Carrick West

An Charraig Thiar

Teresa Philbin

Carrick West/ An Charraig Thiar

Meaning: a rock

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838:

According to O’Donovan’s Field Name Books (1838) the standard name given to the townland was Carrick West and Carraig was the Irish form. Other forms of the name were Corrig West (Boundary Surveyors Sketch Map), Carrickeaaun (County Map), Corrick West (Meresman), Carirck West (Tithe Ledger), Carrick (Rev. Michael Waldron, P.P.) and Carrick West (County Cess Collector).

Situation: The townland of Carrick West is in the civil parish of Cong and in the barony of Ross in County Galway. It is situated in the north side of the parish and bounded on the north by the parish of Ross, on the west by Dooghta; south by Curnamona (sic) and on the east by Carrick Middle.

Description: The townland of Carrick West comprised of 336 acres, 1 rood and four perches.

Down Survey: The name for Carrick West in the Down Survey 1641 was Carowncarga (sic). It is in the parish of Cong and in the half barony of Ross. The landowner was a Catholic by the name of Teige O’Flaharty (sic) (Pre Cromwell). In 1670 the land was in the ownership of Dublin College (Protestant) and was held by John Brown a Protestant (Post Cromwell). The survey states there were 444 plantation acres of profitable land, the same number of acres of unprofitable land and 444 acres of land was forfeited.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838: O’Donovan reveals that the proprietor of the townland of Carrick West was Trinity College, Dublin. The agent was Alexander Nesbitt, Jnr. Esq., 96 St Stephen’s Green, South Dublin. The land was all held under lease and sublet to tenants for a bulked rent of £25 yearly. The soil was described as poor spent mountain and part a steep mountain with mixed and heathy (sic) pasture. The crops of oats and potatoes were poor. A straggling village was to the south side under mountain (sic). There was a school here. The County Cess of 11 ¼ d. was paid per acre for 100 acres. The Mill River runs between this and Curnamona (sic) village by the bridge in Curnamona.

Griffith’s Valuation (1855):

According to Griffith’s Valuation, Carrick West (Ord. S. 26) had a total acreage of 336 acres, 2 roods and 36 perches. The total annual valuation of rateable property for this area was £46.01s.0d.

Plot 1 was comprised of 132 acres, 2 roods and 2 perches. Rev. Ralph Sadleir (sic) was the immediate lessor. He sublet to nine tenants.

  • Bridget Givern (sic) had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £1. 10s. 0d. The buildings had a value of £0. 10s. 0d.
  • James Walsh had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £1. 10s. 0d. The buildings were valued at £0. 5s. 0d.
  • Edward Curran had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £2. 5s. 0d. The buildings were valued at £0. 8s. 0d.
  • Patrick Curran had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £2. 5s. 0d. The buildings were valued at £0. 8s. 0d.
  • Patrick Walsh had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £2. 5s. 0d. The buildings had a value of £0. 10s. 0d.
  • Michael Walsh had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £1. 10s. 0d. The buildings were valued at £0. 5s. 0d.
  • Honor Hobacun (sic) had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £2. 5s. 0d. The buildings were valued at £0. 10s. 0d.
  • Patrick Joyce had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £2. 5s. 0d. The buildings had a value of £0. 10s. 0d.
  • James M’Gee (sic) had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £2. 5s. 0d. The buildings were valued at £0. 7s. 0d.

The Provost and Fellows of Trinity College Dublin were the immediate lessors of plot 2 that comprised 173 acres, 3 roods and 14 perches. This had an annual valuation of £18.15s.0d. Rev. Ralph Sadleir (sic) was the occupier of this land and had a herd’s house and office. The land was valued at £18.7s.0d., the house at £0.8s.0d.

Plot 3 consisted of 2 roods and 20 perches. Anastasia Dermody (sic) rented this plot from Rev. Ralph Sadleir (sic). The land was valued at £0. 3s. 0d.and the house was valued at £0.3s.0d.

Plot 4 contained 3 roods and 20 perches.

Henry Gibbons rented this parcel of land from Rev. Ralph Sadleir. The land was valued at £0.7s.0d., the house at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 5 comprised 28 acres, 3 roods and 20 perches and was held in two divisions.

