Killimor and Boleybeg – Cill Iomair – Imor’s Church

Several variations of the name are given in the Ordnance Survey Name Books. The first mention of the townland was during the reign of Elizabeth I (1558-1603), when it was referred to as Killeymore.  Two spellings of the name were recorded in the reign of James I (1603-1625): Killamore and Killymur.  In the time of William III (1689-1702), the version used was Kellymore.  The Ordnance Survey Name Books spelled the name as Killimore.  Rev. Francis Coghlan (Roman Catholic Parish Priest) referred to this townland as Killimor and Boulabeg, while George D.H. Kirkaldy (Landowner. Hearnsbrook Demesne) wrote Killimor and Buolabeg.  However, the standard name was given as Killimor and Boleybeg. The Irish version given was Cill Iomair, meaning Imor’s Church  The name Boleybeg was not explained in the Ordnance Survey Name Books, however, in the booklet Irish Place Names the meaning is given as follows: Boley, a milking or dairy place; Boleybeg: little boley or dairy place. Killimor is also recorded as Killimore and Killimorbologue. Some experts think that the word bologue means a loaf or a yearling heifer.  Another possible meaning for Killimorbologue/Cill Iomair Bolga is Killimor of the Builg, the old name of the area being Tuath Bolga, indicating that the Fir Bolg(a Celtic Tribe who landed near Clarinbridge in the years BC) resided here. The current official name of Killimor in Irish is Cill Íomair according to the Placenames Commission.

Location

This townland is positioned between Moneenavinna, Rusheeny, Magheramore, Garryad and Garryduff, Garrynasallagh, Ballycahill, Caher and Hearnesbrook Demesne.  The area was described in the OS Name Books as a townland which contained part of the town of Killimor, a few detached houses, a fair green and pound, a church ruin and grave-yard, a holy well and site of a cross, some detached portions of fir planting and some arable land.

Census 1841, 1851

Census statistics for 1841 recorded forty six people living in Boleybeg in eleven houses, with a severe post-famine decline by 1851, to five people and one house.

Census statistics recorded four hundred and thirty one people living in ninety two houses in Killimor town in 1841.  Unlike most other townlands in the parish, there was a major post-famine increase in population by 1851, to six hundred and forty five people living in eighty eight houses.

Griffith’s Valuation 1855

That part of the town of Killimor (Main-Street) which was situated in Garryad and Garryduff covered thirteen acres, one rood and ten perches, when the acreage of the various plots, as given in Griffith’s Valuation, was totalled.   There were several holdings, in the town, many of which belonged to the main landowner, Lord Dunsandle.  He leased out a house each to John Clarke and Laurence Mohon.  One tenant, Michael O’Hara held a house and office, at a total annual valuation of £1.0s.0d.  Lord Dunsandle rented out a house and yard, to both John Briscoe and John Carroll; a house, forge and garden to Patrick Costello; a house and garden to John Meade; a house, office and garden to Joseph Laird; office and garden to Thomas Hobbs; office and garden to Michael Pelly; house, offices, yard and garden each to Thomas Hobbs, Stephen Stuart, John Fahy, Mary McHugh, Thomas Carey, Michael Hogan, and Michael Carroll.  The latter named, also held one acre, one rood and twenty seven perches of land.  Tenants who rented a house, yard and garden from Lord Dunsandle were: Michael Burke, William Smith, Michael Sughley, John Sughley and Thomas Carey.  Martin Broderick held a house, offices, yard and three roods and twenty five perches of land, at a total annual valuation of £3.0s.0d.  A house, yard and land, were held each by Michael Monaghan and John Egan, senior.   Michael Costello held a house, offices and two acres, three roods and twelve perches of land.  Michael Pelly and Thomas Hobbs each held an office (shed) and garden while John Enwood held six perches of garden.

Griffith’s Valuation also listed other owners of houses and small amounts of land in the town of Killimor.  Michael Burke owned three houses, one of which was vacant, and the others were rented out to Mary Moran and Thomas Kelly.  Edward Costello rented a house and garden to Martin Callan and Jude Finegan, on twenty six perches of land, at a total annual valuation of £1.10s.0d.  James Ward rented a house, offices, yard and garden, covering one rood and seven perches, from John Fallon.  John Coghlan rented a house, offices, yard and garden from William Ivers, on ten perches of land, at a total annual valuation of £7.0s. 0d. Thomas Hobbs rented a house, yard and garden to John Hanbury; a house to Thomas Connery; a house and garden to Michael Regan and was also the owner of a vacant house.  Stephen Stuart rented out a house and yard both to John Keane and Michael Conway.  Michael Pelly rented a house from the Marquis of Clanricarde, at a total annual valuation of £4.0s. 0d.   Michael Pelly, in turn, rented out a house, offices and yard and separate offices to Andrew O’Lyons.  Mary McHugh owned three houses, one of which she rented to Bernard Quinn while the other two were vacant.  Patrick McGuinness leased out a house, yard and garden, to Mary Kane on twenty two perches of land.  On the south side of the town, John Enwood rented out a house and garden to James White on six perches of land, at a total annual valuation of £1.5s.0d.  Michael Carroll had four houses and rented them out to Thomas Burke, Bridget Whelan, William Duffy and John Larkin.  Michael Gilligan rented a house from Thomas Carey and William Carey rented a house from John Egan, senior.

Waste under houses, yards and street was recorded as covering one acre, two roods and fourteen perches of land.  The acreage of the town, under the heading ‘Exemptions’, was one acre and five perches.  Lord Dunsandle was named as the Immediate Lessor of three roods and thirty one perches of land, on which stood the R.C. Chapel.  William Ivers owned fourteen perches, which he rented out to the Constabulary Force, and on which were the Police-Barrack, yard and garden.  Guardians of the Poor of Portumna Union rented the Dispensary from Michael Kelly.  The Petty Sessions-House was rented by the Grand Jury of Co. Galway, from Mary McHugh.

The part of the town of Killimor (Main Street) that  situated in Garrynasillagh, covered six acres and two perches, according to calculations from Griffith’s Valuation.  The Marquis of Clanricarde rented out a house and garden each to the following: Ellen Raftery, John McGovern, Michael O’Hara, John Killian Peter Horan and lastly, to John McGovern and John Thompson who shared the one house.  Tenants who held a house, offices (sheds) yard and garden from the Marquis of Clanricarde were: Patrick Shanny, Patrick Flood, William Delahunt, John Bernard and Ferdinand Campbell. Michael Dillon (lodgers) held a house, office and garden. A tenant named John Barrett, held a house, yard and garden, on thirty six perches of land, while Rev. Francis Coghlan held two gardens measuring twenty seven perches, and twenty three perches, at a total annual valuation of £0.10s.0d.  Michael O’Hara owned a house, which he rented out to Catherine Enwood; both Ellen Raftery and Joseph Laird were the owners of vacant houses.  John Bernard rented out a house, offices, yard and garden, on sixteen perches of land, to James Coghlan, the total annual valuation of which property was £7.0s.0d.

Waste under houses, yards and street covered two acres, two roods and eleven perches of land.  Under the heading ‘Exemptions’, Griffith’s Valuation gave the following information: a house, offices, yard and small garden were owned by Martin Muldoon and leased out to the Board of Public Works.  Patrick Shanny was given as the owner of an office (shed), which was also leased out to the Board of Public Works.

Census 1861, 1871, 1881, 1891

Census statistics yielded the following information: In Boleybeg there were twenty seven people living in five houses in 1861, while fourteen people lived in four houses in 1871.  By 1881 there were thirteen people in four houses and there were eleven people living in four houses in 1891.

In Killimor town, by 1861 there was a decline to three hundred and fifty eight people living in sixty five houses; two hundred and eighty six in sixty six houses in 1871 and three hundred and eleven people in sixty seven houses by 1881, and two hundred and sixty nine people residing in sixty one houses in 1891.  In a forty year period, from 1851 to 1891 there was a major population drop by three hundred and seventy six people.

1901 Census

Killimor and Boleybeg/Killimor Town

 Catherine Connor

Catherine Connor, who was a widow, and her son, James, were residents of house 1 in Killimor in 1901.  Catherine, a farmer, was aged 55 and James was 17 years, and his occupation was given as farmer’s son.  James was born in England and Catherine’s birthplace was Co. Galway.  Both were Roman Catholics.  Catherine and James could read and write and Catherine spoke Irish and English.

Catherine had a shop and private dwelling.  Her 1st class house had stone, brick or concrete walls, a roof of slate, iron or tiles, 8 front windows and 7 rooms.

Three out-offices were recorded on Form B 2: 2 cow houses and 1 calf house.

The census form, signed by Catherine Connor, was collected on 1st April.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

John E. Harte

John E. Harte was a Constable R.I.C.  He was 28 and his wife, Julia E, was 23.  They had 2 children, 1 year old Charles F. and Iris M. who was 3 months old.  John E., Julia and Iris were born in Co. Galway and Charles was born in Co. Mayo.  The Harte family were Roman Catholic and the parents could read and write.

Harte’s private dwelling was recorded as a 2nd class house.  Four rooms were occupied by the family, the walls were stone, brick or concrete, the roof was slate, iron or tiles, and the house had 2 windows in front.

There was no record of any out-offices on Form B 2.

Form A was signed by John E. Harte and was collected on 1st April.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Martin Hara

Martin Hara, a carpenter, was aged 35 and his wife, Kate, was 27.  Their children were: John who was 11, Mary aged 9, and Rose 7, the third girl Margaret was 4 and Kate was 2 years.  All family members were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.  Martin, Kate, John and Mary could read and write, and Rose was able to read.  The 3 older children were listed as scholars.

Martin Hara’s private dwelling was a 2nd class house.  Four rooms were occupied by the family, there were 5 front windows, the walls were stone, brick or concrete and the roof was slate, iron or tiles.

There was 1 out-office, a cow house, on the holding.

Martin Hara signed the census form which was collected on 1st April.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

Pat Larkin 

Pat Larkin, his wife, Celia, their daughter, Bridget, and 2 general servants, Bridget Hays (sic) and Mary Conway, were listed as residents of house 4.  Pat was aged 70, Celia was 60 and Bridget was 27 years.  Bridget Hays was 24 and Mary Conway was 23.  Pat’s occupation was given as shopkeeper and farmer and that of his daughter as shop assistant.  All occupants were Roman Catholic; born in Co. Galway and could read and write.  The 3 younger females were single.

Pat Larkin had a shop and a private dwelling which was a 1st class house.  The walls were stone, brick or concrete, the roof was tile, slate or iron, the house had 9 windows in front and 9 rooms were occupied.

