Magheramore – Machaire Mór – Great Plain – An Machaire Mór

Two versions of the standard name for this townland, given in the Ordnance Survey Name Books were Magheramore and Mogheramore.  The Irish form was Machaire Mór, meaning great plain.  Rev. Francis Coghlan spelled the name Maugheramore, while George D.H. Kirkaldy spelled it Mogheramore.  Its official Irish spelling today is An Machaire Mór.

Location

Magheramore is in the civil parish of Killimor Bologue.  This townland lies between Oxgrove, Inga, Derradda, Garryad and Garryduff, Killimor and Boleybeg, Rusheeny and Corry.   Circa 1830 it contained a few detached houses, several limekilns and ruins, a corn mill and a trigl. station.  The road from Killimor to Ballinasloe passed through this townland.  On the north side there was a large portion of marsh and on the east side a very small portion of bog.   The remainder of the land contained pasture and some land.  The Ordnance Survey Map showed an eel weir situated between Magheramore and Rusheeny.

Census 1841, 1851

Pre-famine census statistics recorded a population of one hundred and thirteen people in eighteen houses in 1841, reduced to ninety six people residing in twelve houses by 1851.

Griffith’s Valuation 1845-1855

At the time of Griffith’s Valuation, the landowner was Lord Dunsandle, who owned three hundred and seventy four acres and seventeen perches of land, all of which he leased out in ten holdings.  Joseph Hardy rented the biggest holding of land from Lord Dunsandle in three lots, totalling two hundred and thirty eight acres, one rood and thirty eight perches.  On the first lot there was a herd’s house and office (shed), on the second lot of fifteen perches was a cottier’s house and garden, while the third lot had a house, offices and corn mill.  A holding of forty four acres, two roods and five perches, at a total annual valuation of £20.0s.0d., was rented out to Bryan O’Hara, Thomas O’Hara, Patrick O’Hara and Peter O’Hara.  Other tenants, who held small amounts of land, were Michael Costelloe, Michael Burke, Michael Carroll, Thomas Hobbs and Michael Pelly.  Mary Saunders, another tenant, held one acre and eleven perches of land, on which was a house.  John Horsman held sixty two acres, three roods and thirty eight perches of land, on which he had a house and offices. John Goode held a house, office, and two cottiers’ houses on fifteen acres, one rood and eight perches of land.

Census 1861, 1871, 1881 and 1891

Census statistics for the Parish of Killimorbologue recorded fifty two people in eleven houses in 1861 in this townland, reduced to thirty nine people in six houses in 1871. The decline continued with twenty six people living in three houses in 1881 and seventeen people occupying the three houses in 1891.

1901 Census

Four houses were recorded in Magheramore in the 1901 census.  Ernest Hardy was named as the landholder in two cases, whereas John Langtry and James Larkin were listed as head of family.  Eliza Horsman and Margaret Saunders were each recorded as landholder and head of family in the other two houses.  Each house had a slate roof, one having six windows in front, two had three windows, while the forth house had two windows in front.

Eliza Horsman 

Eliza Horsman was a 69 year old widowed farmer and was head of the family.  Residing with her were her son Edward, who was 35 years old and unmarried; her fifteen year old grandson, Richard Taylor, described as a scholar, and Bridget Donohoe, a fifteen year old female general servant.  All occupants were born in Co. Galway and could read and write.  Bridget Donohoe was Roman Catholic and the Horsmans were Church of Ireland.  The land holder Eliza and her family lived in a 1st class private dwelling with six front windows, stone, brick or concrete walls, 8 rooms and a slate or tiled roof.

There were 14 out-offices on the land:  3 stables, 2 piggeries, 2 sheds and 1 of each of the following – coach house, cow house, calf house, fowl house, barn and store.

Eliza Horsman signed the census form.  Jno. E. Harte, Constable was the enumerator.

Margaret Saunders

Margaret Saunders, a widow aged 62, described as a seamstress and head of family, lived in Magheramore.  Three sons lived with her: John, a 35 year old widower, who was a mason; Pat 33 years and Peter, 25 years, both of whom were unmarried tailors.  Also in the house was her 20 year old daughter, Ellen, a seamstress.  The general servant in the house was 15 year old Mary Hoolihan, and Margaret’s granddaughter, Maria Saunders, a scholar.  Maria was born in America and the other residents in Co. Galway.  All could read and write and were Roman Catholic.  Margaret’s house was a 2nd class private dwelling built on her own land, with 3 front windows, 3 rooms, a slate or tiled/slate or iron roof and stone/brick or concrete walls.

She had 1 cow house and 1 piggery as out-offices.

The census form was signed by Margaret Saunders and the enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

John Langtry    

John Langtry was a 56 year old general labourer who lived with his wife, 53 year old Mary Langtry; his daughter, 26 years, also named Mary; his two sons, Joseph a scholar aged 13 and 10 year old John, also a scholar.  John, head of the household, could not read; Mary his wife, could read and the children could read and write.  All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic.  The Langtry’s private dwelling was a 2nd class house and Ernest Hardy was listed as the landholder on whose land the house was situated.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete and the roof was slate/iron or tiles.  There were 2 windows in front and 3 rooms were occupied.