  • Michael Coyne had a house office and land. He had 28 acres, 3 roods and 0 perches rented from Rev. Ralph Sadleir. The land was valued at £2.5s.0d., the buildings were valued at £1. 5s. 0d.
  • Myles Varley (sic) had a house, offices and garden. The garden was valued at £0. 3s. 0d. , the buildings had a value of £1. 5s. 0d.

Census 1901 for Carrick West:

The Census for Carrick West was enumerated by Constable William Ruane (sic) and was collected on between April 8th and April 11th 1901. (He was a twenty six year old single man attached to the Royal Irish Constabulary Hut in Cornamona (sic)). According to this census there were twenty four dwellings in Carrick West and all but one were occupied. Two of the premises were public houses as well as family homes. Of the twenty three inhabited dwellings; five were 2nd class, seventeen were 3rd class and one was 4th class. Only two of the dwellings had slate roofs, the remainder were of perishable materials, presumably thatch. All the occupants were born in County Galway and were Roman Catholic. Farming was the main occupation. Irish was the spoken language of the people, but many were fluent in both Irish and English. The second part of Form N – Enumerator’s Abstract for a Townland is missing and this would give the breakdown of population for the townland. Form B2 – The Return of Out – Offices and Farmsteadings is also incomplete therefore I can only show what the out offices were used for up to household number fifteen.

House 1: Patt Curran (60) a farmer was the head of the household.   His wife Mary was (59) and they had a son Edward who was (21) and a daughter Sarah who was (18). Edward’s occupation was listed as farmer’s son and Sarah’s as farmer’s daughter. Patt spoke Irish only and could not read, while his wife and family could read and write and were bilingual. They lived in a 3rd class house with two windows and the four family members occupied two rooms. They had two out offices, a stable and a cow house.

House 2: Thomas Coyne (44) was a farmer and a publican. His wife Catherine was (36) and they had a (3) year old son Patrick. His mother – in – law Catherine (80) a widow was also in the house. Thomas could read and write and his wife Catherine could read. The couple spoke both Irish and English. Catherine senior could not read and spoke only Irish. Their home was a 2nd class private dwelling and also a public house. Six rooms were occupied by four members of the family. The outbuildings consisted of a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 3: Catherine Watters (41) was a widow and a small shopkeeper. Her daughter Mary Anne was (18) years old and her occupation was not recorded. Mother and daughter were bilingual and both could read and write. They lived in a 2nd class dwelling with four windows to the front. There were no out houses on this property and the land holder was Thomas Coyne.

House 4: Honora Quigley (53) a National School Teacher was a widow. Her son Joseph Ambrose (18) was a monitor in national school while her other son James Edward (13) was a scholar. The family were bilingual and they could read and write. Their house was 2nd class with two windows to the front. They had no out offices and Thomas Coyne was the landholder of the property.

House 5: Thomas Leydon (sic) (59) was a farmer and shopkeeper. He was married to Mary (40) and they lived with their sons Michael (19) and Martin (17) who were listed as farmer’s sons. Their daughter Mary (16) was a farmer’s daughter and their other son John (15) was a scholar. Sarah Halloran (80) a widow and Thomas Leydon’s sister was with the family as was Kate Coyne (18) a general servant in the household. Kate could not read though she was bilingual. Thomas and his sister Sarah spoke Irish only and neither could read. His wife and children could read and write and were bilingual. The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front. The House and Buildings Return forms states two family members occupied three rooms, though the census records two parents and four children. The family had a cow house and a piggery.

House 6: James Buttler (sic) (40), a farmer and publican, his wife Bridget (34) and their eight children lived in house six. The older children were scholars; twin daughters Kate Anne and Mary Ellen were (12) years old, Walter was (10), Sarah (8) and John (6). The parents and school going children were bilingual and they could read and write. Their daughter Bridget was (3), Maggie was (2) and the infant Lizzie was (9) months old. Their home was 2nd class with three windows to the front and the family of ten shared six rooms. They had a cow house and a stable.

House 7: Thomas Treacy (sic) (42) a farmer was married to Kate (40). Mary (20) and Bridget (16) were listed as farmer’s daughters. Daniel (12), Lizzie (10), Patrick (8) and James (5) were scholars and the youngest child was (2) year old Walter. Thomas Treacy’s nephew John was 20 years old and a farm servant. The family were bilingual and they could read and write. They lived in a 2nd class house that had six windows to the front. Ten members of the family lived in six rooms. The farm buildings consisted of a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 8: James Hopkins (70) was married and farming was his occupation. He spoke Irish and English and he could read. His home was 3rd class with one window to the front. One person occupied two rooms. James had a cow house on the property.

House 9: Thomas McGovern (68) a widower, and his son Patrick (21) were farmers. His granddaughter Mary Flynn was (6) years old. They could not read. Thomas spoke only Irish while his son and granddaughter were bilingual. The house was 3rd class with one window to the front. Two rooms were occupied by three family members. They had a cow house on the plot.

House 10: Thomas Coyne (35) was a farmer and his wife Kate (28) a mother to baby Mary who was (4) months old. His mother Mary Coyne (68) a widow was with the family. None of them could read, the young couple were bilingual and Thomas’s mother spoke Irish only. Their house was 4th class and it had no window. The family occupied one room. They had a piggery.

House 11: James Gibbons (30) and his wife Mary (32) were farmers and their daughter Mary (10) was a scholar. The parents could read and write, while daughter Mary could read. The three of them were bilingual. Their other children were Bridget (6), Pat (3) and James (1) year old. They spoke only Irish. Mary McGee (60) was James’s mother. She was a widow who could not read and Irish was her spoken language. They lived in a 3rd class house that had two windows to the front. This family of seven shared two rooms. They had a cow house and a barn.

House 12: James Gibbons (80) a widower was head of this household. He could not read and he spoke only Irish. He and his son Patt (40) farmed for a living. Patt was married to Ellen who was (30) years old. Their children Michael (13), Mollie (11), Bridget (10) and Honor (sic) (8) were scholars. Infant James was (1) year old. Patt Gibbons (sic), his wife and children were bilingual, Patt and his children could read and write. Their house was 3rd class and had two windows to the front. The eight family members occupied three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 13: Andrew Hopkins (60), his wife Maria (61) and their son Thady (sic) (19) resided in house number13. Father and son were farmers and Irish was the language of the household. They could not read. The house was 3rd class with two rooms and had no windows to the front. Three people shared two rooms. They had a piggery on the holding.

House 14: Edward Hopkins (59) and his wife Bridget (59) lived with their son Patt (sic) (1 9) and their (14) year old daughter Honor (sic). Farming was their livelihood. Edward, Bridget and Patt could not read while Honor could read and write. The parents spoke only Irish but the children were bilingual. Their home was 3rd class with two rooms. It had one window to the front and four family members occupied two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery on their property.

House 15: Edward Mc Govern (54) was a farmer who was married to Kate (45) and they had four children. Michael (15) was documented as a farmer’s son, Catherine (13), a farmer’s daughter. Thomas (9) was a scholar as was his brother Edward who was (5). Edward and his wife Kate and their son Michael spoke only Irish while Catherine, Thomas and Edward were bilingual. The parents and older children could not read but the two youngest could read and write. Their house was 3rd class with two rooms and had one window to the front. Six family members shared two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery on the holding.

House 16: Martin Duffy (48), his wife Mary (40), their daughter Mary (20) and their sons Thomas (16) and John (14) lived in this house. Martin and his sons could read and write and were bilingual. His wife and daughter could not read and spoke Irish only. Martin’s widowed mother in law Julia (95) spoke only Irish and she was unable to read and write. The family lived in a 3rd class house that had two rooms and had two windows to the front. There were two outbuildings on the holding but the B2 form for the out buildings is not available so I cannot say what these buildings were used for.

House 17: Thomas Joyce (68) a widower was a tailor by trade. He spoke Irish and English but could not read. His house was 3rd class with one room and one window. He was the only person in the house and Martin Duffy was the name of the landholder.

House 18: was a private dwelling but was uninhabited. Edward McGovern was the name of the landholder.

House 19: Michael Curran (48) was a farmer.   He could not read and he spoke Irish only. He and his wife Mary (39) and their five sons and one daughter were the occupants of this house. Michael (19) and Edward (17) were listed as farmer’s sons; Patrick (16), James (14), Thomas (12) and Sarah (10) were scholars. The boys could read and write while Sarah could read only. The mother and children were bilingual. Their house was 3rd class with two rooms and had two windows to the front. Eight family members occupied two rooms. They had three out buildings on the property but the descriptions of these are missing.

House 20: Edward Curran (40) a farmer and his wife Bridget (30), their children Mary (9), Bridget (8), Michael (7), Julia (4) and the infant Patrick who was (1) month old were the family who resided in house 19. The parents and older children were bilingual. Bridget senior could read while her daughters Mary and Bridget could read and write. Their house was 3rd class with two rooms and two windows. The parents and children shared two rooms. There were two outbuildings on the holding.

House 21: Kate Walsh (69) a widow was head of this household. Her son Michael (42) was a farmer who was married to Margaret (31). Their children were Mary (9) and Kate (7) who were scholars, Michael (5), Patt (3) and the infant Bridget who was (4) months old. The grandmother spoke Irish only and like her son she could not read. Her daughter in law could read and write as could nine year old Mary. Young Kate could read only. Michael, his wife and children were bilingual. Their house was 3rd class and it had two rooms and two windows to the front. Eight family members occupied two rooms. There were three out offices with this property.

House 22: Anthony Walsh (65), his wife Mary (60) and their son Peter (26) were farmers. Anthony and his son were bilingual and Mary spoke only Irish. The parents could not read but Peter could read and write. Their home was 3rd class with two rooms. It had two windows to the front and the family of shared two rooms. They had two out offices.

House 23: John Magee (40) a farmer and his wife Mary (32) and their four children lived in house 23. John and Mary could not read and Irish was the language spoken in this home. Their daughters were Mary aged (4) and Bridget (3). Their son John was (2) and baby James was (2) months old. Their house was 3rd class and had two rooms, and two windows. The family of six occupied two rooms. There were four out buildings on the holding.

House 24: Margaret Walsh (75) a widowed farmer was the head of the house. Her son Anthony (30) was listed as a farmer’s son. He was married to Barbara (28) and they had two sons. Patrick was (3) and James was (1) year old. Margaret spoke Irish and could not read. Anthony and his wife could read and they were bilingual. The house was 3rd class, with two rooms and two windows to the front. Five members of the family shared two rooms. There were four farm buildings on the property.

 1911 Census for Carrick West

Carrick West had a population of one hundred and twenty two people. Of this number sixty seven were male, and fifty five were female. All were Roman Catholic and the majority were farmers. Most of the houses had perishable roofs (thatch) and were second or third class though one was a fourth class house. Two of the homes had no windows. Two people were born in Co. Mayo; one young boy was born in the United States of America, while the rest of the people were born in Co. Galway. By 1911 the families were mainly bilingual

House 1: James Gibbons (42) and his wife Mary (45) lived in house number one. James was a farmer and was married to Mary for fifteen years and it stated they had six children. However eight children were recorded on the form. Harry the eldest son was (20) years and his sister Bridget was (16) years old. No occupation was given for them. Patrick (14) was a scholar as was James (12), John (10) and Mary Anne (9). Michael was (5) and the youngest was Margaret who was (2) years old. The father and children could read and write while the mother could not read. The family were bilingual. They lived in a 2nd class house that had three rooms, and had three windows to the front. The family of ten occupied three rooms. The three out offices consisted of a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 2: Catherine Waters (56) a widow, was a General Grocer. Her daughter Mary Ann Curran (25) was in the house with her son John. He was (2) years old and was born in the United States of America. Catherine and her daughter could read and write and were bilingual. They lived in a 2nd class house that was also a shop. The house had four rooms with four windows to the front. The family shared four rooms and they also had a fowl house.

House 3: John Gibbons (46) was born in County Mayo, he was married to Bridget (61) for twenty four years and they had no children. John could read and write while Bridget could not read. They spoke Irish and English. Their home was also a shop that had four rooms, and had eight windows to the front. The husband and wife occupied four rooms. The two out offices were used as a cow house and a piggery.

House 4: Edward McGovern (71) and his wife Kate (60) were in house number four. They were married for forty years and had ten children, seven lived. Edward was a farmer. His sons Michael (21) and Thomas (18) had no occupation listed for them. Michael and his parents could not read and spoke only Irish. Thomas and his other brother Edward (12) who was a scholar could read and write and were bilingual. Theirs was a 2nd class house with three rooms and three windows to the front. The family of five shared three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 5: Andrew Hopkins (72) was a farmer. His wife Kate was (75) and they had been married for forty eight years and had four children. Andrew (30) was single and was in the home with them. Andrew and his son were bilingual while Maria spoke Irish only. None of the family could read. They lived in a 2nd class house that had three rooms that the three members occupied. The house had three windows to the front. There were three out buildings on the plot; a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 6: James Butler (47) was a farmer and a publican. He was married to Bridget (42), born in County Mayo, for twenty three years. They had twelve children. Mary Ellen (21) was the eldest and was single. James (20) was assisting on the farm. Sarah was (16) and as with Mary Ellen, it does not list an occupation. John (14), Teresa (12), Lyzie (sic) (9), Elsie (8), James (6) and Christina (4) were all scholars. The family were bilingual and they could read and write, even four year old Christina could read. James Butler completed and signed his own census form. The family lived in a 2nd class dwelling that was also a public house. Twelve family members occupied eight rooms and the building had five windows to the front. The four out buildings were used as a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 7: Thomas Coyne (58) was married to Kate (52) for fourteen years and they had one child. Their son Patrick was (12) years old and he was a scholar. Thomas was a publican and a farmer. Mary Glynn (71) was a boarder and she was listed as a servant. Thomas, his son and Mary Glynn could read and write while Kate could not read. All of the household were bilingual. The house was 2nd class, with three windows in front. The home was also a public house. It had seven rooms that were occupied by three of the family. The four out offices consisted of a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 8: Mary Walsh (80) was head of the household. She was a widow and lived with her son Peter (35) who was single. They were farmers and their house was 2nd class with three windows in front. Mary spoke Irish only and could not read, while Peter could read and was bilingual. There were three out offices on the property; a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House 9: John McGee (60) was a farmer who was married to Mary (40) for sixteen years. Six children were born to them and five survived. Their son Patrick was (15) and like his parents, spoke only Irish and could not read. John (12), James (10) and Kate (9) were scholars. James and John could read and write and were bilingual. Kate could not read and spoke Irish. Their house was 3rd class and had two windows to the front. The family of six occupied three rooms. They had two outbuildings on the plot; a cow house and a piggery.

House 10: Margaret Walsh (74) a widow was the head of this household. She spoke Irish only and could not read. Her son Anthony (32) and his wife Barbara (31) lived with her. The couple were married for thirteen years and had seven children and farming was their occupation. They were bilingual and could read and write. Their children Patrick (12), James (10), Mary (9) and Martin (8) were scholars and except for eight year old Martin, could read and write. Margaret was (5) Anne (3) and the infant Anthony was (6) months old. The young children spoke Irish only as this was the language of the home. Their house was 2nd class with 3 windows to the front. Ten members of the family occupied three rooms. The outbuildings were used as a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 11: Patrick Curran (70) was a farmer and his son Edward (32) who was single was in the house with him. Patrick spoke Irish only and could not read while Edward could read and write and was bilingual. The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front. Father and son shared three rooms. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery on their holding.

House 12: Mary Coyne (80) was a widowed farmer. Though she could not read, she was bilingual. Her son Thomas (40) and his wife Kate (34) lived in house number 12 with her. They were married for eleven years and six of the seven children born to them survived. Mary was (8), Michael (6), Anthony (4), Edward (3), Thomas (2) and baby John was (6) months old. Thomas worked as a head miner. The family could not read but he and his wife and children down to the four year old were bilingual. Their house was 3rd class and had two windows to the front and the family of nine occupied two rooms. A cow house and a piggery were on this plot of land.