Thirteen out-offices stood on the holding including 3 stables, 2 cow houses, 3 calf houses, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn, 1 store and 1 forge.

The census form, signed by Pat Larkin, was collected on 1st April.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

John O’Meara

John O’Meara, aged 41, was a farmer and shopkeeper.  His wife, Julia, was 28 and their son, Vincent, was 8 years old.  Also in the house were 16 year old Margaret Lyons, a shop assistant, and Christiane Grace, 18, who was a general servant.  All the residents were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway, (except Christiane who was born in Co. Dublin) and could read and write.  In addition, John spoke Irish and English.

John O’Meara’s private dwelling was recorded as a 2nd class house.  Six rooms were occupied, there were 5 front windows, a roof of slate, iron or tiles, and stone, brick or concrete walls.

No out-offices were recorded on Form B 1.

John O’Meara signed the census form which was collected on 1st April.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

Thomas Hoolihan

Thomas Hoolihan (sic) was 19 years of age, single and a general labourer.  He was Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway, could read and write, and was a resident of house 6.  However, on Form B 1- House and Building Return – no distinct family is listed as occupying house 6.  The building, on John O’Meara’s  holding, was described as a shop, with stone, brick or concrete walls, a thatch or wood roof, 3 windows in front, 4 rooms, and 1 person in the family.

Nine out-offices were recorded on the holding, 2 stables, 1 harness room, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 2 piggeries, 1 fowl house and 1 store.

The census form, signed by Thomas Houlihan, was collected on 1st April.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

James Byrnes

James Byrnes, aged 73, was a butcher and farmer.  His wife, Bridget M. was 56 and their son, Patrick, was 30.  Also in the house was a 12 year old general servant named Martin Muldoon. James and Bridget M. were born, in Co. Tipperary while Patrick’s and Martin’s birthplace was Co. Galway.  The 4 occupants were Roman Catholic and could read and write.

James Byrnes’s house was 2nd class, with stone, brick or concrete walls, a thatch or wood roof, 3 front windows and 2 rooms occupied by the family.  There was no record of any out-offices on the holding.

The census form was signed by James Byrne’s and was collected on 1st April.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

Killimor Dispensary      

Killimor Dispensary was recorded as No. 8 on Form B 1 – House and Building Return, in the census of Ireland 1901.

Timothy Dooley

Timothy Dooley was a widower, aged 60.  His occupation was given as general labourer.  His children were: Joseph, 21, a general labour, Catherine who was 13, next was Margaret, 12, Mary was 11 and the younger boy, Timothy, was 6 years.  Catherine, Margaret, Mary and Timothy were scholars.  All the Dooley family were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.  The only family member unable to read and write was 6 year old Timothy.

Timothy Dooley’s house was listed as 3rd class, it had 2 rooms, 2 front windows, a thatch or wood roof, and stone, brick or concrete walls.

There was no record of any out-offices on the holding according to Form B 2 Return of Out-Offices and Farm-Steadings.

Timothy Dooley, as head of family, signed the census form, which was collected on 1st April.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

Catherine Delahunt    

Catherine Delahunt, according to Form A, Census of Ireland, 1901, was a 59 year old widow whose occupation was given as shop keeper.  Also in the house were her 2 daughters; Celia aged 27, and Lucy who was 24.  Both girls were single and worked as shop assistants.  Mother and daughters were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

Catherine had a shop and private dwelling.  The house was listed as 1st class with 9 rooms, 10 windows in front, a slate, iron or tile roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

There were 6 out-offices on the holding: a store, a fowl house, a piggery, a cow house and 2 stables.

Form A, signed by Catherine Delahunt, was collected on 1st April.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Margaret Donohoe

Margaret Donohoe, her sister Teresa, and her niece, Jessie Meara, were residents of house 11.  Margaret was 33, Teresa was 30 and Jessie was 11.  Both sisters were shopkeepers and unmarried, Jessie was a scholar.  All 3 were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

Form B 1 showed that Margaret had a shop and private dwelling.  Her house, listed as 2nd class, had a slate, tile or iron roof, stone, brick or concrete walls, 2 front windows, and 4 rooms occupied by the family.

There were 2 out-offices on the site – a stable and a cow house.

The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.  The census form, signed by Margaret Donohoe, as head of family, was collected on 1st April.

Stephen Stewart

Stephen Stewart was an 80 year old widower whose occupation was recorded as farmer.  His son, Henry, 46, and his daughter, Ellen, 30, were also in the house.  Both were unmarried; Henry was a farmer and Ellen was a shopkeeper.  The 3 Stewarts were born in Co. Galway, were Roman Catholic and could read and write.  In addition, Stephen spoke Irish and English.

Stephen’s private dwelling, a 2nd class house, had 5 rooms, 4 front windows, a slate, iron or tile roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

The 3 out-offices on the holding were a cow house, a calf house and a fowl house.

Stephen Stewart signed Form A which was collected on 1st April.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Shop and Private Dwelling

Number 13 on Form B 1 – House and Building Return – indicated an unoccupied shop and private dwelling but no other details were given.

John Hough

John Hough, aged 60, was a smith and farmer and was born in Co. Tipperary.  His 45 year old wife, Maria, was a shop assistant.  Their 3 sons and 3 daughters were also in the house.  Agnes, 25, and Annie, 22 were shop assistants.  The older son, Thomas, was 20, Delia was 18, John was 16 and the younger son Michael, was 10.  They were all listed as scholars.  John’s married brother-in-law, a 42 year old farmer named Michael Hobbs, was also a resident in house 4.  All the occupants (except John), were born in Co. Galway, and all 9 were Roman Catholic and could read and write.

John and family had a shop and private dwelling.  The 2nd class house had a slate, iron or tile roof, brick, stone or concrete walls, 5 front windows and 6 rooms occupied by the family.

Six out-offices were listed and they included a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a barn and a forge.

Form A, signed by John Hough, was collected on 1st April.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Thomas Head   

Thomas Head, 32, a carpenter, and his wife Bridget, aged 30, were residents of house 15 in Killimore/Killimor.  Both were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

Their private dwelling, a 2nd class house, had 5 rooms, 5 front windows, stone, brick or concrete walls and a slate, tile or iron roof.

There was 1 out-office recorded on Form B 2 – a piggery.

Thomas Head signed the census form which was collected on 1st April.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

Michael Duffy

Michael Duffy and his brother, Joseph, were residents of house 16.  Michael, aged 24 and single, was a shopkeeper.  Joseph was a 10 year old scholar.  Both could read and write, were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.

Michael had a shop and private dwelling.  The house, listed as 2nd class, had 3 rooms, 3 front windows, stone, brick or concrete walls and a tile, slate or iron roof.

One out-office was recorded on Form B 1.

The census form signed by Michael Duffy, was collected on April 1st.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Andrew Madden

Andrew Madden, head of family, was s stonemason, aged 31.  His wife, Maria, was 29.  Their older daughter, Jessie, was 4, Delia was 2 and their son, Patrick J. was 7 months.  There were 2 boarders in the house, 23 year old Kate Hobbs and 19 year old Norah Hobbs, both of whom were dressmakers and were single.  All occupants were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway.  The 4 adults were able to read and write.

Andrew had a shop and private dwelling and 2 out-offices.  The 2nd class house had walls of stone, brick or concrete, a roof of slate, tiles or iron, 5 windows in front and 5 rooms occupied by the residents.

The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.  Andrew Madden signed the census form which was collected on 1st April 1901.

Lizzie Molony     

Lizzie Molony was a 24 year old shopkeeper, who was listed as head of family.  Also in the house were her sister, Mary, aged 21, her brother, John, who was 19 and a younger brother, Jerome, aged 15.  Mary and John were shop assistants and Jerome was a scholar.  The 4 siblings were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

According to Form B 1, Lizzie Moloney (sic) had a shop and private dwelling and 5 out-offices.  Seven rooms of her 1st class house were occupied by the family.  The house had 7 windows in front, a slate, tile or iron roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

The Household Return was signed by Lizzie Molony and was collected on 1stApril.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Walton

Margaret L. Walton and her daughter, Violet A., were listed as residents of house 19.1 in Killimor/Killimore. Margaret was 28 and was born in Queens Co.  Violet was aged 6; her birthplace was given as Co. Tipperary, and she was a scholar.  Both persons could read and write and their religion was Church of Ireland.

Thomas Walton signed Form A on which was written “Note/Head of Family Enumerator on Form H”.  The signature of the Enumerator read Jno. E. Harte.

Form H – Return of Military, R. I. Constabulary or Metropolitan Police, in Barracks. – recordedChristian Name: J; Surname: W.;

Rank or Occupation: Sergeant

Religious Profession: Church of Ireland

Education: Read and Write; Age 37.

Occupation before Enlistment: Farmer’s son

Marriage: Married.

Where Born: Co. Carlow.

Christian Name: P; Surname: M

Rank or Occupation: Constable

Religious Profession: Roman Catholic

Education: Read and Write;   Age 41

Occupation before Enlistment: Farmer’s son

Marriage: Not married

Where Born: Co. Sligo.

Christian Name: J; Surname: P

Rank or Occupation: Constable

Religious Profession: Church of Ireland

Education: Read and Write;   Age 31

Occupation before Enlistment: Farmer’s son

Marriage: Not married.

Where Born: Co. Cork.

Christian Name: T; Surname: Mc

Rank or Occupation: Constable

Religious Profession: Roman Catholic

Education: Read and Write;   Age 25.

Occupation before Enlistment: Farmer’s son

Marriage: Not married

Where Born: Co. Galway

Language: Irish and English.

Christian Name: J; Surname: N

Rank or Occupation: Constable

Religious Profession: Church of Ireland.

Education: Read and Write;   Age 22

Occupation before Enlistment: Farmer’s son.

Marriage: Not married

Where Born: Co. Longford.

Form B 1 – House and Building Return – gave the No. of the Building as 19, and stated it was an R.I.C. Barrack. Thomas Walton, Sergeant, was named as Head of Family residing in the house.  The 2nd class house had 7 rooms, 5 front windows, a tile, slate or iron roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

There were 4 out-offices on the holding.

Form B 1 was signed by the Enumerator, Jno. E. Harte, Constable, Portumna Constabulary District.

William Walsh

William Walsh lived alone in house 20.  William was an unmarried 37 year old draper’s assistant who was born in Co. Galway.  He could read and write and his religion was recorded as Church of Ireland.

William’s private dwelling, a 3rd class house, had brick, stone or concrete walls, a thatch or wood roof, 2 windows in front and 3 rooms.

