Aghalateeve

Achadh Leataoibh

Emma Ruane/Heritage Office, Galway County Council

Aghalateeve Townland Stone
Carmel O'Rourke
My location
Get Directions

Aghalateeve

Civil Parish of Kilbegnet

Achadh Leataoibh, field of the half side

Aghalateeve is located in the civil parish of Kilbegnet, in the barony of Ballymoe, County Galway. It is situated on the west boundary of Kilbegnet parish joining the parish of Ballynakill.

The Down Survey Map (post Cromwell) under the name Aghillatire alias Gortilary, gives ownership of the land to Sir Ulick Bourke (Catholic) in 1670. The survey specifies that there was 964 plantation acres of unprofitable land and 140 acres of profitable land, while 140 plantation acres were forfeited.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books states Aghalateeve contains five portions of bog land. Bog can be found in the north west area, along the northern boundary as well as two portions in the eastern section. There is a road passing through a section of the eastern area, heading south and keeping parallel to the eastern boundary. Tillage and pastoral land make up the remainder of Aghalateeve.

Census 1841 – 1851

In 1851 Aghalateeve consisted of 434 acres, 0 roods and 19 perches. In 1841 there was a total of 253 people, 124 males and 129 females. The population had decreased by 1851 with a total of 129 people, 63 males and 66 females. In 1851, there was a total of 25 houses, all of which were occupied. The poor law valuation paid in 1851 was £126-15-0.

Griffith’s Valuation 1847-1864

According to Griffith’s Valuation, Aghalateeve was owned by Rev. Solomon Richards and others. A portion of bog measuring 23 acres, 1 rood and 8 perches as well as 2 cottier’s houses and garden were kept in fee for £1-10-0. Patrick McDermott, John Waldron and Michael Shallow jointly rented 24 acres, 1 rood and 30 perches of house, office and land and 2 lots of house and land, each paying £3-0-0.

John Kilkeeny paid a total of £4-15-0 for 1 acre, 3 roods and 26 perches of land and 12 acres, 2 roods and 0 perches of house, office and land. Peter Coyne rented 1 acre, 3 roods and 17 perches of land and 10 acres, 1 rood and 32 perches of house, office and land. Peter paid £6-0-0. Michael Coyne and John Coyne jointly rented land measuring 4 acres, 2 roods and 16 perches of land, each paying £1-2-0. Thomas Kilcommon and Peter Ward rented a land and house and land respectively measuring a total of 8 acres, 2 roods and 18 perches. Thomas paid £1-15-0 for the land and Peter paid £2-0-0 for the house and land. Michael Kilcommon and Thomas Kilcommon shared a holding measuring 14 acres, 3 roods and 6 perches. Michael rented the land paying £2-10-0 and Thomas had house and land for £2-15-0. James Neary paid £5-10-0 for 15 acres, 1 rood and 30 perches of land.

John McDermott paid £3-15-0 for house and land; on the same holding Edward Leech paid £1-15-0 for land. The holding measured a total of 15 acres, 2 roods and 38 perches.

Edward Leech and Bryan Leech both rented house, office and land on the same holding measuring a total 16 acres, 1 rood and 12 perches. Edward and Bryan paid £3-5-0.

Hugh Neary (Pat.), William Neary (Pat.), Hugh Neary (Manus), Patrick Rattigan and Winifred Rattigan jointly rented bog measuring 20 acres, 3 roods and 7 perches. They each paid £0-5-0, except Patrick Rattigan who paid £0-10-0 for a larger portion.

Hugh Neary (Pat.) paid £3-10-0 for land measuring 7 acres, 3 roods and 18 perches. William Neary paid £2-15-0 for 6 acres, 1 rood and 14 perches of land. Hugh Neary (Manus) paid £2-15-0 for 6 acres, 1 rood and 14 perches of land. Patrick Rattigan rented land measuring 6 acres, 1 rood and 5 perches of £2-15-0. Patrick Rattigan and James Rattigan shared a holding measuring 9 acres, 0 roods and 32 perches. Patrick paid £3-10-0 for house, office and land, while James paid £2-10-0 for house and land.

Hugh Neary (Manus) paid £6-25-0, Michael Neary paid £7-0-0, Michael Redington paid £4-10-0, James Neary paid £3-10-0 and Mary Neary (Peter) paid £4-15-0 for house and land on the same holding measuring a total of 70 acres, 1 rood and 20 perches. Hugh Neary (Manus) had 2 lots oh house and land on the holding.

Brian Mulvihil paid £1-10-0 for land, while Patrick Hurley paid £3-10-0 for house, office and land on the same holding. The holding measured a total of 14 acres.

Peter Conneely paid £1-10-0 for house and land, William Neary (Hugh) paid £1-15-0 for house and land, Peter Neary (Hugh) paid £4-18-0 for house, office and land, Peter Fannin paid £3-0-0 for land and Martin Hurley paid £1-15-0 for land all on the same holding. The holding measured a total of 35 acres, 2 roods and 3 perches.

Bridget Redington paid a total of £9-0-0 for land measuring 4 acres, 2 roods and 13 perches and 14 acres, 0 roods and 34 perches of house, office and land. Thomas Neary rented land measuring 12 acres, 0 roods and 36 perches and 26 acres, 1 rood and 11 perches of house, office and land for a total of £23-0-0. Bridget Hickey paid a total of £5-10-0 for 3 lots of land and house and land on the same holding. Hugh Neary (Pat) paid £4-10-0 for 3 lots of land, measuring 1 acre, 0 roods and 14 perches, 1 acre, 1 rood and 15 perches and 6 acres, 0 roods and 14 perches respectively.

Martin Neary paid £10-0-0 for 1 acre, 3 roods and 7 perches of land, 1 acre, 0 roods and 24 perches of house, office and land, 2 acres, 2 roods and 15 perches of land and another lot of land measuring 8 acre, 3 roods and 24 perches. Martin Neary and William Neary (Pat) jointly rented garden and house, office and garden paying a total of £1-10-0. William Neary (Pat) paid £0-10-0 for 1 acre, 0 roods and 14 perches of land. William Neary (Pat) and Patrick Neary rented a holding measuring a total of 15 acres, 3 roods and 4 perches. William paid £4-0-0 for land, while Patrick paid £4-10-0 for the house, office and land.

The total annual valuation of rateable property was £176-2-0.

Census 1901

There was a total of 30 households in Aghalateeve in 1901. There was a total population of 157 people, 72 of which were male and 75 were female. All occupants were from County Galway except John James Higgins who was from County Roscommon and Matilda Jane Neary, also from Roscommon. All residents were Roman Catholic. The census forms, which were collected on the 8th of April, showed all houses were listed as private dwellings. There was a 102 out offices and farm steadings, unfortunately there is a B2 census return form missing from the online record. Therefore, the breakdown of various out offices and farm buildings are not available for every household.

Stephen Burke (60) was a shepherd. Stephen lived with his wife Kate (60) and their 3 unmarried children Hubert (25), Walter (23) and Ellen (17). Hubert and Walter both listed their occupation as agricultural labourer. Ellen was listed as shepherd’s daughter. Stephen and his wife could not read, but their 3 children could read and write. Stephen and Kate could speak Irish and English, but no languages were listed for their children. The Burke family lived in a 2nd class house with 2 front windows and 4 rooms. The house walls and roof were made of permanent material. 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 piggery were also located on the land. The land was owned by Michael Neary.

Patt Neary (40) lived with his wife Mary (29) and their 4 sons, Willie (12), Patk (10), John (8), Thomas (3) and 2 daughters Mary Ellen (5) and Celia Aggie (1). Patt worked as a farmer. The 4 eldest children were listed as scholars. All members of the household could read and write, except the 2 youngest members who naturally could not read or write. No language was listed for any members of the Neary family, suggesting they could spoke English only. The Neary family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls were constructed using permanent material while the roof was made of perishable material. Patt Neary owned the land his house was situated on along with 1 stable, 1 coach house, 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Thomas Mulligan (32) listed his occupation as a groom/domestic servant. He lived with his wife Mary (26), their 3 children John (4), Michael (2), Eliza (11 months) and a domestic servant, John James Higgins (13). No occupation was listed for Mary. All members of the household could read and write except the 3 children. English was listed as a language for the Mulligan family, except Eliza, where naturally no language is given. John James could also speak English only. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 4 front windows and 4 rooms. Both the walls and the rood were made of permanent material. There was also 1 stable on the land, which was owned by Michael Neary.

Bridget Neary (79) was a widow who lived with her unmarried daughter Sarah (25). Bridget’s occupation is listed as a cattier while no occupation is listed for Sarah. Both members of the Neary could read and write. Bridget could speak both Irish and English while no language is given for Sarah. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 3 front windows. The walls and roof of the house were made of perishable material. 1 stable and 1 cow house were also located on the land. Michael Neary owned the land.

Bridget Neary (36) was a widowed farmer who lived alone. Bridget could not read, and no language was listed, suggesting she could speak English only. Bridget lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and 3 rooms. Perishable material was used for the walls and the roof. Bridget owned the land her house was situated on along with 1 cow house.

John Connelly (60) lived with his wife Hanoria (45) and their 4 unmarried children, John (18), Sarah (11), Bridget (9) and Anne (7). John was a farmer and his eldest son listed his occupation as farmer’s son, while the 3 youngest children were scholars. John and his wife could not read but their 4 children could read and write. John and Hanoria could speak Irish and English, while no language was given for the children. The Connelly family lived in a 3rd class house with 1 front window and 2 rooms. The walls and roof of the house were perishable material. John owned the land along with 1 cow house.

John Hurley (56) was an unmarried farmer who lived with his widowed sister Margaret Neary (43) and her son James (23). Margaret listed her occupation as farmer’s sister while James describes his occupation as farmer’s nephew. All members of the household could read and write, as well as speak both Irish and English. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls were made of permanent material while roof was perishable material. John owned the land along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

James Dillion (35) lived with wife Maggie (30) and their 8 children. The couple had 5 daughters Mary Ellen (18), Bridget (17), Maggie (13), Rose (3) and Kate (2) and 3 sons John (15), Patrick (12) and James (5 months). James was a farmer and his 2 eldest daughters listed their occupation as farmer’s daughters, while John, Maggie and Patrick were scholars. James could not read but his wife and 4 eldest children could read and write. James spoke both Irish and English and no language is listed for the rest of the family. The Dillion family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls were constructed of permanent material while the roof was made of perishable material. James owned the land his house was on along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Michael Neary (74) was a widower who lived with his 3 unmarried children Pat (35), Michael (22) and Bridget (21). Michael was a farmer and his 2 sons recorded their occupation as farmer’s sons and Bridget listed her occupation as a farmer’s daughter. Michael could not read but spoke Irish and English along with Pat. All his children could read and write. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The roof was made of perishable material, but the walls were permanent material. Michael owned the land along with 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Bridget Mulligan (44) was a widowed farmer and lived with her 9 children. Bridget had 3 sons, John (23), Mark (20) and Thomas (11) and 6 daughters Mary (22), Bridget (19), Maggie (17), Hannah (16), Winnie (14) and Kate (7). John and Mark stated their occupation to be farmer’s sons and Mary, Bridget, Maggie and Hannah gave their occupation as farmer’s daughters. The 3 youngest children were scholars. All members of the household could read and write. Bridget and her 2 eldest children could speak Irish and English. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls were made using permanent material while the roof was made of perishable material. Bridget owned the land along with 1 stable, 1 coach house, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Mary Keone (60) lived with her unmarried son James (26). Mary was a widowed farmer and her son recorded his occupation as farmer’s son. Mary could not read but both members of the family spoke English and Irish. James could read and write. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 3 front windows and the house had 3 rooms. Both the walls and roof were made of perishable material. Mary owned the land her house was on as well as 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Pat Rhatigan (78) was a widower who lived with his 2 unmarried children, Pat (30) and Celia (29). Pat was a farmer and his children listed their occupation as farmer’s son and farmer’s daughter respectively. Pat could not read but both of his children could read and write. All members of the household spoke Irish and English. The Rhatigans lived in a 3rd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls and roof of the house were made of perishable material. Pat owned the land his house situated on along with 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

Margaret Neary (60) was a widowed farmer who lived with her 2 unmarried children James (30) and Maggie (21). Her children stated their occupation as farmer’s son and farmer’s daughter. All members of the family could read and write. Margaret spoke Irish and English, while no language was documented for her children. Their house was a 2nd class house with 3 rooms and 3 front windows. The walls of the house were constructed of permanent material while the roof was perishable. Margaret owned the land along with 1 stable, 1 coach house, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Ellen Neary (65) lived with her daughter-in-law Bridget (26) and her 3 grandchildren Hugh (3), John (2) and Ellen (3 months). Ellen was a widowed farmer, while her daughter-in-law was married at the time of the census. No occupation was documented for Bridget. Both Ellen and Bridget could read and write, while naturally none of the children could read. No language was recorded for any member of the family. The family lived in a 2nd class house, the house had 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls were permanent while the roof was made using perishable material. The land was owned by Ellen along with 1 stable, 1 coach house, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Bryan Leech (50) lived with his wife Winifred (43), their 4 sons, Patrick (22), Michael (14), John (10) and Thomas (6) and their 5 daughters Mary (20), Bridget (12) Eliza (8), Winifred (4) and Ellen (2). Bryan was a farmer and no occupation was listed for his wife. Patrick recorded his occupation as farmer’s son, while Mary’s occupation was stated as farmer’s daughter. The remaining children were scholars, except for the youngest 2, who were too young to attend school at the time of the census. Bryan and his wife could not read but their 7 eldest children could read and write. Bryan, Winifred and their oldest son spoke Irish and English, while no language was documented for the remaining family members. The family lived in a 3rd class house that had 2 front windows and 2 rooms. Both the walls and roof of the house were made of perishable material.

James McDermott (35) lived with his wife Sarah (34), their 3 children Bridget (4), Mary (3) and James (4 months) as well as his widowed mother Margaret (62). James was a farmer and no occupation was listed for the rest of his family. James, his wife and his mother could read and write, while naturally the children could not read. James spoke Irish and English. No language was recorded for the other family members. The family house was a 3rd class residence with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The house walls and roof were made of perishable material. James owned the land and had 2 farm steadings.

James Lohan (68) was a widower who lived with his 2 daughters, Mary (23) and Bridget (17). James was a farmer and his daughters recorded their occupation as farmer’s daughters. James could not read; however, both of his children could read and write. James spoke Irish and English, while no language has been recorded for his daughters. The Lohan family lived in a 3rd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. Perishable material was used to construct the walls and roof of the house. James owned the land as well as 2 farm steadings.

Michael Waldron (60) was a widower who lived with his unmarried son Patrick (25). Michael was a farmer and his son listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. Neither Michael or Patrick could read but Michael could speak Irish and English. No language was listed for his son Patrick. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls and the roof of the house were made of perishable material. Michael owned the land as well as 2 farm steadings.

Michael McDermott (65) was a widowed farmer who lived with his 2 unmarried sons and his daughter. James (26) and Michael (18) listed their occupation as farmer’s sons and his daughter Kate (21) was a farmer’s daughter. All members of the family could read and write, and Michael, James and Kate spoke Irish and English, however no language was recorded for the youngest son Michael. The McDermott family lived in a 3rd class house that had 2 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls and the roof were constructed using perishable material. Michael owned the land his house was situated on along with 4 farm steadings.

Thomas Shallow (50) was a married shopkeeper, who lived with his wife Mary (45) and 8 children. The couple had 4 daughters Bridget (23), Maggie (17), Winnie (15) and Annie (9) and 4 sons Michael (21), Patrick (19), Thomas (13) and James (11). The 4 eldest children listed an occupation of shopkeeper’s daughter and shopkeeper’s son respectively. The 4 youngest children were scholars. Thomas could not read but the rest of his family could read and write. Thomas and his wife Mary spoke Irish and English. No language is recorded for their children. The family house was a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 4 rooms. The house walls and roof were made using permanent material. Thomas owned the land along with 6 out-offices.

Pat Kilheeney (50) lived with his wife Mary (50), their 4 sons Michael (19), Patrick (15), Edward (12) and Martin (10) and 2 daughters Margaret (17) and Kate (8). Pat worked as a farmer and his wife did not list an occupation. Michael and Margaret documented their occupation as farmer’s son and farmer’s daughter. The 4 youngest children were scholars. Pat could not read but he spoke Irish and English. All other members of the family could read and write. Mary also spoke Irish and English, but no language is recorded for their children. The family house was documented as 2nd class and had 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material while the roof was perishable material. Pat owned the land as well as 3 farm steadings.

Lizzie Coyne (50) was a widow and listed her occupation as a farmer. Lizzie lived with her unmarried children; sons Michael (21), John (15) and her daughters Maggie (19) and Winnie (17). Michael gave his occupation as farmer’s son and both Maggie and Winnie listed their occupation as farmer’s daughters. John was a scholar. All members of the family could read and write, while Lizzie spoke both Irish and English. The Coyne family occupied a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and 2 rooms. Both the walls and roof were made of perishable material. Lizzie owned the land along with 1 farm steading.

