Treananearla – Trian an Iarla – The Third of the Earl

Despite research in the Ordnance Survey Name Books, any reference to the origin of Treananearla could not be located.  The Irish form of the name, Trian an Iarla, meant The Third of the Earl.  The Placenames Commission officially name the townland today exactly the same as the Ordnance Survey Name Books.

Down through the centuries religion played a major part in the lives of the people throughout the country.  It was practised with zeal and devotion despite many obstacles.  These criteria applied to Killimor Parish, when in the 17th century, during the Penal Laws, Catholics of the parish of Killimor-Bologue attended Mass on or near a hill, known as Mass Hill, or Cnoc an Aifrinn, (in Treananearla), which was situated on the road leading towards Gorthanumera.

Location

Treananearla is situated between Lismihill, Ballynaheskeragh, Heathlawn, Garryad and Garryduff, Ballycahill, Poulnahincha, Killeen East, and Moat.  The Ordnance Survey Map showed Mass Hill, a Holy Well, Children’s Burial Ground and a Bullaun Stone in this townland.  The map also showed a school-house located near Lismihill Cross Roads.

Census 1841, 1851

According to census statistics in 1841, in terms of population, Trenanearla ranked second to Killimor town, with two hundred and seventy five people living in fifty two houses.

Post-famine statistics in 1851 showed a major decline in population and houses during that decade.   The number of people decreased by one hundred and fifty three, to one hundred and twenty two people occupying twenty one houses.

Griffith’s Valuation 1855

Griffith’s Valuation recorded the acreage as three hundred and ninety one acres, one rood and thirty seven perches of land, at a total annual valuation of £189.2s.0d.  The landowner was the Marquis of Clanricarde, who rented out all the land to various tenants.  Patrick Flood and others (not named) held thirteen acres, two roods and sixteen perches of bog. Tenants, who held land only, were Patrick Flood, John Barrett, Michael Dolan, John Fahy senior, Patk. Dohohoe junior and Michael Donohoe, who between them, held ten acres, three roods and thirty eight perches.   Patrick Donohoe junior also had a separate holding of eleven acres, and three roods.  Tenants, holding a house and land each, were Anne Fahy (Martin Head held part of this land), on five acres and thirty perches, Patrick Muldoon, John Hough, Thomas Horan and Patrick Gallagher.  Names which appeared holding a house, offices and land included Anne White, Martin Head, Patrick Fahy, Patrick Mitchell, Matthew Brennan, Joseph Donohoe, Thomas Calligy, John Fahy junior, Michael Donohoe, Martin Carey and Patrick Donohoe senior.  The acreage of these holdings ranged in size from thirty seven acres and thirty six perches, to eighteen acres and twenty two perches of land, the smallest holding being one acre and three roods.

Census 1861, 1871, 1881 and 1891

Census statistics listed seventy eight people in sixteen houses in 1861, and seventy four in thirteen houses in 1871.  A slight increase in population was noted in 1881 with eighty four people occupying twelve houses.   The 1891 records still show twelve houses but a notable decline in population to thirty four people was registered.

1901 Census

The 1901 census listed five houses in the townland, one of which was uninhabited and the landholder was named as Edward Horsman.

John Donohoe

John Donohoe lived in house 1 in Treananearla in 1901.  He was a farmer, and landholder, aged 45 and was head of family.  His wife, Delia, was 30 years old and both could read and write.  John could speak Irish and English.  John’s brother, Thomas, was aged 42 and was described as farmer’s brother and was not married and he could read and write.  James Fahey was 65 years old, a farm servant who could also read and write.  All 4 were Roman Catholics and were born in Co. Galway.

Form B 1 – House and Building Return – showed they had a 2nd class private dwelling with 7 out-offices.  The house was of stone/brick or concrete with a thatched or wood roof.  It had 3 windows in front and the family occupied 4 rooms.

Form B 2 – Return of Out-Offices and Farm- Steadings listed their out-offices as: 2 stables, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 barn and 1 shed.

John Donohoe signed the census form which was collected on the 9th April and Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

John Clasby 

John Clasby, in house 2, was a farmer and head of family. He was aged 40.  He was married to Bridget who was 35 years old and both could read and write.  They had 2 daughters; Mary aged 3 and Anne aged 1.  Michael Houlihan, a farm servant, aged 17, was not married and he could read and write.  Mary Donohoe, aged 13, was described as a general servant who could also read and write.  She was not married.  All in the household were Roman Catholics and were born in Co. Galway.

Form B 1 showed John Clasby was the landholder on whose holding their 2ndclass private dwelling was built.  The house had walls of stone/brick or concrete with a thatched or wood roof.  They occupied 3 rooms and the house had 3 windows to the front.