There was no record of any out-offices on the site.

The census form, signed by William Walsh, was collected on 1st April.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Thomas Costello

Thomas Costello, aged 80, was a shopkeeper and listed as head of family.  His wife, Maria, was 58.  Their son, Pat, was aged 23, unmarried and his occupation was general labourer.  The family members were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and were able to read and write.  Thomas spoke Irish and English.

He had a shop and private dwelling with 1 out-office on the site.

Costello’s 2nd class house had 4 rooms, 3 front windows, stone, brick or concrete walls and a slate, tile or iron roof.

The Household Return was signed by Thomas Costello and collected on 1stApril.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

Bridget McDermott

Bridget McDermott and her sister, Mary Conroy, were both widows.  Bridget was aged 60 and head of family; Mary was 45.  Also residing in the house were Bridget’s 3 nephews and 1 niece.  John Conroy was 17; Thomas Conroy was 14; the third boy, Christy Conroy was 12 and Anne Conroy was 7 years of age.  The 4 siblings were listed as scholars.  All the occupants were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.  Mary, John, Thomas and Christy could read and write; Bridget was able to read while Anne was unable to read and write.

Bridget’s private dwelling was a 3rd class house with 2 rooms occupied by the family, walls of stone, brick or concrete, a wood or thatch roof and 2 windows in front.

There were no-offices recorded on the holding.

Bridget McDermott’s mark x on the census form was witnessed by the Enumerator, Jno. E. Harte, Constable.  The form was collected on 1st April.

Pat Leo

Pat Leo was 42, a labourer, single and head of family.  His unmarried sister, Mary Ann, a shopkeeper, was aged 27.  Both were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

Pat’s private dwelling, a 3rd class house, had stone, brick or concrete walls, a thatch or wood roof, 2 front windows and 2 rooms.

No out-offices were listed on Form B 1.

Patt (sic) Leo signed Form A which was collected on 1st April 1901.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

Kate Keary 

Kate Keary was a widow aged 52, whose occupation was recorded as general servant.  Her 18 year old son, Joseph, was a general labourer.  Mother and son were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic.  Joseph could read and write while Kate was unable to do either.

Kate and Joseph occupied a 3rd class house.  The walls were of brick, stone or concrete, the roof was thatch or wood; there were 2 front windows and 2 rooms in the house.

No out-offices were recorded.

The Enumerator, Jno. E. Harte, Constable, witnessed Kate Keary’s mark x on Form A.  The form was collected on April 1st.

John Duddy  

John Duddy, his wife Marian, their 2 children, John’s brother Thomas, and a general servant named Lizzie Coughlin, were residents of house 25.  John was a 37 year old shopkeeper.  Marian was 35; the older child, Patrick Joseph was 4 and the daughter, Mary Agnes, was 2 years old.  Thomas a 20 year old shop assistant was single, Lizzie was 18 and not married.  John, Marian, Thomas and Lizzie could read and write; Patrick Joseph could read only.

John Duddy had a shop and private dwelling.  The 1st class house had 9 rooms occupied by the family, 9 windows in front, a slate, tile or iron roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

Eight out-offices were recorded on the holding.

The census form, signed by John Duddy, was collected on 1st April.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Thomas Duffy

Thomas Duffy, a farmer and shopkeeper, aged 42, was listed as head of family.  His 50 year old sister, Bridget, a shop assistant, lived with him.  There were 2 other people in the house: Thomas’s niece, Mary A. Keating, 26, who was a shop assistant and a general servant named James Madden, aged 53.  All 4 occupants were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

Thomas had a shop and private dwelling and 6 out-offices.  The house, recorded as 1st class, had stone, brick or concrete walls, a slate, iron or tile roof, 6 front windows and 8 rooms were occupied by the residents.

Thomas Duffy signed the census form which was collected on 1st April.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

Private Dwelling 

No. 27 on Form B 1 – House and Building Return – indicated an uninhabited private dwelling but no further details were given.

Mary Finn 

Mary Finn was a lodginghouse keeper, aged 67, who, with 3 lodgers, resided in house 28.  Mary was a widow and the last column in Form A indicated that she was deaf.  The lodgers were: Michael Martin, 75, a widower and general labourer; Betty Martin, 85, who was a widow, and another widower named Pat Connolly, who was a 60 year old farm labourer.  The 4 residents were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.  Mary and Michael could read and write while Betty and Pat were unable to do either.

Mary Finn’s private dwelling was a 3rd class house with 4 rooms, 2 front windows, a thatch or wood roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

There was 1 out-office on the holding.

The census form, signed by Mary Finn, was collected on 1st April 1901.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

Protestant Church

Form B 1 – House and Building Return – No. 29 indicated the Protestant Church.  No details were given but for further information see Chapter 17 of  “Killimor Our Parish and Our People”, under the heading Trinity Church, Killimor.

Roman Catholic Church 

No. 30 on Form B 1 – House and Building Return – indicated the Roman Catholic Church.  For further information see Chapter 17 of “Killimor Our Parish and Our People”.

John P. Callanan P.P.

John P. Callanan was a Roman Catholic Clergyman aged 33.  With him in the house were Andrew J. Flynn, 26, also a Roman Catholic Clergyman, and a general servant named Mary Duane, who was 35 years old, single and a Roman Catholic.  The 3 occupants were born in Co. Galway and could read and write.  In addition both clergymen spoke Irish and English.

John P. Callanan’s private dwelling (which was the house in which the priests of the parish resided) was a 2nd class house.  The walls were of stone, brick or concrete, the roof was slate, tiles or iron; there were 3 windows in front and 7 rooms.

Seven out-offices were listed on the holding and they included a stable, a coach house, a harness house, a cow house, a dairy, a fowl house and a turf house.

The Enumerator in 1901 was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.  The census form, signed by John P. Callanan, P.P., was collected on 1st April.

Martin Broderick

Martin Broderick and his aunt, Honor Broderick, were residents of house 32.  Martin was a single 55 year old farmer.  Honor, a widow, was 80 years.  Both were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.  Martin could read and write but Honor was unable to do either.

Martin’s house was recorded as 3rd class, with brick, stone or concrete walls, a wood or thatch roof, 2 rooms and 2 front windows.  Martin also had 3 out-offices: a cow house, a calf house and a piggery.

Martin Broderick, as head of family, signed the census form which was collected on 1st April.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Mary Hoolihan

Mary Hoolihan, a widow, was aged 65.  Her occupation was given as farmer.  Her son, Michael Hoolihan, was a 26 year old general labourer.  Also in the house was an itinerant musician named Michael Curley who was 48 years old.  The 3 residents were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.  Neither Mary nor Michael Curley could read or write while Michael Hoolihan was recorded as being able to do both.  Mary spoke Irish and English.

Hoolihan’s 3rd class house had 3 rooms, 2 front windows, a thatch or wood roof and brick, stone or concrete walls.

There were 2 out-offices on the site: a cow house and a piggery.

Jno. E. Harte, Constable, witnessed Mary Hoolihan’s mark x on Form A.  The form was collected on 1st April.

Eliza Madden

Eliza Madden, aged 65, was a widow who lived alone in house 34.  She was born in Co. Galway, was Roman Catholic and unable to read or write.

Eliza’s private dwelling, described as a 3rd class house, had a thatch or wood roof, stone, brick or concrete walls, 2 front windows and 3 rooms.

The only out-office on the holding was a piggery.

Eliza Madden’s mark x on the census form was witnessed by Jno. E. Harte, Constable.  The form was collected on 1st April.

Pat Broderick  

Pat Broderick, his wife Ellen and their 2 daughters, Mary Elizabeth and Emily, were residents of house 35 in 1901.  Pat, an army pensioner, was aged 60; Ellen, a dressmaker was 50; 17 year old Mary Elizabeth was also a dressmaker and the younger girl, Emily, a scholar, was aged 14.  All family members were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

Pat’s house, listed as 3rd class, had 3 rooms, 2 front windows, a thatch or wood roof, and stone, brick or concrete walls.

There were 2 out-offices with the private dwelling: a cow house and a piggery.

The census form was signed by Patt Broderick (sic) and was collected on 1stApril.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Private Dwelling

No. 36 on Form B 1 – House and Building Return – denoted an uninhabited private dwelling.

Private Dwelling     

No. 37 on Form B 1 – House and Building Return – denoted an uninhabited private dwelling.

Catherine Burke 

Catherine Burke, head of family, and her son, Joe Leord, occupied house 38.  Catherine was 69, single, and her occupation was given as wash woman.  Joe Leord, an unmarried man, aged 40, was a general labourer.  Catherine was unable to read whereas Joe could read and write.  Both persons were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.

Catherine’s private dwelling, listed as a 3rd class house, had a thatch or wood roof, stone, brick or concrete walls, 2 windows in front and 2 rooms.

There was no record of any out-offices on the holding.

Signature on Form A was that of Catherine Burke.  The form was collected on 1st April.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

Thomas Hoolihan

Thomas Hoolihan was a 40 year old general labourer.  His wife, Maria, was aged 30.  Their 4 children were: Ellen, 9, James 7, Lizzie, 4, and Francis who was 1 year old.  Both parents could read and write.  All family members were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic.

Hoolihan’s 3rd class house had 2 rooms, 2 front windows, stone, brick or concrete walls, and a thatch or wood roof.
No out-offices were recorded on Form B 1.

The census Form A was signed by Thomas Hoolihan and collected on 1st April.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

John Muldoon      

John Muldoon and his sister, Mary, were residents of house 40.  Thirty-two year old John was a bootmaker and Mary, aged 27, was a shop assistant.  John and Mary could read and write, were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.

John had a shop and private dwelling and 4 out-offices on his holding.  It is not clear from Form B 1 how many rooms were occupied in John’s 2nd class house.  The house had 6 front windows, a slate, iron or tile roof, and stone, brick or concrete walls.

Form B 2 listed the out-offices as a piggery and 3 stables.

Form A, signed by John Muldoon, as head of family, was collected on 1st April.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

Matthew Rudden 

Matthew Rudden, aged 55, was an RIC Pensioner.  His wife, Ellen, was 43 and his daughter, M. Clara, was 12 years old and listed as a scholar.  Margaret Lantry, a 50 year old general servant, was also in the house.  Margaret was unable to read and write but spoke Irish and English.  Matthew was born in Co. Cavan; Ellen, M. Clara and Margaret were born in Co. Galway.  All 4 residents were Roman Catholic.

Rudden’s private residence, a 1st class house, had 9 rooms, 6 windows in front, a slate, iron or tile roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

There were 5 out-offices on the holding and they included 2 stables, 1 barn, 1 turf house and 1 shed.

The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.  Mathew Rudden, as head of family, signed the census form which was collected on 1st April.

 Michael Carroll

Michael Carroll and his sister, Bridget, resided in house 42.  Michael, a farmer, was 60 and Bridget, a housekeeper, was aged 50.  Michael and Bridget who were both single, were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

Michael’s 2nd class house had walls of stone, brick or concrete, a thatch or wood roof, 3 windows in front and 4 rooms.

There was no record of any out-offices on the site.

Michael Carroll signed the census from which was collected on 1st April.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Mary Nevin

Mary Nevin, aged 50, was a lodging house keeper.  Three lodgers were in the house on the night of the census: Peter Connaire, a 30 year old tailor; James Harte, who was a shoemaker aged 40, and Martin Purcell, 63, who was a cattle drover.  The only resident not born in Co. Galway was James Harte, whose birthplace was given as Co. Sligo.  All 4 occupants were Roman Catholic and the only person unable to read or write was Martin Purcell.  Mary was a widow and the lodgers were all unmarried.

Mary Nevin’s private dwelling was a 3rd class house.  Three rooms were occupied, the walls were of stone, brick or concrete, the roof was thatch or wood and there were 2 windows in front.

No out-offices were recorded on Form B 1.

Form A was signed by Mary Nevin and collected on 1st April.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

John Hogan

John Hogan, his wife Mary, and their daughter and son were residents of house 44.  John, a farmer, was 36 and Mary was 37.  The older child, named Mary, a scholar, was 15.  The son, Thomas, 13, was also a scholar.  The 4 family members were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

John Hogan had a private dwelling and 3 out-offices.  His 3rd class house had 2 rooms, 2 front windows, a thatch or wood roof and brick, stone or concrete walls.

The out-offices were a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

John Hogan signed the census form which was collected on 1st April.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

Michael Larkin

Michael Larkin, aged 40 and single, was a general grocer who lived alone in house 45.  He could read and write, was Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway.

Michael had a shop and private dwelling and 2 out-offices on the holding.  His house, listed as 2nd class, had 3 rooms, 4 front windows, a slate, iron or tile roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

The out-offices named on Form B 2 were a turf house and a shed.

Form A, signed by Michael Larkin, was collected on 1st April.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

Bridge Hobbs 

Bridget Hobbs, 38, was a farmer and recorded as head of family.  Her sister, Maryanne Sullivan and her brother, Benjamin Sullivan, were in house 46 with her.  Maryanne was aged 30 and her occupation was given as farmer’s sister.  Benjamin’s occupation was farmer’s brother and he was 24 years.  Bridget was married; Maryanne and Benjamin were both single.  The 3 residents could read and write, were   born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic.

Bridget’s private dwelling was a 2nd class house with 3 rooms, 3 front windows, a slate, iron or tile roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

In addition to her house, Bridget had 8 out-offices.

Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator in 1901.  Bridget Hobbs signed the census form which was collected on 1st April.

Michael Mulligan

Michael Mulligan, his wife Catherine and their 3 daughters were residents of house 47 in Killimor (Killimore, Galway).  Michael, aged 40, was a Constable RIC and was born in Co. Meath.  Catherine, who was 40, was born in Co. Cork.  The children, all born in Co. Galway were: Kathleen, 9 years, Annie who was 7, and 5 year old Bridget; all 3 were scholars.  The only family member unable to read and write was Bridget.

The Mulligans occupied a 2nd class house which had 4 rooms, 4 front windows, a slate, iron or tile roof and brick, stone or concrete walls.

Form B 1 also indicated that there were 2 out-offices on the site.

Michael Mulligan, as head of family, signed Form A which was collected on 1stApril.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

Francis Soughley

Francis Soughley and his family occupied house 48.  Francis was a 40 year old farmer.  His wife, Margret (sic) was aged 32.  The older son, Michel was 10; John was 9; next was Mary who was 8; the second girl, Kathleen was 4; Margret Ellen was 2 and the younger child, Bridget Johanna, was 1 month old.  The parents and 3 older children could read and write; as yet Kathleen could only read.  All family members were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.

Francis Soughley had a private dwelling and 2 out-offices.  The 2nd class house had a slate, iron or tile roof, stone, brick or concrete walls, 4 windows in front 4 rooms occupied by the family.

Francis Soughley signed the census form which was collected on 1st April 1901.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

Annie Larkin

Annie Larkin was a single woman, aged 25, whose occupation was given as draper.  She was born in Co. Galway.  There were 3 female lodgers, all dressmakers, in the house with Annie:  Annie Gallagher who was 23 and born in Co. Roscommon; Annie Greogan, aged 18 who was born in King’s Co. and 16 year old Annie Broderick whose birthplace was recorded as Co. Galway.  The 4 residents were Roman Catholic and were able to read and write.

Annie Larkin had a shop and private dwelling.  Her house, described as 2ndclass, had 2 rooms occupied by the residents, 3 front windows, a thatch or wood roof and brick, stone or concrete walls.

Annie also had 3 out-offices.

The census form, signed by Annie Larkin, was collected on 1st April 1901.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Mary Haverty

Mary Haverty, according to Form A, was an 82 year old farmer and a widow in 1901.  Her son, James, was 36, a farmer’s son and not married.  Mother and son were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.  Both were able to read and write and, in addition, Mary spoke Irish and English.

On Form B 1 James Haverty was named as head of family residing in the house.  The 2nd class house had a thatch or wood roof, brick, stone or concrete walls, 2 front windows and 2 rooms occupied by the family.

There was no record of any out-offices on the site.

Jno. E. Harte, Constable, witnessed Mary Haverty’s mark x, as head of family, on Form A.  The form was collected on 1st April.

Eliza Kirwan

Eliza Kirwan, 57, was a shopkeeper.  She was a widow who was listed as head of family.  Her daughter, Mary, aged 25 and single, was a shop assistant.  Eliza’s son, named John, also single, was 23.  All 3 were Roman Catholics; born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

Eliza had a shop and private dwelling.  Her 1st class house had 10 rooms, 12 front windows, stone, brick or concrete walls and a slate, iron or tile roof.

Form B 1 recorded 8 out-offices on the holding.

Eliza Kirwan signed the census form which was collected on 12th April.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable, Portumna Constabulary District.

Bridget Meara 

Bridget Meara, a 56 year old single woman, was a shopkeeper.  She was Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.  According to the literacy column in Form A she could read only.

She had a shop and private dwelling but no out-offices were recorded.  Her 2ndclass house had stone, brick or concrete walls, a slate, iron or tile roof, 2 windows in front and 2 rooms.

Jno. E. Harte, Constable, witnessed Bridget Meara’s mark x on Form A.  The form was collected on 12th April.

Julia Griffin

Julia Griffin was alone in house 53 on the night of the census.  Julia, aged 55, was a married shopkeeper.  She was born in Co. Galway, was Roman Catholic and was able to read and write.

On Form B 1, Michl. Griffin was named as head of family, and was recorded as having a shop and private dwelling and 3 out-offices.

The house, listed as 2nd class, had 6 rooms, stone, brick or concrete walls, a slate, tile or iron roof and 6 windows in front.

Form A was signed by Julia Griffin, as head of family, and was collected on 12thApril.  The Enumerator was Jno, E. Harte, Constable.

Michael Foley

Michael Foley, his wife Jane and their 3 daughters and 2 sons were residents of house 54.  Michael was a 50 year old farmer, and Jane was aged 36.  The older daughter, Margaret, was 9; next was Janie, aged 6; John Joseph was 4; Thomas was 2 and the younger child, Hanoria was 1 month old.  All family members were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.  Michael and Janie could read, whereas Jane and Margaret were able to read and write.  The 3 older siblings were listed as scholars.  Michael Foley’s private dwelling, a 2nd class house, had stone, brick or concrete walls, a thatch or wood roof, 4 front windows, and 5 rooms occupied by the family.

There were 4 out-offices also on Michael’s holding.

Michael Foley, as head of family, signed the census form which was collected on 12th April.

Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Patrick Bohan  

Patrick Bohan, aged 37, was a shopkeeper.  His wife, Mary, who was born in King’s Co. was 39 years.  Their son, John, was 2 years old and their daughter, Mary was 9 months old.  There were 2 other residents in the house on the night of the census.  Mary Duane, aged 24 and single, whose occupation was given as National School Teacher; and an 18 year old female servant named Margaret Lantry, who was also unmarried.  The 6 occupants of house 55 were Roman Catholic and 5 were born in Co. Galway.  The 4 adults could read and write.

According to Form B 1, Patrick Bohan had a shop and private dwelling with 1 out-office on the site.  The 1st class house had 7 rooms occupied by the family, 8 windows in front, a slate, iron or tile roof and brick, stone or concrete walls.

The census form, signed by Patrick Bohan, was collected on 12th April.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Daniel Nolan

Daniel Nolan was a 57 year old farmer.  His sister, Bridget, was aged 41.  Both were born in Co. Galway.  Also in the house was a servant named Eliza Kennedy who was 15 years old and born in Co. Tipperary.  The 3 residents were single, could read and write and were Roman Catholic.

Daniel Nolan’s private dwelling was listed as a 2nd class house.  The walls were of stone, brick or concrete, the roof was of slate, iron or tiles, there were 5 windows in front and 7 rooms were occupied.

Form B 1 gave the number of out-offices on the site as 8.

Form A, signed by Daniel Nolan, was collected on 12th April.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

Eliza Bernard

Eliza Bernard was alone in house 57.  Eliza was a shopkeeper, aged 54.  She was Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway, single, and could read and write.

Eliza’s 2nd class house had 2 rooms, 3 front windows, a thatch or wood roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

No out-offices were recorded.

Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.  The census form was signed by Eliza Bernard and collected on 12th April, 1901.

Patrick Cunniff (sic)

Patrick Cuniff, a 54 year old farmer, who was unmarried, was alone in house 58.1 on the night of the census.  Patrick was Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway, could read and write and spoke Irish and English.

He signed the census form which was collected on 12th April.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

John Callanan

John Callanan, his wife Mary, and their daughter also named Mary, were residents of house 58.2.  John was a 34 year old general labourer.  Mary was aged 26 and their daughter was 3 months old.  All 3 were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic.  Both parents were able to read and write.

Form B 1 indicated that Patrick Cunniff and the Callanan family lived in house 58.  Five rooms were occupied by 4 persons.

The 2nd class house had stone, brick or concrete walls, a slate, iron or tile roof and 2 front windows.

Two out-offices were recorded on the site.

John Callanan, signed the census form.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator for house 58.

Pat Shiel 

Pat Shiel was a 28 year old farmer.  His wife, Winnifred was 35 years.  There were 5 other people in the house on the night of the census: Pat’s brother-in-law, Pat Campbell, a farm servant, aged 49; Pat’s 2 brothers, John, 25, and Jerome, 15, both of whom were shoemakers;  Martin Connare (sic), 29, and Owen Burns, 16, both were boarders in the house and their occupation was given as blacksmith.  The 7 residents could read and write, were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.

Pat Shiel had a private dwelling and 5 out-offices.  The house, listed as 2ndclass, had stone, brick or concrete walls, a thatch or wood roof, 3 front windows and 5 rooms were occupied.

No records available on line regarding types of out-offices.

The census form, signed by Pat Shiel, was collected on 12th April.  The Enumerator was Jno. Harte, Constable.

Annie Lyons

Annie Lyons was the only resident of house 60.  She was a 28 year old shopkeeper, who was single, Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

Annie had a shop and private dwelling.  Her 2nd class house had stone, brick or concrete walls, a slate, iron or tile roof, 5 front windows and 6 rooms.

Four out-offices were listed: a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house.

Form A, signed by Annie Lyons, was collected on 12th April.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

John Matthews

John Matthews, his wife Anne, their 8 children and a boarder, named Ellen Kelly, were residents of house 61.  John was a 43 year old shopkeeper.  Anne was also aged 43.  Their children were: Margaret, 16; Bridget, 15; John, 12; Mary Anne, 11; Patrick David, 9; Richard, 7; Sarah, 5 and Thomas who was 3.  The children, except Thomas, were listed as scholars.  Ellen Kelly, a 63 year old widow, was a general servant.  The 11 occupants were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.  The 2 younger children were the only family members unable to read and write.

John Matthews had a shop and private dwelling as well as 9 out-offices.  The 1st class house had 7 rooms occupied by the family, 7 front windows, a slate, tile or iron roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

The out-offices included 1 stable, 3 cow houses, 1 calf house, 2 piggeries and 2 sheds.

John Matthews signed the census form which was collected on 12th April.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

Mary Flood

Mary Flood was a shopkeeper, aged 74.  She was listed as a widow and head of family in 1901.  Her 2 daughters, Nora and Maggie and her grandchild, Mary Foley, were also in the house.  Nora was aged 30, single and was a dressmaker.  Maggie, too, was single, a schoolteacher, aged 28.  Mary was an 11 year old scholar.  The 4 occupants were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and were able to read and write.

Mary Flood had a shop and private dwelling.  Her 2nd class house had 3 rooms occupied by the family, 5 front windows, a slate, tile or iron roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

The 3 out-offices, listed on Form B 1, were a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

Form A, signed by Mary Flood, was collected on 12th April.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

James Dunne

James Dunne and his wife, Mary, were residents of house 63.  James, a 71 year old police pensioner, was born in Co. Tipperary. Mary was 62 years and was born in Co. Galway.  Both persons were Roman Catholic and could read and write.

James’s private dwelling, listed as a 2nd class house, had 2 rooms, 2 front windows, a slate, iron or tile roof and brick, stone or concrete walls.

The 2 out-offices on the site were a piggery and a turf house.

James Dunne signed Form A which was collected on 12th April.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

John Robinson

John Robinson was a national teacher, who, according to Form A, was aged 61, in 1901.  His wife, Kate, 64, was born in King’s Co. and her occupation was given as “Pensioner NI Teacher”.  Their son, John, 29, was an assistant national teacher as was their daughter, Mary, who was 25 years.  The younger daughter, Eleanor, was 19 and she was a scholar.  The 6th person in the house was a general domestic servant named Mary Coyne who was aged 72 and unable to read, but spoke Irish and English.  John (senior) and John (junior) also spoke Irish and English.  All the occupants were Roman Catholic.  The 3 siblings and Mary Coyne were unmarried, and, as well as John (senior) were born in Co. Galway.

The Robinson’s private dwelling, a 2nd class house, had stone, brick or concrete walls, a slate, tile or iron roof, 3 windows in front and 5 rooms were occupied by the family.

Five out-offices were listed on Form B 2 and they included a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery and a turf house.

The census form, signed by John Robinson, as head of family, was collected on 12th April.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

Michael Flannery

Michael Flannery, his wife Bridget and their children were residents of house 65 in Killimor.

Michael, aged 52, and named as head of family, was a bootmaker.  Bridget was 42 in 1901.  The older son, James, 19, was a rural postman; the second son, John, aged 17, was also a rural postman; Delia, 14, was a scholar, as was 10 year old Ellie; the younger son, Michael, 7, was also listed as a scholar.  All family members were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

Flannery’s 3rd class house had 2 rooms occupied by the family, 2 front windows, a thatch or wood roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

The 2 out-offices recorded on Form B 2 were a piggery and a fowl house.

Michael Flannery signed Form A which was collected on 12th April.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Mary Horan

Mary Horan and her brother, Patk., were both unmarried.  Thirty-eight year old Mary was a dressmaker, and Patk., aged 26, was a tailor.  Both were born in Co. Galway, were Roman Catholic and could read and write.

Horan’s private dwelling, a 2nd class house, had stone, brick or concrete walls, a slate, iron or tile roof, 5 front windows and 5 rooms.

One out-office, a turf house, was listed on Form B 2.

Mary Horan, as head of family, signed the census form which was collected on 12th April.  The Enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

Killimor Nat. School

Killimor Nat. School was recorded as No. 67 on Form B 1.

Killimor Courthouse

Killimor Courthouse was recorded as No. 68 on Form B 1.

1911 Census

Killimor and Boleybeg

The 1911 census recorded the following information under the heading name of the landholder on whose holding the house was situated: Killimor town was owned by three landlords namely the Marquis of Clanricarde, Capt. Denis St. George Daly & Michael Lynch.  The Enumerator on this occasion was William Pender, Constable of the Constabulary District of Portumna.

Mary Campbell

Mary Campbell and her 2 daughters were residents of house 1 in Killimor Town in 1911 according to Form A.  Mary, aged 73, was a widow and her occupation was given as old-age-pensioner.  Her older daughter, Maria, a dressmaker was 34 and the second girl, Winifred was 31 years of age.  Both girls were single.  The 3 occupants were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

Mary’s private dwelling, listed as a 2nd class house, had 5 rooms, 4 front windows, stone, brick or concrete walls and a slate, tile or iron roof.

As well as the house there were 2 out-offices on the site: a piggery and a barn.

The census form, signed by Mary Campbell, was collected on April 11th.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Michael Flannery

Michael Flannery and his wife, Bridget, were married for 39 years and had 8 children, 7 of whom were living.  Michael, a bootmaker, was aged 75 and Bridget was 63 years.  Four of their children lived with them in 1911: James, 27, a postman; John, 25, also a postman; Ellie was 19 and the younger son, Michael, a labourer, was 18 years.  The Flannery family were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and each member could read and writer.

Michael Flannery’s 3rd class house had 2 rooms occupied by the family, 2 windows in front, a thatch or wood roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

Form B 1 indicated that there were 5 out-offices on the site which were listed on Form B 2 as 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 shed.

Michael Flannery, as head of family, signed the census form which was collected on April 11th.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

John Robinson  

John Robinson, aged 43, was a national school teacher and also a widower in 1911.  John and his 2 cousins, Margaret and Ellen Larkin, were residents of house 3.  Margaret was aged 30 and Ellen was 34; both were single and their occupation was not given.  John was born in Co. Galway and his cousins’ birthplace was recorded as Co. Wexford.  The 3 occupants were Roman Catholic and could read and write; in addition John spoke Irish and English.

John Robinson’s private dwelling, a 2nd class house, had stone, brick or concrete walls, a slate, tile or iron roof, 3 front windows and 7 rooms.

Included in the 4 out-offices were a fowl house, a piggery, a cow house and a shed.

The census form, signed by John Robinson, was collected on April 11th.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Joseph Ryan 

Joseph Ryan, listed as a 30 year old farmer, was head of family, in house 4.  His wife, Nora, aged 38, was the local postmistress.  There were 4 other people in the house on the night of the census: Joseph’s widowed mother-in-law, Mary Flood, 83; his sister-in-law, Margaret Flood, 34, a school teacher; a relative named Jane Foley who was aged 15 and listed as a scholar; Mary C. Halloran, a boarder aged 27, a school teacher, who was born in Co. Clare.  The 3 younger residents were single at this stage.  All the occupants were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway (except Mary Halloran), and could read and write.  Four spoke Irish and English: Mary Flood, Margaret Flood, Jane Foley and Mary C. Halloran.

Joseph’s 2nd class house, described on Form B 1 as post office, had 7 rooms occupied by the residents, 5 front windows, stone, brick or concrete walls and a slate, tile or iron roof.

Five out-offices were listed and they included a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a shed.

Joseph Ryan signed Form A which was collected on April 11th.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

John Matthews

John Matthews and his wife, Anne, were both aged 56.  They were married for 29 years and had 9 children, 8 of whom were living.  John’s occupation was recorded as farmer and shop keeper.  Six of their children were in the house on the night of the census: Bridget aged 26, Mary Anne who was 21, David aged 19, 17 year old Joseph, next was Sarah who was 15 and the younger boy, Thomas, aged 13.  Also in the house was a farm servant named Patrick Grady, who was 28 years old.  David was a farmer and the 3 younger children were scholars.  The 9 occupants were born in Co. Galway, were Roman Catholic and were able to read and write.

John Matthews’ 1st class house, listed as a public house, had 7 rooms occupied by the family, 8 front windows, a slate, iron or tile roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.  Included in the 8 out-offices recorded on Form B 1 were a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a dairy, a piggery, a fowl house, a barn and a shed.

John Matthews, as head of family, signed the census form which was collected on April 11th 1911.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Joseph Kenny

Joseph Kenny, aged 52, was an RIC Pensioner.  He and his 38 year old wife, Mary Josephine, were married for 19 years and had 6 children, 5 of whom were living.  The children in the house on the night of the census were: Mary Josephine 17; Anne Bedelia, 15; Joseph Gregory, 14; John Henry, 9.  Also in the house was Joseph’s sister-in-law, 37 year old Annie Treacy, who was a single lady.  Joseph was born in Co. Westmeath, his wife and sister-in-law in Co. Galway and the children’s birthplace was given as King’s Co.  All the residents were Roman Catholic and could read and write.  In addition, the 4 children spoke Irish and English.