Langtry’s had one out-office, a piggery.

Jno. E. Harte, Constable, witnessed John Langtry’s x mark on the census form

James Larkin 

James Larkin and his 3 siblings occupied house 3 in Magheramore.  James, 27 years, described as a shepherd, was head of family.  His older brother Pat, 37, was also a shepherd, and his younger brother, Peter, 16 years, was a scholar.  His sister Bridget was 29 and her occupation was not given.   All family members were able to read and write, were born in Co. Galway, Roman Catholic and not married.  Their private dwelling, a 2nd class house, was built of stone/brick or concrete, had a slate/iron or tiled roof, 2 front windows and 4 rooms were occupied by the family.  Earnest Hardy was named as landholder where the house was built.

Ten out-offices and farm-steadings were recorded: 2 stables and 2 sheds and 1 of each of the following – coach house, cow house, calf house, piggery, fowl house and barn.

James Larkin signed the census form and the enumerator was Jno. E. Harte, Constable.

1911 Census

It is worth noting that the 1911 census denoted an increase in the number of houses from four to twelve.  Each house had a slate roof, two had five windows in front, one had three, and the remainder had two windows each in front.   New names listed as landholders and head of family were Patrick Gallaher, Michael Hayes, Peter Hanny, Thomas Callaghy, Thomas Houlihan, Mary Duffy, Joseph Laird and Timothy Dooley.  The name James Larkin no longer appeared.  Thomas Hedd (sic) was named as head of family with Capt. Denis St. George Daly as landholder.  The name Mary Lantry replaced that of John Langtry, Edward Horseman replaced the name Eliza Horseman and Patrick Saunders replaced that of Margaret Saunders.

Patrick Saunders

Patrick Saunders, a 45 year old tailor, and his wife Mary, 40 years, were married 8 years, had no children, and lived at house 11 in Magheramore.  While Patrick was head of family, his 38 year old brother Peter, also a tailor, lived in the house.  There were 2 other occupants described as boarders and tailors; 23 year old Owen Commons and 18 year old Patrick Broderick.  All residents were Catholic, born in Galway and were able to read and write.  Peter, Patrick and Owen were single.

The residents occupied 6 rooms in the house, which was listed as 2nd class, with 5 front windows, a slate/iron or tiled roof, and stone/brick or concrete walls.

This private dwelling, built on Patrick’s own land had 5 out-offices: 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Patrick Saunders signed the census form and the enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Thomas Callagy

Thomas Callagy, aged 55, lived with his wife, Margaret, 56, in house 5.  They were married 23 years and had 1 child born to them, but had no children living in 1911.  Thomas and Margaret were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and could read and spoke Irish and English.

They occupied 3 rooms in their 2nd class house which was listed as a private dwelling, built on their own land.  The house had 2 front windows, concrete/brick or stone walls and a slate, tiled, or iron roof.

Thomas Callaghy had 3 out-offices: 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

The enumerator was William Pender, Constable and Thomas Callagy signed the census form.

Timothy Dooley

Timothy Dooley, 74 years, a widower and head of family, lived at house 12.  His occupation was given as “Cotier and old- age- pensioner”.  His 3 children lived with him: Joseph, 30 years, a rural postman and single: Tim, a 16 year old scholar and 27 year old Katie, both of whom were also single.  Timothy was born in Co. Clare and his children in Co. Galway.  All 4 family members were Roman Catholic and could read and write.  Timothy and Tim spoke Irish and English.

Timothy was listed as the landholder on which his private dwelling, described as a 2nd class house, was built.  The walls were of stone/brick or concrete, the roof was slate or tiled, there were 2 windows in front and 3 rooms were occupied by the family.

The Dooley family had 2 out-offices: 1 piggery and 1 fowl house.

Tim Dooley signed the census form and William Pender, Constable, was the enumerator.

Mary Duffy

Mary Duffy, aged 56 years, was a widow and farmer.  She and her 2 sons occupied house 7.  Edward was 25 and Thomas was 19, and both were single, and listed as farmer’s sons.  All 3 were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway and were able to read and write.

The family occupied 3 rooms in their private dwelling described as a 2nd class house, built on Mary’s own land.  The house had 3 windows in front, a slate/iron or tiled roof and the walls of stone/brick or concrete.

There were 3 out-offices: 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

William Pender, Constable was the enumerator and Mary Duffy signed the census form.

Bridget Gallagher

Bridget Gallagher was a widow, old age pensioner and head of family.  Her 3 children lived with her in house 1.  Patrick, aged 45 who was a carpenter: Bernard was 34 years and worked as a farm servant; her daughter, aged 30, also named Bridget, was listed as a seamstress.  The siblings were single and could read and write whereas their mother could read only.  All 4 could speak Irish and English and the family were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway.

Their house had stone, concrete or brick walls, a slate or tiled roof and 3 rooms.  Patrick Gallagher was named as the owner of the land on which their 2nd class house was built.  There was just 1 out-office, namely a piggery.

