aitken family in 1911.  Adam was listed as head of family and his occupation was given as coachman.  He was 41 and was married for 16 years to Elizabeth aged 43 and they had 4 children still living. Their 2 daughters, Mary aged 15 and Jane, 13, and son Adam, 10, were listed as scholars. All could read and write except their youngest son Duncan who was 5 and he was born in Co. Galway while all the others were born in Scotland.  Elizabeth spoke Galic (sic) and English and their religious profession was given as United Free Church.

Form B 1 lists Hunter Mackay as the landholder where Aitken’s private dwelling was built.  It was given as 2nd class and they occupied 2 rooms.  It had 2 front windows and the roof was slate/iron or tiles and the walls were stone/brick or concrete.

Form B 2 lists no out-offices for house 2.

William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator and Adam Aitken signed the census form which was collected on April 7th.

Helen Lawson

In house 3 in Hearnesbrook Demesne Helen Lawson, aged 60, signed Form A as head of family.  She was a servant and housekeeper and with her were 3 other servants: Susan Francis Duncan, aged 36, and her occupation was given as laundress; Iris Leslie, 22, who was a cook and Michael Clarke, 22, who was a groom.  They were all listed as single and all were born in Scotland except Michael Clarke who was born in Co. Galway.  All were able to read and write.  Michael Clarke’s religious profession was given as Roman Catholic and the 3 others were Church of Ireland.

Form B 1- House and Building Return listed Hunter & Mackay as the landholders and Lilian S. Mackay as head of family and their 1st class private dwelling had 26 rooms occupied in 1911. The house had 8 windows to the front, slate, iron or tile roof and the walls were of stone, brick or concrete.

Listed on Form B 2 – Return of Out-Offices and Farm-Steadings for this house were 32 out-offices: 4 stables, 3 coach houses, 1 harness room, 3 cow houses, 3 calf houses, 1 dairy, 2 piggeries, 2 fowl houses, 1 boiling house, 3 barns, 1 turf house, 1 potato house, 1 workshop, 4 sheds, 1 store and 1 laundry.

Helen Lawson signed the census form which was collected on April 7th.  Constable William Pender was the Enumerator.

Alexander Duncan 

Alexander Duncan and his family were the residents in house 4 according to Form A (Household Return).  Alexander was aged 40 and his occupation was given as steward.  He was married to Sarah, aged 42, for 5 years and they had 2 children.  Their daughter, Mary Ann, a scholar, was aged 11 and their son Robert Hector was 3 in 1911.  Their religious profession was given as United Free Church and they were all born in Scotland.

Form B 1 showed that Hunter & Mackay were the landholders on whose land the Duncan’s 2nd class private dwelling was built.  The house had 3 front windows, walls of stone, brick or concrete and the roof was slate, iron or tiles and they occupied 3 rooms.

No out-offices were given for house 4 on Form B 2.

As head of family, Alexander Duncan signed Form A (Household Return).  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator and it was collected on April 7th.

William Joss

Form A (Household Return) recorded William Joss, aged 31, and his wife Margaret 29 as residents in house 5.  William’s occupation was given as gardener/domestic servant.  Their religious profession was given as Church of Scotland and they were born in Scotland and they could read and write.

Form B 1- House and Building Return showed that Hunter & Mackay were the landholders where Joss’s 3rd class private dwelling was built.  They occupied 1 room and the house had 1 front window.  The roof was slate, iron or tiles and the walls were stone, brick or concrete.

Form B 2 – Return of Out Offices and Farm-Steadings shows no out-offices with house 5.

William Joss, as head of family, signed Form A and it was collected on April 7th.   Constable William Pender was the Enumerator.

House 6

Form B 1 – House & Building Return showed that there was 1 house listed as “building” in 1911 but it was uninhabited and Hunter & Mackay were the landholders.

 

This page was added on 17/02/2017.

No Comments

Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this page!

Add a comment about this page

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Share this
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone