Boleythomas

Buaile Thomáis

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Boleythomas

Civil Parish of Kilbegnet

Buaile Thomáis, Thomas’s Booley or Dairy

Boleythomas is situated in the civil parish of Kilbegnet, in the Barony of Ballymoe, County Galway. The townland if found at the Southern boundary of the parish, joining the parish of Killian, Barony of Killian, County Galway.

The Down Survey Map (post Cromwell) showed Boleythomas, under the name Gravagh was owned by John Bourke (Catholic) and Sir Maurice Hurley (Protestant). The survey has no available information on the specifics of the land.

O’ Donovan’s Field Name Books describes Boleythomas as having no remarkable feature. While there are portions of bog at the Southern boundary, the rest of the land is tillage and pasture.

Census 1841-1851

The townland of Boleythomas in 1851 consisted of an area of 238 acres, 2 roods and 4 perches. The 1841 census showed there were 77 males and 71 females, making up a total population of 108 people. By 1851, the population had decreased to 116 people, 53 males and 63 females. There was a total of 22 houses in both 1841 and 1851, all of which were inhabited. The poor law valuation paid was £45-5-0.

 1851 Old Age Pension Search Forms

While the surname Quirke is shown to have applied for the old age pension, there is no further information can currently be found as of 5th February 2020.

Griffith’s Valuation 1847-1864

According to Griffith’s Valuation, Boleythomas was owned by Allen Pollock. Allen leased the land to Martin Loughan, Thomas Grady, Patrick Keane, Thomas Eglinton (Sen.), Thomas Eglinton (Jun.), Lake Cuddy, Patrick Mannion, Luke Keavany, Matthew Feeny, Thomas Dowd, Michael Quirke, Thomas Keavany, Patrick Keavany, James Feeny and Patrick Feeny in a joint lease, Bridget Feeny and Peter Feeny in a joint lease and Patrick Keavany and Peter Keavany in a joint lease. Allen kept an area of bog in fee measuring 20 acres, 3 roods and 20 perches.

Martin Loughan leased a house and land measuring 4 acres, 1 rood and 38 perches for £1-35-0. Thomas Grady paid £3-5-0 per annum for land measuring 2 acres, 2 roods and 1 perch, as well as house, office and land. Patrick Keane leased 1 acre, 0 roods and 25 perches of land and house, office and land measuring 13 acres, 3 roods and 17 perches for a total of £5-5-0. Thomas Eglinton (Sen.) leased a house and land measuring 7 acres, 3 roods and 20 perches for £3-5-0. Thomas Eglinton (Jun.) paid £2-10-0 for house, office and land measuring 5 acres, 1 rood and 25 perches. Lake Cuddy rented land measuring 4 acres, 2 roods and 20 perches and house, office and land measuring 5 acres, 0 roods and 31 perches. Lake paid a total of £3-15-0. Patrick Mannion leased house, office and land measuring 21 acres, 3 roods and 38 perches for £7. Luke Keavany paid £3-15-0 for house, office and land on 10 acres, 0 roods and 5 perches. Matthew Feeny rented house, office and land measuring 9 acres, 3 roods and 27 perches paying £3-15-0 per year. Thomas Dowd paid £4-10-0 for house, office and land on 10 acres, 1 rood and 5 perches. Michael Quirke rented 9 acres, 2 roods and 18 perches of house, office and land for £3-5-0. Thomas Keavany paid a total of £3 for a house and land measuring of 7 acres, 2 roods and 37 perches. Patrick Keavany rented a house, office and land measuring 13 acres, 1 rood and 20 perches for £5 annually.  James and Patrick Feeny jointly rented 2 houses, offices and land measuring 30 acres, 0 roods and 34 perches paying £3-5-0 each. Bridget and Peter Feeny rented 2 houses on 24 acres, 2 roods and 32 perches of land and each paid £3-15-0. Patrick and Peter Keavany each paid £2-5-0 for 24 acres, 1 rood and 26 perches of land and 2 houses.                                                                                                                          The Total Annual Valuation of Rateable Property in Boleythomas was £69.