Bridget Gallagher signed the census form and the enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Peter Hanny

Peter Hanny and his 2 children occupied house 3 in Magheramore.  Peter, the head of family was a 48 year old married farmer.  His daughter, Annie, was a 14 year old scholar and his son Francis was listed as aged 13 and a scholar.  All 3 residents were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic.  Peter could not read but both Annie and Francis could do so and speak Irish and English.

Their house, described as 2nd class, was built on their own land and had 4 rooms; it had 2 windows in front, a roof of slate/iron or tiles and stone/brick or concrete walls.

There were 3 out-offices: 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

William Pender, Constable was the enumerator and Peter Hanney signed the census form.

Michael Hayes

Michael Hayes, who was a 50 year old postman, lived in house 2 with his 54 year old wife Anne.  Michael and Anne were married 20 years, had 4 children born to them and 3 children still living.  Two children lived with them:  16 year old Michael and 12 year old Joseph, both of whom were scholars.  Also in the house was Eliza Madden the grandmother, who was 98, and a widow.  Eliza could not read but the other family members could read and write.  All 5 people were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic.

The family lived in a 2nd class house with a slate/iron or tiled roof, stone/brick or concrete walls, 3 rooms and 2 front windows.  Michael was listed as the owner of the land on which the house was built.

The piggery was the only out-office.

Michael Hayes signed the census form and William Pender, Constable was the enumerator.

Thomas Hodd/Head/Hedd

Thomas Hodd and his wife Bridget occupied house 4.  Thomas, who was a 45 year old carpenter, was listed as head of family.  Bridget was 44.  They were married 11 years and had 6 children, all of whom were living.  The oldest was Mary, aged 9: next was 8 year old Lawrence; Bridget was 7 and Thomas was 5; then came Catherine, aged 3 and the youngest was 1 year old Rose.  All family members were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway ER.  The parents and older children could read and write but Thomas, Catherine and Rose were unable to do so.

Captain Denis St. George Daly owned the land on which their 2nd class house stood.  The house had 2 front windows, a slate/iron or tiled roof, stone/brick or concrete walls and 4 rooms.

There were 4 out-offices: 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery and 1 fowl house.

Thomas Hedd signed the census form and the enumerator was William Pender, Constable

Edward Horsman

Edward Horsman and his family were residents of house 10.  Edward, 47, was listed as a farmer and head of family.  His wife, Mary, was 27.  Edward and Mary were married 9 years and had 7 children, 6 of whom were living: Mary Elizabeth was 7, Hilda Maud was 6, Albert Edward was 4, Adelaide was 3, Ethel was 1 and William’s was 4 months. A nephew, Benjamin Taylor, a 20 year old domestic servant lived with the family.  All nine residents were born in Co. Galway and their religion was described as Irish Church.  Edward Mary and Benjamin could read and write English; Mary Elizabeth could read only and the rest of the siblings could not read.  The 6 older occupants spoke English.

Their house, described as 2nd class, was built on Edward’s own land; it had 8 rooms, 5 windows in front, a tiled/iron or slate roof and stone/brick or concrete walls.

The out-offices and farm-steadings numbered 15: 2 stables, 2 cow houses, 2 piggeries, 2 sheds, and 1 of each of the following – coach house, harness room, calf house, dairy, fowl house, boiling house and barn.

Edward Horsman signed the census form and the enumerator was W. Pender, Constable.

Thomas Houlihan

Thomas Houliahn and his wife Maria were married for 30 years, had 10 children born to them, 8 of whom were living:  Thomas, aged 52, was head of family and described as a cotier (sic): Maria was also 52.  Also in the house were their 20 year old daughter Mary, an 18 year old son James who was a farm labourer, a second daughter, Eliza who was 14, and a second son Francis, aged 10.  All family members were Roman Catholic, born in Co. Galway; and could read and write.  Eliza and Francis could speak Irish and English.

Their house was 2nd class, had 3 rooms, 2 windows in front, stone/brick or concrete walls, a slate/iron of tiled roof and was built on Thomas’s own land.

The two out-offices consisted of a piggery and a fowl house.

Thomas Houlihan signed the census form and the enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

Joseph Laird

Joseph Laird was a 48 year old single man who lived in house 8, and was a farm labourer.  He was born in Co. Galway, was Roman Catholic and could read and write.

His 2nd class house had 3 rooms, 2 windows in front, stone/brick or concrete walls, a slate/iron or tiled roof and was built on his own land.

The out-offices were a piggery and a fowl house.

The enumerator was William Pender, Constable and Joseph Laird signed the census form.

Mary Lantry 

Mary Lantry was a 63 year old widow who worked as a seamstress.  Her 3 children lived with her: Mary, who was 30; Joseph who was a 24 year old labourer and his younger brother, John, who was also a labourer.  The family were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic.  The only family member unable to read was Joseph.  Mary owned the land on which the house was built.

This private dwelling, described as 2nd class, had 2 front windows, 3 rooms, stone/brick or concrete walls and a slate/iron or tiled roof.

There were two out-offices, a fowl house and piggery.

Mary Lantry signed the census form and the enumerator was William Pender, Constable.

 

This page was added on 17/02/2017.

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