Mary Kilcommon (50) was a widow and listed her occupation as a farmer. Mary lived with her 3 unmarried sons Daniel (25), Michael (22) and Peter (17) and her brother-in-law Pat Coyne (70). Both Daniel and Michael listed their surname as Coyne, while Peter used the surname Kilcommons. Each of her sons recorded their occupation as farmer’s son and Pat was a retired farmer. All members of the family, except Pat, could read and write. Mary and her brother-in-law could speak Irish and English. No language is listed for Mary’s sons. The Kilcommon family resided in a 3rd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The house walls and roof were made of perishable material. Mary owned the land, her house along with 3 farm steadings.

Hugh Neary (52) was a single man who worked as a boot and shoemaker. Hugh lived with his unmarried sister Celia (38). Celia did not record an occupation. Hugh and Celia could read and write, and both spoke Irish and English. The siblings lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and 4 rooms. Perishable material was used to construct the walls and the roof. Hugh owned the land, his house as well as 1 out-office.

John Mahon (42) worked as an agricultural labourer and lived with his wife Mary Anne (41) and an unmarried boarder Pat Shallow (50). Mary Anne gave her occupation as a seamstress and Pat worked as a tailor. John could not read, while Mary Anne and Pat could read and write. All members of the household spoke Irish and English. The Mahon family lived in a 4th class dwelling with just 1 front window and 1 room. The walls and the roof of the house were made of perishable material. John Hurley owned the land as well as 1 out-office.

Michael Neary (45) was a married farmer who lived with his wife Lizzie (20) and unmarried sister Mary (32). Lizzie did not list an occupation and Mary recorded her occupation as farmer’s sister. Only Lizzie could read and write. Michael spoke both Irish and English, while no language was listed for his wife or sister. The Neary family resided in a 3rd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. Both the walls and roof were made of perishable material. Michael owned the land his house was situated on along with 3 farm steadings.

Bridget Redington (75) was an unmarried woman who lived alone. She listed her occupation as a cattier. While she could not read, she spoke both Irish and English. Bridget lived in a 4th class house with just 1 front window and 1 room. The house walls and roof were constructed using perishable material. John Hurley owned the land.

Michael Neary (52) lived with his wife Matilda Jane (27) and 3 servants Patrick Conneally (14) listed his occupation as a farm servant, Margaret Hayden (21) worked as a domestic cook servant and Mary Keavney (25) was a general domestic servant. Michael was a farmer and his wife did not give an occupation. All members of the household could read and write, except Margaret. Each person in the household spoke English only. The Neary family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 5 rooms. Both the walls and roof were made using permanent material. Michael owned the land his house is situated along with 17 farm steadings.

Thomas Kilcommon (59) was a married farmer who lived with his wife Mary (63) and their 2 unmarried children Kate (22) and Peter (21). Mary did not list an occupation; Kate recorded her occupation as farmer’s daughter and Peter was a farmer’s son. Thomas and his children could read and write, while Thomas and his wife spoke Irish and English. Mary could not read. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and 3 room. Perishable material was used for the walls and the roof of the house. Thomas owned the land, his house as well as 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 barn.

Martin Neary (50) lived with his wife Catherine (46) and their 5 unmarried children, Lizzie (18), Sarah (15), Martin (12), Maggie (10) and Peter (8). Martin was a farmer and Lizzie listed her occupation as farmer’s daughter while the rest of the children were scholars. All members of the Neary family could read and write while Martin and his wife spoke both Irish and English. The family lived in a 3rd class house that had 3 front windows and 2 rooms. Perishable material was used for the walls and roof of the house. Martin owned the land his house was situated on along with 1 stable and 1 cow house.

Census 1911

There was a total of 27 houses in Aghalateeve in 1911. The total population was 144 people, 76 were male and 68 were female. All residents were born in County Galway, except for Mary Neary’s household and Thomas Shallow’s granddaughter Annie, who born in America. All occupants were Roman Catholic. The census from, collected on the 5th of April showed all the houses were private dwellings. There were 19 stables, 2 coach houses, 26 cow houses, 13 calf houses, 1 dairy, 23 piggeries 8 fowl houses, 22 barns, 3 sheds and 1 store.

Stephen Burke (72) was a widower and lived with his son Hubert (34) and his daughter-in-law Winifred (22). Stephen listed his occupation as herd while Hubert and Winifred did not record an occupation. Stephen and his son could not read but they both spoke Irish and English. Winifred could read and write but did not record a language, suggesting she spoke English only. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 2 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls and roof were made of permanent material. Mary Neary owned the land along with 1 stable.