Joseph Kenny’s private dwelling, a 2nd class house, had 4 rooms occupied by the family, 5 windows in front, a slate, iron or tile roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

The 3 out-offices listed were a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

The census form, signed by Joseph Kenny, was collected on April 11th.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Patrick Shiel

Patrick Shiel and his wife, Winifred, were residents of house 7 in Killimor Town.  Patrick was a 45 year old farmer who was married for 13 years to 61 year old Winifred and they had no children.  Patrick’s brother-in-law, Patrick Campbell, aged 70 and listed as a farm servant, was also in the house.  The 3 occupants were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

Patrick’s private dwelling, a 2nd class house, had 3 rooms, 3 front windows, a thatch or wood roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

Three out-offices were recorded and they included a piggery, a cow house and a stable.

The Enumerator in 1911 was William Pender, Constable.  Patrick Shiel signed Form A which was collected on April 11th.

Eliza Bernard 

Eliza Bernard was a 72 year old unmarried lady who lived alone.  Her occupation was given as huckster.  Eliza was born in Co. Galway, was Roman Catholic and could read and write.

Eliza’s 2nd class house had 3 rooms, 3 windows in front, a thatch or wood roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

There was 1 out-office, a piggery, on the site.

Eliza Bernard signed the census form which was collected on April 11th.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Daniel Nolan  

Daniel Nolan was a 71 year old retired shop keeper.  In the house with him were his sister, Bridget, 57, and a domestic servant, aged 15 and named as Sarah Kenny.  The 3 residents were single, Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

Daniel Nolan’s private dwelling was listed as a 1st class house.  It had 7 rooms, 4 windows in front, a slate, tile or iron roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

Twelve out-offices were recorded on Form B 1 and they included a stable, a coach house, a harness room, a cow-house, a dairy, a fowl house, a boiling house, a turf house, a work shop, a shed, a store and a laundry.

Daniel Nolan, as head of family, signed the census form which was collected on April 11th.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Lucy Delahunt

Lucy Delahunt, her sister, Delia and her uncle, James Nolan, were residents of house 10 in Killimor Town.  Lucy, aged 29, was a shopkeeper; Delia’s occupation was not given; James, 65 years, was a miller.  The 3 occupants were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway, were unmarried and could read and write.  In each case on Form A under the heading “Irish Language” was written “English”.

Lucy’s 2nd class dwelling was listed as a public house, with 8 rooms, 4 front windows, tile, slate or iron roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

In addition, there were 3 out-offices on the site: a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

As head of family, Lucy Delahunt signed Form A which was collected on April 11th.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Michael Foley

Michael Foley and his wife, Jane, were married for 23 years.  They had 11 children born alive, 7 of whom were still living.  Michael, a farmer, was aged 65 and Jane was 48.  Six of their children were in the house on the night of the census: Mary, 21, a teacher; Margaret aged 19 whose occupation was not recorded; John Joe, 14, a scholar; Thomas, 12, also a scholar; the 2 younger daughters, Hanoria Mary, aged 10 and Ellen Josephine who was 4 years, and who were both listed as scholars.  All the family members were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway.  Five of the family could read and write; Michael was able to read and Ellen Josephine was unable to do so.  In addition, all the Foleys, except Ellen Josephine, spoke Irish and English.

Michael Foley’s 2nd class house had stone, brick or concrete walls, a slate, tile or iron roof, 6 front windows and 8 rooms occupied by the family.

The out-offices included a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.

Michael Foley was listed as head of family but it was Jane Foley who signed Form A.  The form was collected on April 8th.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Julia Griffin 

Julia Griffin was a 70 year old widow whose occupation was given as shop keeper.  There were 4 other persons in the house on the night of the census: Julia’s niece, Winefred Griffin, aged 70, who was married for 23 years and had 1 child who was still living; Julia’s nephew, Michael Griffin, 18 years; John Tuohy, a 35 year old unmarried general servant; Mary Kennedy, a domestic servant who was 17 years old.  All the residents were born in Co. Galway, were Catholic and could read and write.

Julia’s residence was listed as a public house.  This 2nd class house had stone, brick or concrete walls, a slate, tile or iron roof, 5 windows in front and 6 rooms occupied by the residents.

Five out-offices were listed and they included a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.

The census form, signed by Julia Griffin as head of family, was collected on April 8th.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Bridget Mera (sic)

Bridget Mera was a 69 year old single woman who was alone in house 13.  She was Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway, could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  Her occupation was not recorded.

Bridget’s 2nd class house, a private dwelling, had 2 rooms, 2 front windows, stone, brick or concrete walls and a slate, tile or iron roof.

There were no out-offices recorded on Form B 2.

The census form was signed by Bridget Mera and collected on April 8th 1911.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

John Kirwan  

John and Mary Kirwan were residents of house 14 in Killimor Town.  John, a shop keeper, was aged 30 and Mary was 32 years old.  In the column on Form A headed “Relation to Head of Family”, John was recorded as son and Mary as sister.  Both persons were born in Co. Galway, could read and write and John spoke English.  Their religious profession was given as Catholic Church.

Kirwan’s residence was a public house and listed as 2nd class with stone, brick or concrete walls, a slate, tile or iron roof, 5 front windows and 8 rooms.

Form B 1 recorded 8 out-offices on the site and they included 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn, 1 workshop and 1 shed.

Form A, signed by John Kirwan, was collected on April 8th.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Patrick Byrne

Patrick Byrne was a 51 year old victualler who was born in King’s County.  His mother, Bridget M., was 72, a widow by 1911, and was also born in King’s County.  Patrick’s wife, Mary, was aged 37.  Their children’s names were: John J.B. who was 4; three year old James V.; next was Thomas G. aged 1 and the younger child, Mary J. was under 1 month old.  Mary and the 4 children were born in Co. Galway.  The family’s religious profession was given as Catholic, and the 3 adults were able to read and write.

Patrick Byrne’s 2nd class house had stone, brick or concrete walls, a slate, tile or iron roof, 3 windows in front and 4 rooms occupied by the family.

The 3 out-offices on the site were a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

The Household Return was signed by Patrick Byrne and was collected on April 3rd.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Frank Soughley

Frank Soughley and his wife, Margaret, were married for 22 years.  They had 8 children all of whom were living.  Frank was a farmer, aged 48 and Margret (sic) was 43 years.  The children in the house on the night of the census were: John 19, a labourer who was single; Margret, aged 11; Bridget who was 10; 7 year old Annie and Frank who was 3 years old.  The younger children, except Frank, were listed as scholars.  The Soughley family were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic.  The parents and children, except the 3 year old, could read and write.  Three of the children spoke Irish and English: Margret, Bridget and Annie.

Soughley’s private dwelling was a 2nd class house with a slate, tile or iron roof, stone, brick or concrete walls, 5 front windows and 3 rooms occupied by the family.

There were 3 out-offices on the site: a stable, a piggery and a shed.

The census form, signed by Frank Soughley, was collected on April 3rd.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Catherine Cleary 

Catherine Cleary lived alone in house 17 in Killimor Town.  She was aged 72, a widow and an old-age-pensioner.  Her birthplace was recorded as Galway ER and her religion as Roman Catholic.  Catherine could read and write and spoke Irish and English.

Her 2nd class house had 4 rooms, 5 windows in front, stone, brick or concrete walls and a tile, slate or iron roof.

The 2 out-offices listed were a piggery and a shed.

Catherine Cleary signed the census form which was collected on April 3rd.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Bridget Hobbs 

Bridget Hobbs was married for 17 years and did not have any children.  She was aged 50 and her occupation was given as farmer.  Her sister and brother were also in the house; Margaret Sullivan aged 45 and Benjamin Sullivan who was a 34 year old labourer.  The 3 residents were Roman Catholic; born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

Form B 1 indicated that 1 person in the family was sick on 2nd April 1911.

Bridget Hobbs’ house, listed as 2nd class, had a slate, tile or iron roof, stone, brick or concrete walls, 3 front windows and 4 rooms.

The 4 out-offices on the site were a stable, a cow house, a calf house and a piggery.

As head of family, Bridget signed Form A which was collected on April 3rd.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Bernard Joseph Kelly

Bernard Joseph Kelly was a cycle agent.  He was 23 years old and married for 1 year to Lilly Mary Kelly, who was 21.  They had 1 child, under 6 months, named Michael Maurice.  Bernard Joseph’s sister, Nellie Kelly, a 35 year old servant, was also in the house.  The 4 occupants were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.  The adults could read and write and Lilly Mary spoke Irish and English.

Kelly’s 2nd class house had 4 rooms occupied by the family, 3 front windows, a slate, tile or iron roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

There is no record on Form B 2 of any out-offices on the site.

Bernard Joseph Kelly signed the Household Return as head of family.  The form was collected on April 3rd.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Thomas Felle 

Thomas Felle, 33, and his wife, Winifred, 32, were married for 2 years and had 1 child, Mary Ellen, who was 1 year old.  Thomas’s occupation was given as carpenter.  Also in the house was a 25 year old single man, named William Murphy, who was also a carpenter.  The 4 residents were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway and the 3 adults could read and write.

Thomas Felle’s private dwelling was recorded as a 3rd class house.  Three rooms were occupied by the family; the walls were of stone, brick or concrete; the roof was of thatch or wood and there were 2 windows in front.

Two out-offices were listed on Form B 2, a cow house and a piggery.

Thomas Felle signed the census form which was collected on April 3rd 1911.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Mary O’Loughlin

Mary O’Loughlin resided in house 21.  She was an old-age-pensioner, aged 71, a widow, who was born in Co. Galway and who was unable to read.  There were 3 boarders in the house: a 37 year old tailor named Peter Coniry, who was born in Co. Tipperary; Patrick Kelly, aged 37, who was also a tailor, born in Co. Clare; a painter, named Peter Reidy, who was 30 and whose birthplace was Co. Cork.  The 4 occupants were Roman Catholic; the 3 boarders, who were single, could read and write and one of them, Peter Reidy, spoke Irish and English.

Mary’s house, listed as 3rd class, had stone, brick or concrete walls, a thatch or wood roof, 2 front windows and 3 rooms.

Form B 2 recorded 1 out-office, a piggery, on the site.

The census form, signed by Mary O’Loughlin, was collected on April 3rd.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Bridget Carroll

Bridget Carroll, aged 66 and single, was the only resident of house 22.  She was Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.  Her occupation was not recorded.

Bridget’s 2nd class house had walls of stone, brick or concrete, a thatch or wood roof, 3 front windows and 4 rooms.

She had 3 out-offices: a stable, a cow house and a shed.

Bridget Carroll signed Form A which was collected on April 3rd 1911.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Matthew Rudden

Matthew Rudden, a 66 year old farmer, and his wife, Ellen, 60, were married for 24 years and had 1 child, a daughter named Mary Clare, who was 21 in 1911.  Also in the house were Thos. Y. Pelly, aged 10, who was Matthew’s nephew, and a 75 year old servant named Margaret Lantry.  The 5 occupants were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway, except Matthew whose birthplace was given as Co. Cavan.  Margaret was unable to read but spoke Irish and English; the others could read and write.

Matthew’s house, listed as 2nd class, had 9 rooms occupied by the family, 5 windows in front, a slate, tile or iron roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

Included in 7 out-offices, recorded on Form B 2, were a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a dairy, a fowl house, a barn and a shed.

The Household Return was signed by M. Rudden and collected on April 3rd.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Patrick Gibbs

Patrick Gibbs, 43, was a publican and butcher.  He and his wife, Winifred, 23, were married for 3 years and did not have any children by 1911.  Another resident in the house was an 18 year old barmaid named Margaret M. Canniff, who was single.  The 3 occupants were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

Patrick Gibbs’s residence was listed as a public house, 2nd class, with 6 rooms, 5 front windows, stone, brick or concrete walls and  a slate, tile or iron roof.

There were 5 out-offices on the site: a potato house, a piggery, a cow house, a calf house and a stable.

The Enumerator in 1911 was William Pender, Constable.  Form A was signed by Patrick Gibbs and collected on April 3rd.

Mary Houlihan

Mary Houlihan, 75, was a widow and old-age-pensioner.  Her son, Michael, 43, was a farm labourer and was single.  There was a boarder in the house on the night of the census: a farm labourer named Timothy Foorde (sic), aged 25 and single.  All 3 persons were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway; they could read and write and Mary and Michael spoke Irish and English.

Mary’s private dwelling, a 2nd class house, had 3 rooms, 3 front windows, stone, brick or concrete walls and a thatch or wood roof.

Two out-offices, a piggery and a stable, were recorded on Form B 2.

It appears that Form A was signed by Mary Holohan (sic) as head of family, but “her x mark” was also included but not witnessed by the Enumerator.  The signature of the Enumerator on the form was that of William Pender, Constable.

 Martin Connaire 

Martin Connaire, 39, and his wife, Catherine, 50, were married for 9 years and had one child, Bridget Agnes, who was 7 years old in 1911.  Martin was a blacksmith and Bridget Agnes was a scholar.  There were 2 other people in the house: Thomas Larkin, a 20 year old apprentice blacksmith, and a widow who was deaf, named Mary Finn, aged 80, who was listed as a boarder and old-age-pensioner.  The 5 residents were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway, could read and write and spoke English.

Martin Connaire’s 2nd class house had stone, brick or concrete walls, a thatch or wood roof, 3 front windows and 3 rooms occupied by the family.

Three out-offices were recorded and they included a cow house, a piggery and a store.

The Household Return was signed by Martin Connaire and was collected on April 3rd.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Bridget Duffy 

Bridget Duffy, aged 62 and single, was a publican.  Also in house 27 were Bridget’s niece, Mary A. Keating, 35, who too was a publican; Bridget’s 12 year old nephew, William Brien, a scholar; a farm servant named James Madden, aged 45.  All 4 were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway, could read and write, spoke Irish and English and were single.

Bridget Duffy’s public house was recorded as 1st class on Form B 1.  Seven rooms were occupied by the family; there were 6 front windows, the walls were of stone, brick or concrete and the roof was of slate, tile or iron.

Bridget had 9 out-offices: a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a fowl house, a boiling house, a barn, a shed and a store.

Bridget Duffy, as head of family, signed the census form which was collected on April 13th.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

John Duddy

John Duddy and his brother, Thomas Duddy, were residents of house 28 in Killimor Town on the night of the census.  John, 48, was married and his occupation was given as shopkeeper.  Thomas, 34, was single and worked as a shop manager.  Both men were born in Co. Galway, were Roman Catholic, could read and write and spoke Irish and English.

In the Houses section of Form B 1, John Duddy’s residence was recorded as shop.  The 1st class building had a roof of slate, iron or tiles, walls of stone, brick or concrete, 9 windows in front and 8 rooms occupied by the family.

Six out-offices were listed which included a stable, a coach house, a cow house, a shed and 2 stores.

The Household Return, signed by John Duddy, was collected on April 13th.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Ellen Kelly

Ellen Kelly, 72, was a widow and an old-age-pensioner in 1911.  John Kelly, 50, was a boarder in the house, was married and worked as a butcher.  Another boarder was a barrack servant named Mary Kelly, aged 48; Mary was married for 16 years and had 2 children born alive, both of whom were still living.  The 3rd boarder was Bridget Loughnane, a 64 year old seamstress; Bridget was married for 15 years, and had 1 child who was still living.  Ellen was born in Co. Galway and the other residents were born in Co. Clare.  Ellen was unable to read or write and spoke English.  Bridget could not read.  All 4 residents were Roman Catholic.

Ellen Kelly’s private residence was a 2nd class house with stone, brick or concrete walls, a slate, tile or iron roof, 2 front windows and 2 rooms.

There were no out-offices on Ellen’s site.

Ellen Kelly’s mark x on the census form was witnessed by William Pender, Constable, who was the Enumerator.  The Household Return was collected on April 13th.

Mary Anne Leo

Mary Anne Leo was a 36 year old single woman, who was a housekeeper.  She was Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

Her house, listed as 2nd class, had 2 rooms, 2 front windows, stone, brick or concrete walls, and a slate, tile or iron roof.

She had 1 out-office, a piggery.

Mary Anne Leo signed the census form which was collected on April 13th.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Bridget McDermott

Bridget McDermott and 4 boarders were residents of house 31.  Bridget, aged 70, was an old-age-pensioner and widow, and was listed as head of house.  The boarders’ surname was Conroy; Mary, a widow, aged 69 was a dressmaker; Pat, 30 and single, was a farm servant; Thomas, 26, and Christopher, 20, were also single and they too were farm servants; Annie was a 16 year old schoolgirl.  The 5 occupants were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway.  The 4 Conroys could read and write and Bridget McDermott was able to read.

Bridget’s private dwelling, a 3rd class house, had stone, brick or concrete walls, a thatch or

wood roof, 2 front windows and 2 rooms.

She did not have any out-offices.

On Form A, the signature of head of family was that of Mrs. Bridget McDermott.  Under the signature was written the word “mark”.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable, and the form was collected on April 13th.

Joseph M. Mullooly

Joseph M. Mullooly was married to Margaret A. for 2 years and they had one child, Marian J.  Joseph was a 37 year old Constable R.I.C.  Margaret was 25 and Marian was 1 year old.  Joseph and Margaret were born in Co. Longford and their daughter’s birthplace was recorded as Co.-Queens.  The 3 family members were Roman Catholic and both parents could read and write.

Mullooly’s 2nd class house had stone, brick or concrete walls, a slate, tile or iron roof, 5 front windows and 4 rooms occupied by the family.

There were 2 out-offices on the site: a piggery and a shed.

The census form, signed by Joseph M. Mullooly, was collected on April 14th.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Patrick Nagle 

Patrick Nagle was a Roman Catholic Clergyman, aged 31, in 1911.  He was born in Co. Clare, could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  Mary Read, a 55 year old single woman was also in the house.  Her occupation was recorded as domestic servant and cook.  Mary was Roman Catholic, born in Co. Westmeath, and could read and write.

The private dwelling occupied by Revd. P.J. Nagle was a 3rd class house.  It had 4 rooms, stone/brick or concrete walls, a thatch or wood roof and 2 front windows.

The 2 out-offices recorded on Form B 2 were a fowl house and a shed.

The signature on the Household Return was that of Patrick Nagle.  The form was collected on April 14th and the Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Form H – Return of Military, R.I. Constabulary or Metropolitan Police, in Barracks

  1. P.K., Sergeant R.I.C., Roman Catholic, could read and write, Age 41, was national teacher before enlistment, married, born in Limerick.
  2. M., Constable R.I.C., Roman Catholic, could read and write, age 51, was farmer’s son before enlistment, single, born in Sligo.
  3. R., Constable R.I.C., Protestant Irish Church, could read and write, age 35, was farmer’s son before enlistment, single, born in Carlow.
  4. B., Constable R.I.C., Roman Catholic, could read and write, age 39, was farmer’s son before enlistment, single, born in King’s County.
  5. H., Constable R.I.C., Protestant Irish Church, could read and write, age 24, was farmer’s son before enlistment, single, born in Tyrone.
  6. L., Constable R.I.C., Roman Catholic, could read and write, age 21, was scholar before enlistment, single, born in Cork.

The premises, recorded as house 34.1 and occupied by the above named people, was the R.I.C. Barrack.

The building, recorded as 2nd class, had 2 rooms, 2 front windows, a slate, tile or iron roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

The 2 out-offices on the site were a turf house and a shed.

Edward P. Kerriss was named on Form B 1 as head of the family residing in the house.

Mary Kathleen Kerriss and her son were residents of house 34.2.  The following was recorded on Form A – “Note: The Head of the family was returned on Form H”.  Mary Kathleen, aged 28, was married for 11 years and had 1 child who was still living. Her son, John Ray was a 10 year old scholar.  Mother and son were Roman Catholic and could read and write.  Their birthplaces were given as Co. Galway and Co. Mayo, respectively.

Edward P. Kerriss signed Form A, as head of family.  The form was collected on April 14th.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

John Connaughton

John Connaughton, aged 32, was a tea, wine and spirit merchant.  He was married to 30 year old Rosie for 3 years and they had 2 children, Michael, 1 year old, and Peter who was 1 month. Other residents in the house included a domestic servant named Bridget Fahey, 14; Michael Eames, 36, an unemployed carpenter who was married and listed as a boarder; a second boarder, Delia Eames, aged 34 and married.  All the occupants were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. The 5 adults could read and write.

Connaughton’s residence was listed as a public house, 2nd class, with stone, brick or concrete walls, a slate, tile or iron roof, 5 front windows and 6 rooms occupied by the family.

Among the 6 out-offices recorded on Form B 2 were a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house, a barn and a shed.

John Connaughton, as head of family, signed Form A which was collected on April 14th.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Michael Duffy

Michael Duffy, aged 33 and single, was a grocer.  With him in house 33 were: his cousin, 13 year old Timothy Nevin, who was a scholar; a male servant named Michael Flannery, 18 years old.  The 3 residents were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.  Michael Flannery could not read or write.