Census 1901

There a total of 17 houses in Boleythomas in 1901, 16 of which were occupied. There was a population of 87 people, 39 of which were male and 48 were female. The heads of the households were as follows: Lawrence Keaveney, Lawrence Keaveny, Margaret Keaveny, Michael Quirke, John Clarke, Matt Feeney, Peter Keaveny, Luke Mannion, Pat Keane, Pat Eaglington, Bridget Keane, Bridget O’Gready, Catherine Feeney, John Keane and Bridget Feeny. All residents were Roman Catholic, and each were from County Galway, except members of Catherine Feeney’s family who did not list a county and instead recorded Ballythorn and Camderry as places of birth.  All houses were listed as private dwellings. Matt Feeney owned the land on which the vacant house was situated. The census forms were collected on April 4th, 1901. There were 32 farm steadings comprising 7 stables, 14 cow houses, 8 piggeries and 3 barns. There was another farm steading but as a result of a missing B2 return form, the nature of the building is unclear.

Lawrence Keaveney (41) lived with his wife Bridget (36), their 2 sons, Edward (6) and James (5) and his widowed mother, Kate (69). Lawrence was a farmer, and Edward and James had their occupation listed as farmer’s son. No member of the family could read or write; however, Lawrence, Bridget and Kate spoke Irish and English. The family occupied a 3rd class dwelling with 2 front windows and 2 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. Lawrence owned the land on which his owned was situated as well as 1 stable and 1 piggery.

Lawrence Keaveny (42) was a married farmer. He lived with his wife Mary (35), their 4 daughters, Bridget (13), Anne (11), Mary (10) and Margaret (7) and son Patrick (3). Bridget and Anne had their occupation recorded as farmer’s daughters, while both Mary and Margaret were scholars. Only the 3 eldest children could read and write, however, Lawrence, his wife as well as the 3 eldest children spoke Irish and English.

The Keaveny family lived in a 3rd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. Perishable material was used to construct the walls and the roof of the house. Lawrence owned the land his house was situated on along with 1 cow house.

Margaret Keaveny (60) was widowed farmer who lived with her unmarried son, John (35). John recorded his occupation as farmer’s son. Margaret could not read but she spoke Irish and English. John could read and write; he also spoke both Irish and English. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was made using perishable material. Margaret owned the land on which her house was located along with 1 cow house and 1 barn.

Michael Quirke (45) lived with his wife Catherine (43), their 5 children, Pat (15), Nel (12), Ellen (8), Mary (8) and John (5), his father Mi (81), mother Mary (79) and unmarried brother Pa (39). Michael was a farmer, while father Mi was a retired farmer and Pa was an agricultural labourer. The eldest child, Pat was a farmer’s son, while the other children were scholars. All members of the family could read and write, except Michael’s parents and youngest child John, who could read only at the time of the census. Irish and English was spoken by every member of the Quirke family.

The family occupied a 2nd class dwelling with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was constructed using perishable material. Michael owned the land his house was situated on along with 1 stable and 1 cow house.

John Clarke (60) and his wife Margaret (52) lived with their 3 unmarried sons, Patrick (15), John (13) and Martin (11). John was a farmer and Margaret recorded her occupation as farmer’s wife. All the children had their occupation recorded as farmer’s son. John and the 2 eldest children could read and write, while Margaret and Martin could not read. John and his wife spoke Irish and English, while their children spoke English only.

The Clarke family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and 2 rooms. Both the walls and the roof of the house were made using perishable material. John owned the land his house was situated on along with 1 piggery.

Matt Feeney (61) lived with his wife Mary (62), their 2 unmarried children Matt (35) and Sarah (18) and granddaughter Lily Davis (3). Matt was a farmer, while Mary listed her occupation as farmer’s wife. Matt was a farmer’s son; Sarah was a farmer’s daughter and Lily had her occupation recorded as farmer’s granddaughter. Matt and Sarah could read and write, while the other 3 family members could not read or write. All members of the family spoke Irish and English.

The family occupied a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was made using perishable material. Matt owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable and 1 cow house.

Peter Keaveny (60) was a married farmer. He lived with his wife Mary (58) and their 3 unmarried children, Kate (30), Luke (26) and Peter (17). Mary and Kate both listed their occupation as housekeeper. Luke was also a farmer, while Peter was a scholar. All members of the family could read and write, except Mary who could read only. Each person in the Keaveny family spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls of the house, while the roof was made using perishable material. Peter owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Luke Mannion (52) lived with wife Kate Ward (50), their 4 daughters, Bridget (16), Mary (15), Kate (13) and Norah (6) and their son Michl [sic] (12). Luke worked as a farmer, and each of his daughters had their occupation recorded as farmer’s daughter. Michl was a scholar. While all their children could read and write, Luke and his wife could not read. All members of the family spoke Irish and English.

The Mannion family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was constructed using perishable material. Luke owned the land on which his house was located along with 1 stable and 1 cow house.

Pat Keane (49) and his wife Catherine (45) lived with their 3 sons, Pat (17), John (15) and Thomas (6) and their 5 daughters, Bridget (16), Ellen (13), Rose (11), Kate (8) and Margaret (3). Pat was a farmer, while his 2 eldest sons had their occupation listed as farmer’s son. Bridget and Margaret were recorded as farmer’s daughters. Ellen, Rose, Kate and Thomas were scholars. Pat and his 6 eldest children could read and write. Catherine could not read but she spoke Irish and English. The 2 youngest children Thomas and Margaret could not read at the time of the census. All members of the family spoke Irish and English, apart from Margaret who spoke English only.

The family lived in a 3rd class house that had 2 windows in the front and 3 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls, while the roof was made using perishable material. Pat owned the land his house was located on along with 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

Pat Eaglington (22) lived with his wife Winifred (29) and his widowed mother Kate (60). Pat worked a farmer. Pat was the only one able to read and write, yet every member of the family spoke Irish and English. The family occupied a 2nd class dwelling with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof of the house was constructed of perishable material. Pat owned the land on which his house was situated along with 2 cow houses and 1 barn.

Bridget Keane (50) lived with her daughter Bridget (19) and son Pat (12). Bridget was a married farmer, while her daughter listed her occupation as farmer’s daughter and Pat was listed as a farmer’s son. Only Bridget (jun.) could read and write, however, every member of the family spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 2 front windows and 2 rooms. Both the walls and the roof of the house were made of permanent material. Bridget owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

Bridget O’Gready (63) was a widowed farmer. She lived with her married son Edward (42), daughter-in-law Margaret (41), her 4 granddaughters Mary (15), Bridget (9), Margaret (6) and Ellen (4) and her 2 grandsons Patrick (13) and Thomas (11). Edward was also a farmer, while his wife was a housekeeper. The 4 eldest children were scholars, while Margaret and Ellen were listed as farmer’s daughters. Bridget and her 2 youngest grandchildren could not read, but the other family members could read and write. All members of the family spoke Irish and English.

The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. Bridget owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

Catherine Feeney (60) was widow who lived with her married son Thomas (25) and wife Maggie (20). Thomas was a farmer. Thomas listed his place of birth as Ballythorn and Maggie listed her birthplace as Camderry. While Catherine could not read or write, she spoke both Irish and English. Thomas and Maggie could read and write, as well as speak Irish and English. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. While the walls were made of permanent material, the roof of the house were made of perishable material. Catherine owned the land on which her house was situated along with 2 cow houses and 1 piggery.

John Keane (58) lived with his wife Bridget (53), their 4 unmarried sons, Pat (19), Mat (16), John (12) and Michael (5) and daughter Margaret (14). John was a farmer and each of his sons had their occupation listed as farmer’s son. Bridget was a farmer’s wife and Margaret was listed as a farmer’s daughter. While John could not read or write, he spoke Irish and English. All the other family members could read and write, as well as speak Irish and English.

The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. John owned the land his house was located on along with 1 stable, 1 cow house and a piggery.

Bridget Feeny (40) was a married farmer. She lived with her son Pat (18) and her 4 daughters, Mary (14), Bridget (12), Maggie (11) and Katie (9). Mary was listed as farmer’s daughter, while Bridget, Maggie and Katie were scholars. Bridget and her son could not read or write, but her daughters could read and write. All members of the family spoke Irish and English.

The Feeny family occupied a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. Bridget owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 farm steading.