Pat J Neary (50) was a married farmer who lived with his wife Mart (40) and their 7 children unmarried children, Patrick (20), John (18), Thomas (13), Celia (11), James (9), Bridget (7) and Joseph (1). At the time of the census Pat and Mary had been married 23 years and had 10 children, 9 of whom were still living. Patrick, John and Thomas gave their occupation as farmer’s son, while Celia listed her occupation as farmer’s daughter. James and Bridget were scholars. All members of the family could read and write except for Joseph who naturally could not read. Pat, John, Thomas, Celia and James spoke Irish and English.

The family lived in a 2nd class house that had 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls were made of permanent material while the roof was perishable material. Pat owned the land along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Thomas Mulligan (41) worked as a steward and house trainer. He lived with his wife Mary (35) and their 5 children, John (13), Michael (12), Mary (8), Thomas (6) and Mark (4). In 1911, Thomas and Mary were married for 15 years and had 6 children, all were still living. All the children were scholars and all members of the family could read and write, except for Mark, who was too young at the time of the census. The 2 eldest children spoke Irish and English. The family occupied a 2nd class dwelling with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls and the roof. Thomas owned the land his house was situated on along with 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery and 1 fowl house.

Thomas Pettit (45) lived with his wife of 8 years Bridget (52) and their only child Peter (6). Thomas was a farmer and Peter was a scholar. Thomas could read and write, while Peter could read only. Bridget could not read. No language is listed for any member of the family, suggesting they spoke English only. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls were permanent material while the roof was made of perishable material. Thomas owned the land along with 1 cow house, 1 calf house and 1 barn.

Martin Neary (62) worked as a farmer and lived with his wife Catherine (60) and their 2 unmarried children, Peter (18) and Margaret (20). Martin and Catherine had been married for 34 years at the time of the census and had 7 children, 5 of whom were still living. Peter documented his occupation as farmer’s son. All members of the family could read and write. Martin and Catherine spoke Irish and English, while no language was recorded for their children. The Neary family occupied a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material while the roof was made of perishable material. Martin owned the land his house was situated on along with 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Elizabeth Neary (29) was a widow who lived with her 2 children, Martin (7) and Margaret (6) and her unmarried sister-in-law Mary (54). Elizabeth worked as a farmer, while no occupation was given for the other family members. Elizabeth and Martin could read and write, while Margaret could read only. Mary could not read or write but she spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 2nd class house that had 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material while the roof was perishable. Elizabeth owned the land her house was situated on along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Mary Neary (30) was a County Roscommon farmer who lived with her 2 sons Michael (3) and Joseph (2), both of whom were born in Dublin City and 2 servants Peter Byrne (27) and Elizabeth Lavery (65). Peter, from County Wicklow worked as a general ward servant and Elizabeth, from Kilkenny was a domestic servant. Both Mary and Elizabeth were widows, while Peter was unmarried. All members of the household could read and write, except the children, who naturally were too young at the time of the census. No language is listed for any member of the household. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 5 rooms. Both the walls and roof of the house were made using permanent material. Mary owned the land her house was situated on along with 4 stables, 2 coach houses, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 dairy, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 shed.

Thomas Kilcommins (69) lived with his wife Mary (74), their married son Peter (33), daughter-in-law Lizzie (33) and 2 grandchildren Mary (3) and Thomas (1). Thomas and Mary were married 44 years at the time of the census and had 5 children, all of whom were still living. Peter and Lizzie were married for 4 years and had 2 children. Thomas was a farmer and Peter listed his occupation as farmer’s son. Thomas could read only, while his wife could not read, but they both spoke Irish and English. Peter and Lizzie could read and write, while naturally the children were too young to read. The family occupied a 3rd class house with 1 front window and 3 rooms. The walls were constructed using permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. Thomas owned the land along with 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Hugh Neary (66) was an unmarried farmer. He lived with his unmarried sister Celia (33) who was also a farmer. Both Hugh and Celia could read and write, and they spoke Irish and English. The siblings occupied a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, but the roof was perishable material. Hugh owned the land his house was situated on along with 1 cow house and 1 barn.