House 13: Thomas McGovern (80) was a widower. His son Patrick (30) and his wife Mary (32) lived with him. They were married for ten years and had five children, but only three lived. Bridget was (8), Ellen (5) and Kate was (3) years old. Farming was their occupation. Their house was 3rd class and had two windows. The family of six shared two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery on the holding.

House 14: Edward Curran (58) and his wife Bridget (40) were married for twenty years. Eight of the nine children born to them survived. Mary was (19), Michael (15), Julia (12), Patrick (10), Sarah (7), Nora (4) and John was (1) year old. Edward was a farmer but what the children did was not recorded. The parents could not read, but Mary, Michael, Julia and Patrick could read so they had schooling. The family were bilingual except for the two youngest children. Their house was 3rd class and had two windows to the front. Two rooms were occupied by the family of nine. A cow house and a barn were also on the plot.

House 15: James Gibbons (90) was a widower. His son Patrick (55) and his wife Ellen (44) lived in house fifteen. They were married for twenty six years and of the nine children seven survived. Bridget was (19) and Patrick (17) and it does not say what their occupation was. James (11) and Anne (9) were scholars. Margaret was (2) years old. The children, with the exception of Margaret could read and write. The grandfather and parents could not read. The grandfather spoke Irish only but the rest of the family were bilingual. Their house was 2nd class with three windows in front. Eight family members occupied three rooms. The out buildings consisted of a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 16: Kate Walsh (83) a widow was the head of the household. Living with her in house number sixteen was her son Michael (55) and his wife Margaret (44). They had been married for twenty one years and had eight children. Seven of them were living. Kate, her son and daughter – in – law could not read. Kate (17) the granddaughter and grandson Michael (15) could read and write. Patrick (13) and Bridget (11) were scholars and they could read and write. James (8) was a scholar also but could not read. Ellen was (3) years old and like her grandmother spoke Irish only, the rest of the family were bilingual. Their house was 2nd class with three windows to the front. The family of ten shared three rooms. On the property was a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 17: Mary Herwood (sic) (80) was a widow and an old age pensioner. Bridget Doherty (70) had no occupation and was a boarder in Mary’s house. The dwelling was 3rd class with two windows in front. The two ladies shared two rooms. There was a piggery on the plot.

House 18: Martin Duffy (69) a farmer was married to Mary (70) for forty one years. Although eight children were born to the couple only four lived. Martin and Mary spoke Irish. Their sons were Thomas (26) and John (24) and they were bilingual. None of the family could read. Their house was 2nd class with three windows in front. The four family members occupied three rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 19: Michael Curran (64) and his wife Mary (63) were married for thirty seven years and had nine children, eight lived. No occupation was given for this family. James was (21), Thomas (19) and Sarah (18) years old. The children could read and write while the parents could not read. The father spoke only Irish and the mother and children were bilingual. The house was 2nd class and had three windows to the front. The family of five shared three rooms.   They had a cow house and a barn with this property.

House 20: Thomas Lydon (72) was a farmer and a grocer and Irish was his language. He was married to Mary (60) for thirty seven years and of the nine children born to this couple, only six survived. Mary was bilingual, though as with her husband, she could not read. Their sons were Michael (28) and Martin (26) and their daughter Mary was (22). All were single and they could speak both Irish and English. Their home was 2nd class with four windows in front and it was also a shop. There were four out buildings on site; a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 21: Thomas Treacy was a (64) year old farmer who was married to Mary (50) for seven years. Mary was born in Co. Mayo and they had two children from the marriage. Their daughter Margaret was (5) years and son Thomas (8) months. Thomas Treacy had a son Walter who was (11) years old. The father, mother and Walter could read and write and the family were bilingual. Their house was 2nd class with five windows to the front. They had six out buildings that were used as a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.

House 22: Thomas Joyce (73) was a widower and was a tailor by profession. He could not read but was bilingual. His house was listed as 4th class and had one window in front. Thomas occupied one room. There was no other building on the property.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This page was added on 15/11/2017.

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