1911 Census

There was a total of 15 households in Boleythomas in 1911. The population was a total of 72 people, 36 were male and 36 were female. The heads of the households were as follows: John Feeney, Lawrence Keavney, John Keavney, Thomas Quirke, John Clarke, Matthew Feeney, Bridget Keane, Thomas Feeney, Luke Mannion, James Keane, Patrick Keane, Edmond Grady, Patrick Eglington, Patrick Keane and Lawrence Keaveny. All residents were Roman Catholic, and all were from County Galway. All the houses were listed as private dwellings. The census forms were collected on the 10th of April and show there was a total of 46 farm steadings, 5 stables, 13 cow houses, 1 calf house, 6 piggeries, 1 fowl house, 8 barns and 12 sheds.

John Feeney (60) was a married farmer. He lived with his wife Bridget (58) and their unmarried children, Patrick (25) and Katie (20). At the time of the census, John and Bridget had been married for 30 years and had 5 children, all of whom were living in 1911. Patrick worked a farm labourer. Neither John or his wife could read or write, but both of their children could read and write. Each member of the family spoke Irish and English.

The Feeney family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 2 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. John owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Lawrence Keavney (63) lived with his wife Bridget (48), their 3 unmarried sons, Patrick (16), James (14) and Edward (12) and his widowed mother Catherine (84). Lawrence and Bridget had been married for 17 years and had 5 children, 3 of whom were living at the time of the census. Catherine was married 65 years before being widowed. She had 5 children, 4 of whom were living in 1911. Lawrence was a farmer, while his eldest son Patrick was a farm labourer. James and Edward were scholars. Lawrence, Bridget and Catherine could not read or write, but they each spoke Irish and English. Patrick, James and Edward could read and write, but they spoke English only.

The Keavney family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and 2 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls of the house while the roof was made of perishable material. Lawrence owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house and 1 shed.

John Keavney (43) was a single farmer who lived alone. John could read and write, as well as speak both Irish and English. John lived in a 3rd class house that had 2 front windows and just 1 room. Perishable material was used to construct both the walls and the roof of the house. John owned the land his house was situated on along with 1 barn.

Thomas Quirke (55) lived with his wife Catherine (54), their 2 unmarried sons, Edward (22) and John (15) and daughter Mary (18). Thomas and Catherine had been married for 26 years in 1911 and had 6 children, 5 of whom were still living. Thomas was a farmer and both his sons worked as labourers. Each member of the Quirke family could read and write. Irish and English was spoken by every member of the family. The Quirke family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 2 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the perishable material was used to construct the roof. Thomas Oats [sic] owned the land along with 1 cow house, 1 barn and 1 shed.

John Clarke (75) lived with his wife Margaret (68) and their 2 unmarried sons, Jack (25) and Martin (22). John and Margaret had been married for 42 years and had 9 children, 9 of whom were living in 1911. John was a farmer, and both Jack and Martin worked as labourers. John and eldest son Jack could read and write, while Margaret and Martin could not read. All members of the family spoke Irish and English. The Clarke family occupied a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and 2 rooms. Perishable material was used to construct both the walls and the roof of the house. John owned the land on which his house was located along with 1 cow house, 1 barn and 1 shed.

Matthew Feeney (48) and his wife of 3 years [sic] Mary (50) lived with their daughter Margaret (5) and son John Thomas (2) and married domestic servant Margaret Logan (86). Matthew was a farmer, while his daughter was a scholar. Matthew and Mary could read and write, while their children and Margaret Logan could not read or write. Matthew and Margaret Logan spoke Irish and English, while the other members of the household spoke English only. The Feeney family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and 2 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material while the roof was made of perishable material. Matthew owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 barn and 1 shed.

Bridget Keane (69) was widowed farmer who lived with her 2 unmarried sons Mathew (25) and Michael (21). Bridget had been married 43 years before being widowed. She had 11 children, 10 of whom were living in 1911. Mathew’s occupation was recorded as a farmer’s son, while Michael worked as a labourer. Each member of the family could read and write. All members of the Keane family spoke Irish and English. The Keane family occupied a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and 1 room. The walls were made of permanent material, while the roof was constructed using perishable material. Bridget owned the land on which her house was located along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 barn and 1 shed.