James Dillion (53) lived with his wife Margaret (52) and their 8 children, Margaret (19), Michael Patrick (17), Rose Teresa (13), Kate (11), James (9), Thomas (5), Martin (4) and Joseph (4). James and Margaret were married for 29 years in 1911. They had 10 children, all of whom were still living. James worked as a farmer and Margaret and Michael Patrick listed their occupation as farmer’s daughter and farmer’s son respectively. Rose Teresa, Kate, James and Thomas were scholars. All members of the Dillion family could read and write, except the youngest 2 children, who were too young at the time of the census. No language is listed for any family member, suggesting they could speak English only. The Dillion family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls while perishable material was used for the roof. James owned the land his house was situated on along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Michael Neary (84) was a widower who lived with his 2 unmarried children Pat (40) and Bridget (30). Michael was a farmer and Pat listed his occupation as farmer’s son and Bridget recorded farmer’s daughter as her occupation. Michael could read only, but he spoke Irish and English. Pat and Bridget could read and write. The family lived in a 2nd class house that had 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The roof was made of perishable material, but the walls were permanent material. Michael owned the land his house was situated on along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Bridget Mulligan (57) lived with her daughter Kate (19), married son John (37), daughter-in-law Hannah (28) and grandson Michael Coyne (7). Bridget was a widow, who had been married for 38 years. She had 9 children, all of whom were still living at the time of the census. John and Hannah had been married for less than a year. Bridget worked as a farmer, no occupation was given for other family members, except Michael who was a scholar. Everybody in the household could read and write. Bridget and her son spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. Bridget owned the land her house was situated on along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Mary Keane (73) was a widowed farmer who lived with her married son James (42), daughter-in-law Catherine (40) and her 2 grandchildren Martin (2) and Mary (1). At the time of the census, James and Catherine had been married for 3 years and had 2 children. James described his occupation as farmer’s son. Mary could not read, but both herself and her son spoke Irish and English. James and Catherine could read and write. The Keane family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls were made of permanent material while the roof was perishable material. Mary owned the land her house was situated on along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 calf house 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Pat Rattigan (39) lived with his wife Mary (35) and their 6 children, James (9), Lizzie (8), Michael (6), Katie (4), Patrick (3) and Mary (2 months). Pat and Mary had been married for 10 years and had 6 children at the time of the census. Pat worked as a farmer and James and Lizzie were scholars. All members of the family could read and write, except the youngest 4 children. No language is recorded for any member of the family, suggesting they spoke English only. The Rattigan family occupied a 2nd class house. The house had 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. Pat owned the land his house was situated on along with 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Margaret Neary (73) was a widow and lived with her unmarried son James (42) and her granddaughter Katie Quinn (10). Margaret was a farmer and her son listed his occupation as a farmer’s son. Katie was a scholar. All members of the household could read and write. No language was recorded for the family. The house occupied by the Neary family was 2nd class, with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was constructed using perishable material. Margaret owned the land her house was situated on along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 barn and 1 shed.

Pat Neary (Hugh) (52) was a farmer who lived with his wife Bridget (37) and their 3 sons, Hugh (13), John (11) and Charles (7) and their 5 daughters, Ellen (10), Annie (9), Bridget (5), Mary (4) and Celia (2). Pat and Bridget had been married for 14 years at the time of the census and had 8 children. All their children were scholars, except Celia, who naturally was too young at the time. All members of the family could read and write, with the exception of the youngest 2 children. Everybody in the Neary family spoke English only.

The family occupied a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. Pat Neary owned the land his house was situated on along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 shed.

Winifred Leech (56) was a widowed farmer who lived with her 2 sons, John (20) and Thomas (16) and her 3 daughters, Lizzie (18), Winifred (14) and Ellen (11). John and Thomas gave their occupation as farmer’s son, while Lizzie and Winifred recorded their occupation as farmer’s daughter. Ellen was a scholar. Winifred could read only but she spoke Irish and English. All her children could read and write. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material while the roof was made of perishable material. Winifred owned the land her house was situated on, along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

James McDermott (47) lived with his wife Sarah (48) and their 3 daughters, Brigid (19), Mary (13) and Margaret (8) and their 2 sons, James (10) and Michael (5). At the time of the census, James and Sarah had been married for 16 years and had 5 children, all of whom were living. James was a farmer and all his children were scholars. James and his 4 eldest children could read and write, while the youngest child, Michael, could read only. Sarah could not read. No language was recorded for any member of the family, suggesting they spoke English only. The McDermott family occupied a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. James owned the land his house was situated on as well as 1 cow house and 1 barn.