Seven out-offices were listed for house 2.  They were: 1 stable, 2 cow houses, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 shed.

The census form was signed by John Clasby and it was collected on April 18th1901.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

Patt Donohoe

Patt Donohoe was head of family in house 3.  He was 44 years old and a shepherd.  He was married to Catherine, aged 40, and both could read and write.  Their sons; William aged 12, Thomas aged 10, their daughter; Margaret, aged 8, and another son, Pat, aged 6, were  scholars and all, except Pat, could read and write.  They were Roman Catholics and were born in Co. Galway.

Form B 1 showed they occupied a private 2nd class dwelling and Edward Horseman was the landholder.  The house had walls of stone/brick or concrete with slate/iron or tiled roof with 2 windows in front.  They occupied 4 rooms.

Form B 2 listed their 3 out-offices as a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house.

The census form was signed by Patt Donohoe.  It was collected on 9th April and the Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

House No. 4   

House No. 4 was uninhabited and no other details were given.

Richard Horseman

House 5 was occupied by the Horsman family.  Richard Horsman was a 50 year old farmer.  His wife, Mary, was 35 years old.  He could not read but Mary could read and write.

They were both born in Co. Galway.  He was Church of Ireland and she was Roman Catholic.

Their private dwelling was 2nd class and Richard was the landholder.  The house walls were of stone/brick or concrete with a slate/iron or tiled roof.  There were 2 windows to the front and they occupied 4 rooms.

Form B 2 showed they had 2 out-offices, a stable and a cow house.

The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable, and he was witness to Richard’s mark x on the census form which was collected on 9th April.

1911 Census

Treananearla retained five houses according to the 1911 census, one still unoccupied.

John Clasby

House 1 was occupied by the Clasby family and John was the landholder and head of family.  He was 50 and married for 15 years to Bridget aged 46.  They had 6 children with 4 still living.  Their 4 children, described as scholars were: Mary Ellen, aged 13, Annie, aged 11, James, aged 7, and Katie, aged 5.  All the family could read and write except Katie who could read only.  They were Roman Catholics and were born in Co. Galway.  John, Mary Ellen and Annie could speak English and Irish.

Form B 1 showed their private dwelling was 2nd class with 7 out-offices.  The walls were stone/brick or concrete with thatch or wood roof.  It had 3 rooms with 3 windows in front.

Form B 2 listed their out-offices as: 1 stable, 1 coach house, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

John Clasby signed the census form and John Mullooly, Constable, was the Enumerator and it was collected on 18th April.

John Donohoe

House 2 in Treananearla was occupied by both Donohoe and Gorman families in 1911.  John Donohoe was head of family and landholder.  He was a 58 year old farmer who could read and write.  He was married to Delia, aged 39, for 11 years.  She could also read and write.  Their niece, Annie Gorman, was an 11 year old scholar who could read and write.  Another niece, Ellen Gorman, was aged 2 years.   All could speak English except Ellen.  They were Roman Catholics and were born in Co. Galway.

Their private dwelling was a 1st class house and they occupied 6 rooms.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was slate/iron or tiles.  It had 8 windows in front.

Form B 2 listed their 8 out-offices as: 1 stable, 1 coach house, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 shed.

John Donohoe signed the census form and the Enumerator was John  Mullooly, Constable. The form was collected on 18th April.

Daniel Craughwell

The Craughwell family resided in house 3 in 1911.  Daniel was head of family.  He was a 55 year old shepherd.  He was married to Anne, aged 51, for 31 years.  They had 5 children still living.  Their daughter, Cecelia, aged 20, was the only one living with them on the night of the census.  She was single and they all could read and write.  They were Roman Catholics and were born in Co. Galway.

Form B 1 showed that Edward Horsman was the land holder on whose land their 2nd class private dwelling was built.   The house walls were of stone/brick or concrete with slate/iron or tiled roof.  They occupied 4 rooms.

They had 3 out-offices consisting of a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

Daniel Craughwell signed the census form which was collected on April 18thand the Enumerator was John Mullooly, Constable.

Martin Donohoe  

Martin Donohoe, a landholder, was a 37 year old blacksmith.  He was single and could read and write.  He was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic.

His private dwelling was 2nd class and he had 2 out-offices.  The walls of the dwelling were of stone/brick or concrete with a slate or tiled roof.  It had 2 windows to the front and he occupied 4 rooms.

The out-offices were 1 piggery and 1 forge as listed on Form B 2 – Return of Out-Offices and Farm-Steadings.

Martin Donohoe signed the census form which was collected on 18th April and the Enumerator was John Mullooly, Constable.

 

This page was added on 17/02/2017.

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