Thomas Feeney (40) lived with his wife Maggie (31), their daughters Katie (7) and Ellen (5), their son John (4) and his widowed mother Catherine (80). At the time of the census, Thomas and Maggie had been married for 10 years and had 5 children, 3 of whom were living in 1911. Thomas was a farmer and eldest daughter Katie was a scholar. Thomas and his wife could read and write, while their eldest daughter could read only. Ellen and John were too young to read and write at the time of the census. Catherine could not read or write, but she spoke Irish and English. Thomas and his wife also spoke both Irish and English.

The Feeney family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and 2 rooms. Perishable material was used to construct both the walls and the roof of the house. Thomas owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 barn and 1 shed.

Luke Mannion (65) was widower. He lived with his 2 unmarried children, Michael (21) and Hanoria (15). Luke was a farmer, while Michael worked as a labourer. While Luke could not read or write, he spoke Irish and English. Michael and Hanoria could read and write, as well as speak Irish and English. The Mannion family lived in a 3rd class house that had 2 front windows and 2 rooms. Permanent material was used for the walls of the house, while the roof was made of perishable material. Luke owned the land his house was situated on along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 barn and 1 shed.

James Keane (40) lived with his wife of 10 years Mary (32), their 2 sons Thomas (9) and Martin (8) and their 2 daughters Anne (2) and Mary (6 months). James and Mary had 4 children. James worked was a farmer, while the 3 eldest children were scholars. James, his wife, Thomas and Martin could read and write, while naturally Anne and Mary were too young to read or write at the time of the census. James and Mary spoke Irish and English. The Keane family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and 2 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. James owned the land on which his house was situated as well as 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 shed.

Patrick Keane (60) lived with his wife Catherine (55), their 3 sons, John (23), Thos (16) and Michael (9) and their 3 daughters, Rose (19), Kate (17) and Margaret (14). Patrick and Catherine had been married for 30 years and had 11 children, 10 of whom were living in 1911. Patrick was farmer, while eldest son John worked as a labourer. The 3 youngest children, Thos, Margaret and Michael were scholars. All members of the Keane family could read and write as well as speak Irish and English.

The Keane family occupied a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and 2 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls of the house, while perishable material was used for the roof. Patrick owned the land his house was situated on along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 shed.

Edmond Grady (49) and his wife Margaret (58) lived with their son Thomas (21) and their 2 daughters Maggie (17) and Ellen (15). Edmond and Margaret had been married for 29 years and had 6 children, all of whom were living at the time of the census. Edmond and Thomas both recorded their occupation as farmers. While Edmond could not read or write, he spoke Irish and English. Margaret and her children could read and write. Thomas also spoke Irish and English, while the other family members spoke English only.

The Grady family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and just 1 room. Perishable material was used to construct both the walls and the roof of the house. Edmond owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 piggery and 1 shed.

Patrick Eglington (32) lived with his wife of 10 years Winifred (40), their 5 children, Stephen (10), Bridget (9), Mary (7), Kate (5), Maggie (1) and his widowed mother Catherine (70). Catherine had been married for 49 years before being widowed. She had 8 children, 4 of whom were living in 1911. Patrick worked as a farmer and his 4 eldest children were scholars. All members of the family could read and write, except for Maggie who was too young at the time and Catherine. Patrick and his mother spoke Irish and English, while the other family members spoke English only.

The Eglington family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and 2 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. Patrick owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house and 1 shed.

Patrick Keane (20) was an unmarried farmer who lived with his single sister Mary (21). The siblings could read and write as well as speak Irish and English. The pair lived in a 2nd class house with 2 front windows and 2 rooms. Both the walls and the roof of the house were made of permanent material. Patrick owned the land on which his house was located along with 1 cow house and 1 shed.

Lawrence Keaveny (45) lived with his wife Mary (400 and their 4 children, Mary (19), Maggie (16), Patrick (12) and Michael (9). Lawrence and Mary had been married for 21 years and had 6 children, all of whom were living in 1911. Lawrence was a farmer and his 2 youngest children were scholars. All members of the Keaveny family could read and write. Patrick, his wife and their 2 eldest children spoke Irish and English.

The family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and 2 rooms. Perishable material was used to construct both the walls and the roof of the house. Lawrence owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

This page was added on 23/04/2020.

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