Michael Duffy’s shop was listed as a 2nd class  house.  It had 5 rooms, 3 windows in front, a slate, tile or iron roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

Form B 2 listed 4 out-offices which included 1 stable, 2 sheds and 1 store.

The census form, signed by Michael Duffy, was collected on April 14th.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Timothy Kelly 

Timothy Kelly, 35, and his wife, Ellen, 25, were married for 3 years and had 2 children, both of whom were living.  Michael was 2 years old and Mary Ellen’s age was difficult to decipher on Form A.  Timothy’s occupation was listed as baker.  Also in the house was a 27 year old servant named Michael Picket (or Pecket) who was single, and was born in Co. Westmeath. The Kelly family were born in Co. Galway.  All 5 residents were Roman Catholic and the 3 adults could read and write.

Timothy Kelly’s dwelling was documented as a bakery and shop.  It was a 2ndclass house with brick, stone or concrete walls, a slate, tile or iron roof, 2 front windows and 4 rooms.

There were 3 out-offices on the site: a stable, a shed and a bakery.

William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator in 1911.  Form A, signed by Michael Duffy, was collected on April 14th.

John Hough 

John Hough, 70, and Maria, 58, were married for 37 years.  They had 11 children, 6 of whom were living.  John’s occupation was given as blacksmith and farmer.  Other persons in the house of the night of the census were: a daughter, Agnes, aged 30; a son Thomas, 28, who was a blacksmith; a second daughter, 26 year old Delia; another son, named Michael, 21; John’s brother-in-law, Michael Hobbs, 45, recorded as rate-collector and farmer and who was married.  John’s sons and daughters were all single.  All the residents were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

John Hough’s dwelling was documented as a public house, 2nd class, with stone, brick or concrete walls, a slate, tile or iron roof, 4 windows in front and 4 rooms occupied by the family.

There were 6 out-offices recorded on Form B 2 and they included a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a fowl house and a shed.

Form A was signed by John Hough, as head of family and was collected on April 14th.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Harry Stewart 

Harry Stewart, 65, a farmer, and his sister, Ellen, 50, were residents of house 39. Both were single, were Roman Catholic and born in Killimore, Co. Galway and could read and write.  Harry’s private dwelling, a 2nd class house, had 3 rooms, 3 front windows, stone, brick or concrete walls, and a slate, tile or iron roof.

He had 3 out-offices: a cow house, a calf house and a piggery.

Harry Stewart signed the census form which was collected on April 14th.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Margaret Donohoe

Margaret Donohoe, 47, was a single woman, who was alone in house 40.  Margaret, a shopkeeper, was Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

Her private dwelling, a 2nd class house, had 3 rooms, 3 front windows, a slate, tile or iron roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

Margaret’s 1 out-office was a piggery.

Form A, signed by Margaret Donohoe, was collected on April 14th.   The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Michael Larkin

Michael Larkin, 48, and Mary Anne, 35, were married for 6 years.  They had 3 children, all of whom were still living.  Two of the children were in the house on the night of the census:  Patk. John, 5, a scholar, and 2 year old Bernard Clement.  Michael’s occupation was given as publican.  He and his children were born in Co. Galway and Mary Anne’s birthplace was Co. Roscommon.  The parents and Patk. John could read and write, and in addition, Michael and Mary Anne spoke Irish and English.

Michael Larkin’s public house, listed as 1st class, had 8 rooms occupied by the family, 6 front windows, a slate, tile or iron roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

Among the 7 out-offices on the site were 2 stables, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 shed.

Michael Larkin, as head of family, signed the census form which was collected on April 14th.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Patrick Fitzpatrick

Patrick Fitzpatrick was a farmer and publican.  He and Annie were married for 9 years and had 3 children, all of whom were living.  Patrick was aged 41 and Annie was 33 years.  The children were: Mary, 7 a scholar; Francis, 5, also a scholar; Patrick who was 3 years of age.  There were 2 shop assistants in the house, Eliza Monaghan and Mary Hennerty (Finnerty?) both aged 20 and single.  The domestic servant was 17 year old Mary Farrell, who was also single.  All 8 residents were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway.  The only occupants unable to read and write were Francis and Patrick.

Patrick Fitzpatrick’s public house was listed as 1st class.  The walls were of stone, brick or concrete, the roof of slate, tile or iron; there were 6 front windows and 7 rooms occupied by the family.

Nine out-offices were recorded and they included 2 stables, 2 cow houses, 1 calf house, 2 piggeries and 2 sheds.

Form A, signed by Patrick Fitzpatrick, was collected on April 15th 1911.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Michael Lawlor  

Michael Lawlor, 39, and his nephew, Joseph Lawlor, 10, were residents of house 43.  Michael, a single man, was a shoemaker and Joseph was a scholar.  Both were Roman Catholic and could read and write.  Joseph was born in England and his uncle in Co. Galway.

Michael’s 2nd class house had 6 rooms, 4 windows in front, a slate, iron or tile roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

There was no record of any out-offices on Form B 1.

Michael Lawlor signed Form A which was collected on April 15th.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Patrick Curley

Patrick Curley, 49, and Bridget, 39, were married for 5 years and did not have any children by 1911.  Patrick’s occupation was recorded as publican.  There were 4 other residents in the house on the night of the census: a 30 year old domestic servant named Mary Brien, who was single; a 2nd servant, Thomas Houlihan, 28, who was also single; 2 shop assistants, Bridget Conway, 25, and Annie Larkin, aged 19, both of whom were unmarried.  The 6 residents were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.  Bridget Conway and Annie Larkin spoke Irish and English.

Patrick Curley’s public house, listed as 1st class, had 10 rooms, 12 front windows, a slate, tile or iron roof an stone, brick or concrete walls.

Twelve out-offices were recorded on Form B 2 and they included 3 stables,1 coach house, 1 harness room, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 barn, 1 turf house, 2 sheds and 1 store.

The census form, signed by Patrick Curley as head of family, was collected on April 15th.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Martin O’Hara

Martin O’Hara, his wife Kate and 7 children were residents of house 45 in Killimor Town.  Martin, a carpenter, was 45 and Kate was 36.  The children were: Rose, 16; Margaret, 14; Kate, 12; Patrick Joseph, 10; Peter, 8; James, 14; Martin Christopher, 1 year.  All were listed as scholars except Martin.  The 9 family members were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and, except Martin, could read and write.  Rose, Margaret, Kate and Patrick spoke Irish and English.

Martin O’Hara’s private dwelling, a 2nd class house, had stone, brick or concrete walls, a slate, tile or iron roof, 4 front windows and 4 rooms occupied by the family.

Two out-offices were recorded: a piggery and a shed.

Martin O’Hara signed the Household Return which was collected on April 15th.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Thomas Scully 

Thomas Scully, aged 38, was a constable.  He was married for 9 years to Mary Teresa who was 30.  They had 4 children: Mary Kate, 8; Michael John, 5; Thomas Gerard, 4; Patrick Joseph who was 1 month old.  All family members were Roman Catholic.  Thomas was born in Co. Sligo, Mary Teresa in Co. Mayo and the children’s birthplace was Co. Galway.  The parents and Mary Kate could read and write, Michael John was able to read, and the family spoke English.

Thomas Scully’s 2nd class house had 4 rooms, 2 front windows, a slate, tile or iron roof and stone, brick or concrete walls.

There was no record of any out-offices on the site.

Thomas Scully, as head of family, signed the census form which was collected on April 15th.  The Enumerator in 1911 was William Pender, Constable.

William Pender

William Pender, 36, was a Constable R.I.C.  He and Lucy, 28, were married for 3 years and had 2 children: John, 2 and Annamaria, 6 months old.   Parents and children were Roman Catholic.  William was born in Queen’s County, Lucy in Co. Wexford and the children in Co. Galway.

William Pender’s private residence, a 2nd class house, had 2 rooms occupied by the family, 2 windows in front, stone, brick or concrete walls and a slate, tile or iron roof.

One out-office, a fowl house, was recorded on Form B 2.

Form A was signed by William Pender and collected on April 15th by William who was the Enumerator in 1911.

Catherine Connor 

Catherine Connor was a 65 year old widow whose occupation was listed as farmer.  Her son John, 44, a widower, was a farmer’s son and a plumber.  Catherine’s two granddaughters were: Annie, 19 and 16 year old Janet, a scholar.  The 4 family members were Roman Catholic and could read and write.  Catherine was born in Co. Galway, and the birthplace of her son and granddaughters was recorded as England.

Catherine Connor’s 2nd class house had a slate, tile or iron roof, stone, brick or concrete walls, 6 windows in front and 6 rooms.

Five out-offices were recorded on Form B 2 and they included a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery and a shed.

The census form, signed by Catherine Connor as head of family, was collected on April 15th.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

James Haverty

James Haverty was a single man, aged 46, whose occupation was recorded as farmer and wool weaver.  James was Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

His 3rd class house had 2 rooms, 2 front windows, stone, brick or concrete walls and a thatch or wood roof.

There are no out-offices recorded on Form B 1 or Form B 2.

(Note: On Form B 1 the name of the head of family residing in the house was given as Patrick Haverty).

Form A was signed by James Haverty, as head of family, and was collected on April 15th.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

Patrick Cunniffe

Patrick Cunniffe, aged 76 and single, was a farmer who resided in house 50 in 1911.  Patrick was Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway, could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  His 2nd class house had stone, brick or concrete walls, a slate, tile or iron roof, 3 windows in front and 4 rooms.

There was no record of any out-offices on the site.

Patrick Cunniffe signed the census form which was collected on April 15th1911.  The Enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Martin Broderick

Martin Broderick, who resided in house 51 in Killimor Town, was a 70 year old single man.  His occupation was listed as farmer.  He was Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and write.

Martin’s private dwelling, a 2nd class house, had stone, brick or concrete walls, a thatch or wood roof, 3 windows in front and 3 rooms.

The 2 out-offices recorded were a piggery and a fowl house.

The Household Return was signed by Martin Broderick and collected on April 15th.  William Pender, Constable, was the Enumerator.

National School

As recorded on Form B 1.

Public Building

As recorded on Form B 1.

Public Building 

As recorded on Form B 1 which listed 2 out-offices, named on Form B 2 as a stable and a cow house.

Private Dwelling 

An uninhabited private dwelling with 2 out-offices listed on Form B 2 as a stable and a cow house.

Dispensary

Number 57 on Form B 1 is recorded as Dispensary.

 

This page was added on 17/02/2017.

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