James Lohan (68) was a widower who lived with his daughter Mary Conway (32) and his son-in-law John Conway (32). Mary and John had been married for 1 year at the time of the census. James and John were both farmers. James could not read, but his daughter and her husband could read and write. No language was listed for any member of the family. The house occupied by the family was 2nd class with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. James owned the land his house was situated on, along with 1 cow house, 1 calf house and 1 piggery.

Elizabeth Coyne (71) was a widow and lived with her son Michael (36), her daughter-in-law Bridget (29) and her granddaughter Lizzie (4). At the time of the census, Michael and Bridget had been married for 8 years and had 2 children, both of whom were living. Elizabeth and her son were farmers. Elizabeth could not read, but her son and daughter-in-law could read and write. The Coyne family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. Permanent material was used for the walls of the house, while the roof was made of perishable material. Elizabeth owned the land her house was situated on, along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Dan Coyne (35) lived with his 2 unmarried siblings, Bridget (36) and Michael (32). Dan worked as a farmer and his brother was a labourer. All members of the family could read and write. No language was recorded for the siblings. They occupied a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. Dan owned the land along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Pat Kilheeney (65) was a farmer who lived with his wife Mary (65) and their 4 unmarried children, Kate (19), Edward (23) and Patrick (26) and Michael (27). Pat and Mary had been married for 37 years at the time of the census and had 9 children, 8 of whom were still living. Kate listed her occupation as farmer’s daughter, while Edward, Patrick and Michael listed their occupation as farmer’s son. While Pat and his wife could read only, their children could read and write. The Kilheeney family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made using permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. Pat owned the land his house was located on as well as 1 cow house and 1 barn.

Michael Waldron (74) was a widower who lived with his married son Patrick (37), his daughter-in-law Mary (35) and his 3 grandchildren, Mary (6), Bridget (3) and John (1). In 1911, Patrick and Mary had been married for 8 years and had 5 children, all of whom were living. Michael and his son were farmers and his eldest grandchild, Mary, was a scholar. Michael and Patrick could not read, but Mary and her daughter could read and write. Naturally, Bridget and John could not read at the time of the census. The family lived in 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls, while the roof was made using perishable material. Michael owned the land his house was located on, along with 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

Thomas Shallow (65) lived with his wife Mary (55), their 2 unmarried sons, Michael (30) and Patrick J. (28), their 3 unmarried daughters, Maggie (26), Winifred M. (24) and Annie (18) and their granddaughter Mary (6), who was born in America. Thomas and Mary had been married for 36 years and had 10 children, 9 of whom were living in 1911. Thomas and his 2 sons were shopkeepers, while Annie was a scholar. All members of the family could read and write, apart from Thomas who could not read. Thomas and his wife spoke Irish and English. The Shallow family occupied a 2nd class house that had 5 front windows and 5 rooms. The walls of the house were made using permanent material, while the roof was made using perishable material. Thomas owned the land his house was situated on as well as 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 store.

Michael McDermott (76) was a widower who had been married for 25 years and had 10 children, 9 of whom were living during the time of the census. Michael lived with his married son Thomas (40) and single son Michael (30), daughter-in-law Mary (35) and 2 grandsons Patk (2) and Michael (1). Thomas and Mary were married for 3 years in 1911 and had 2 children. Michael and his sons were farmers. All members of the family could read and write, except for Patk and Michael who were too young at the time. The McDermott family lived in a 2nd class house that had 3 front windows and 3 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls, while the roof was made of perishable material. Michael owned the land his house was located on along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

John Hurley (68) was unmarried and lived with his widowed sister Margaret Neary (56) and unmarried nephew James Neary (32). John was a farmer and his nephew listed his occupation as helper on farm. All members of the household could read and write. No language is listed, suggesting the family spoke English only. The family lived in a 2nd class house that had 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made using permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. John owned the land his house was located on as well as 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

John Connealy (73) lived with his wife Hanoria (57) and their 3 single children Patrick (21), Mary (22) and Thomas (10). At the time of the census, John and Hanoria had been married for 37 years and had 14 children, 11 of whom were living. John and his son Patrick were farmers, while Thomas was a scholar. John could read only, and his wife could not read, but they spoke Irish and English. Their children could read and write. The Connealy family lived in a 2nd class house that had 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The house walls were made using permanent material and the roof was made of perishable material. John owned the land on which is house was situated along with 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This page was added on 20/04/2020.

No Comments

Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this page!

Add a comment about this page

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *