Creggs

Na Creaga

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Creggs
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Creggs

Civil Parish of Kilbegnet

Na Creaga, Rocks

Creggs is located in the civil parish of Kilbegnet, Barony of Ballymoe, County Galway. Located in the East of the parish, Creggs borders the parish of Fuerty, Barony of Athlone, County Roscommon.

The Down Survey Map (post Cromwell) shows that Creggs was called Creghduffe. The 1670s owners were John Bourke (Catholic) and Sir Maurice Hurley (Protestant). There were 40 plantation acres of unprofitable land and 280 acres of unprofitable land. 280 plantation acres were forfeited.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books describes the townland of Creggs as having 3 Danish forts. There is a town or village located in the South Eastern portion of the townland. According to O’Donovan’s Field Name Books, fairs were held in the town. In the North West end of the village, 3 roads meet in a junction. gs. In the North-Eastern corner, there is bog land, while the remaining land is tillage and pasture.

Census 18411-1851

Creggs consisted of an area of 244 acres, 3 roods and 23 perches. The total population in 1841 was 21 people, 13 were male and 8 were female. The 1851 population is not recorded on the census records.

Griffith’s Valuation 1847-1864

According to Griffith’s Valuation Allen Pollock owned the land and leased it to various tenants. Allen kept a cottier’s house and land measuring 56 acres, 3 roods and 19 perches, as well as 4 more portions of land on the same holding in fee. On a separate holding, Allen Pollock kept land measuring 4 acres, 3 roods and 20 perches in fee. Allen paid £75-10-0 in total for both holdings. Thomas Kelly paid £0-5-0 for 0 acres, 1 rood and 6 perches of garden. The police barracks was exempt from relevant fees. Allen Pollock paid half the annual rent of the police barracks, totaling £10-10-0.

Patrick Quirke paid £4-5-0 for 6 acres, 0 roods and 17 perches of land. Joseph Daly paid £3-15-0 for 5 acres, 2 roods and 35 perches of land. James Branley rented land measuring 4 acres, 2 roods and 20 perches for £3-10-0. James Kearns paid £28-0-0 for land measuring 61 acres, 0 roods and 28 perches. Luke Holian paid £1-15-0 for 1 acre, 3 roods and 13 perches of land. Patrick Nolan paid £3-5-0 for house and land measuring 1 acre, 2 roods and 6 perches. Thomas Horan paid £10-0-0 for 15 acres, 2 roods and 14 perches of land. Mary Quirke paid £9-5-0 for 11 acres, 1 rood and 15 perches of land.

Within the Village of Creggs

Allen Pollock kept 0 acres, 0 roods and 35 perches of house, office and land in fee for £4-5-0. Patrick Thornton paid Allen Pollock £1-0-0 for house and office. Allen Pollock kept 0 acres, 0 roods and 11 perches of house, office and garden for £5-10-0. Thomas Horan paid £2-10-0 for 0 acres, 2 roods and 10 perches of house, office and garden. Allen Pollock kept a garden measuring 0 acres, 0 roods and 30 perches and house, office and garden measuring 0 acres, 1 rood and 22 perches worth a total of £2-5-0.

John Naughton paid £3-10-0 for 0 acres, 1 rood and 22 perches of house, offices and garden. Luke Holian paid £3-5-0 for 0 acres, 0 roods and 29 perches of house, offices and garden. Joseph Daly paid £3-5-0 for 0 acres, 0 roods and 20 perches of house, office and land. Patrick Quirk rented house, offices and garden measuring 0 acres, 1 rood and 12 perches for £4-15-0. Allen Pollock kept a holding of house, offices and garden measuring 2 acres, 3 roods and 10 perches and a holding of house, office and garden measuring 0 acres, 1 rood and 10 perches in fee. The holdings were worth £13-10-0 in total. The National School House was exempt from relevant charges and Allen Pollock paid half the annual rent of £0-10-0. Allen Pollock kept a holding of house, offices and garden measuring 2 acres, 1 rood and 0 perches and a holding of offices and garden measuring 0 acres, 1 rood and 30 perches in fee worth a total of £6-10-0.

Patrick Southwell paid £2-0-0 for 0 acres, 1 rood and 23 perches of house, offices and garden. Michael Costelloe paid £1-10-0 for 0 acres, 1 rood and 16 perches of house and garden. Thomas Kelly paid £2-0-0 for 0 acres, 1 rood and 17 perches of house, office and garden. Francis M. Clean paid £1-0-0 for a house. Mary Boyde paid £1-0-0 for a house. James Giblin paid a total of £3-0-0 for a holding of house, office and garden measuring 0 acres, 1 rood and 18 perches and a house on a separate holding. Michael Kelly paid £2-0-0 for 0 acres, 1 rood and 34 perches of office and garden. Patrick Kelly paid £1-10-0 for 0 acres, 1 rood and 15 perches of house and garden. John Ryan paid £5-5-0 for 1 acre, 1 rood and 10 perches of house, office and garden. James Kearns paid £6-0-0 for house, office and yard. Allen Pollock also earned £20-0-0 for the tolls and customs of fairs and markets. The total annual valuation of rateable property excluding exemptions was £246-0-0.

Census 1901

Creggs Town

There was a total population of 122 people in Creggs Town in 1901, 63 were male and 59 were female. The heads of the households were as follows: Thomas Kearn, John Shanahan, John McGinley, Daniel Lilly, James Noone, Patrick Nolan, Bryan Hurley, Michael Nicholson, Martin Daly, James Tiernan, Bridget Mannion, Bridget Brannelly, Maria O’Keeffe, Michael Dillon, Bridget Southwell, Celia Costello, Catherine Mee, William Keaveney, Luke Kelly, Luke Byrne, James Kearns, Mary E. Quigley, John Ryan and John Rowlett. John Rowlett was head of the R.I.C. Barracks in Creggs. All residents were Roman Catholic, except some members of the R.I.C. Barracks. All residents were from County Galway, unless indicated otherwise.

There were 6 public houses and 18 private dwellings, 17 of which were occupied. There were at least 52 farm steadings, comprising 13 stables, 3 coach houses, 2 harness houses, 8 cow houses, 2 calf houses, 5 piggeries, 3 fowl houses, 2 barns, 4 turf houses, 4 sheds, 5 stores and 1 forge. There were at least 21 more farm steadings or out offices, however due to a missing B2 Return Form, as of the 27th February 2020, the type of outbuilding is unclear. The census forms were collected on the 16th of April.

Thomas Kearn (35) was an unmarried man. He lived with a servant George Kelly (18). Thomas was a publican and draper, while George was a draper’s assistant. Both Thomas and George could read and write. No language was listed for either man, suggesting they spoke English only. The pair occupied a 2nd class public house that had 6 front windows and 7 rooms. The walls were made of permanent material, while the roof was constructed using perishable material. A.B. Pollock of Lismany owned the land on which the public house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 shed and 1 store.

John Shanahan (39) lived with his wife Mary (37), their daughter Alice May (3), nephew Patrick Smyth (17), shop assistant Patrick Grady (18) and 2 servants widowed Margaret Roane (70) and unmarried Bridget Mulry (19). John and Mary were publicans and grocers. Their nephew was a shop assistant. Margaret and Bridget were general domestic servants. Alice May was described as being an infant. The family did not record for who read or write, instead John, his wife, their nephew, Patrick and Bridget were listed as ‘yes’, they had an education. Alice May and Margaret were listed as ‘no’, they had no education. The household spoke English only. John was born in County Tipperary, while the other members of the household were born in County Galway. The family lived in a 1st class public house with 7 front windows and 10 rooms. Both the walls and the roof were made of permanent material. A.B. Pollock owned the land on which the public house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 coach house, 1 harness house, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 turf house, 1 shed and 1 store.

John McGinley (55) lived with his wife Maria Josephine (35) and their 2 children Mary Catherine Josephine (9) and John Thomas (3). John was a police pensioner of the R.I.C. and his daughter was a scholar. John, Maria Josephine and their daughter could read and write, while their son was too young at the time of the census to read or write. Maria Josephine spoke Irish and English, while the rest of the family spoke English only. John was born in County Leitrim, while his wife was born in County Galway. Both the children were born in County Mayo. The McGinley family lived in a 2nd class public house with 3 front windows and 4 rooms. The walls were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. A.B. Pollock owned the land the house was situated on as well as 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 store.

Daniel Lilly (52) was a publican and draper. He lived with his wife Maria (52), his unmarried cousin Catherine Croghan (61), niece Annie Croghan (13) and a boarder Annie Feeney (28). Catherine was a shopkeeper, while Annie was a scholar. Annie Feeny was a national school teacher. All members of the household could read and write. No language was listed for any member of the household. Annie Feeney was born in County Sligo, while the family were born in County Galway. The family occupied a 1st class public house with 11 front windows and 12 rooms. The walls and the roof of the house were made of permanent material. Daniel owned the land on which his house was located along with 3 stables, 1 coach house, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 boiling house, 1 turf house and 1 store.

James Noone (46) lived with his wife Margaret (35), their 5 sons, Pat (17), James (15), Michael (14), Thos (11) and Edward (6) and their 2 daughters Maggie (5) and Bridget (3). James and his 3 eldest sons were agricultural labourers. Thos, Edward and Maggie were scholars. James and his 4 eldest sons could read and write. The youngest son Edward could read only at the time of the census. Neither daughter could read or write as they were too young at the time. Margaret could not read or write, but she spoke Irish and English. The rest of the family spoke English only. The Noone family lived in a 3rd class private dwelling with 1 front window and 1 room. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was constructed using perishable material. A.B. Pollock owned the land on which the house was situated.

Patrick Nolan (86) lived with wife Sarah (83) and their 3 unmarried children, Bridget (50), Mary (52) and Thomas (44). Patrick described his occupation as a process server. Bridget was described as a daughter labour, while Thomas was a harness maker. While each member of the family could read and write, they spoke English only. The Nolan family lived in a 3rd class house with 1 front window and 2 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls of the house, while the roof was made of perishable material. A.B. Pollock owned the land on which the house was situated along with 1 cow house.

Bryan Hurley (54) was a married tailor. He lived with his wife Maria (48), their 4 sons, Frank (18), Bernard (13), James (10) and Thomas (8) and his unmarried sister-in-law Bridget Higgins (40). The eldest son, Frank, worked as an agricultural labourer, while the other 3 sons were scholars. All members of the family could read and write. Bryan, Maria, Frank and Bernard spoke Irish and English, while the rest of the family spoke English only. The family lived in a 3rd class house with just 1 front window and 2 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was constructed using perishable material. A.B. Pollock owned the land on which the house was situated.

Michael Nicholson (47) lived with his wife Anne (47) and their 3 children, Sarah (17), Willie (14) and John (11). Michael and his son Willie were agricultural labourers, while John was a scholar. Michael could not read or write, while his wife could read only. Sarah, Willie and John could read and write. All members of the family spoke Irish and English. The Nicholson family lived in a 3rd class house that had 2 front windows and 2 rooms. Perishable material was used to construct the roof of the house, while permanent material was used for the walls of the house. A.B. Pollock owned the land the house was situated on.

Martin Daly (42) was a publican and grocer. He lived with his wife Ellen (38), their 2 children Delia (7) and Joseph (5) and a general domestic servant, Bridget Nicholson (18). Delia and Joseph were scholars. All members of the household could read and write, except Joseph who was too young at the time. No language was listed for any member of the household, suggesting they spoke English only. The Daly family occupied a 2nd class dwelling with 4 front windows and 4 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls of the house while the roof was made of perishable material. A.B. Pollock owned the land on which the house was located along with 2 stables, 1 calf house, 1 piggery and 1 shed.

James Tiernan (27) lived with his wife Kate (29), their 2 sons George J. (2) and James A. (11 months) and a general domestic servant Bridget Hurley (16). James worked as a shopkeeper. James, Kate and Bridget could read and write, while naturally the children were too young to read or write at the time of the census. The members of the household spoke English only. The Tiernan family lived in a 1st class house with 6 front windows and 9 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls and the roof of the house. A.B. Pollock owned the land on which the house was situated along with 2 stables, 1 coach house, 1 harness house, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 fowl house, 1 barn, 1 turf house, 1 shed and 1 store.

Bridget Mannion (50) was a widow who lived with her unmarried daughter Bridget (23). Bridget worked as a lodginghouse keeper, while no occupation was recorded for her daughter. Both mother and daughter could read and write, while Bridget (Sen.) spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 4 front windows and 2 rooms. The walls were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. A.B. Pollock owned the land on which the house was situated as well as 1 cow house.

Bridget Brannelly (66) was a widow. She lived with her 2 unmarried children, Patrick (41) and Mary (26). Bridget was a retired national school teacher, while Patrick worked as a national school teacher. Bridget was from County Roscommon, while her children were born in County Galway. All members of the family could read and write, as well as speak Irish and English. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 5 front windows and 5 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls of the house, while the roof was made of perishable material. A.B. Pollock owned the land on which the house was located along with 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 barn.

Marie O’Keeffe (52) was a widow, who lived with her 3 unmarried daughters, Bridget (20), Lizzie (19) and Ellie (18) and her 2 sons James (15) and William (10). Marie and her 2 eldest daughters worked as egglers. Ellie, James and William were scholars. All members of the family could read and write. Marie spoke Irish and English, while her family spoke English only. The family occupied a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 4 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. A.B. Pollock owned the land on which the house was situated as well as 2 stables, 1 piggery and 1 turf house.

Michael Dillon (45) was a widower who worked as a boot shoemaker. He lived with his 2 sons, James (18) and John (10) and his 2 daughters, Jean (12) and Kate (8). The 3 youngest children were scholars. All members of the family could read and write, except Kate who could read only. Michael spoke Irish and English, while his family spoke English only. The Dillon family lived in a 2nd class house with 2 front windows and 2 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls of the house, while the roof was made of perishable material. A.B. Pollock owned the land the house was situated on.

Bridget Southwell (70) was a widow who lived with her son Pat (40). There were 2 boarders staying in the house, Michael Flemming (60) and Martin Keane (60). Bridget was a lodginghouse keeper, while Pat worked as a blacksmith. Michael and Martin were agricultural labourers. While only Pat and Martin could read and write, each person in the household spoke Irish and English. The Southwell family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. A.B. Pollock owned the land on which the house was situated along with 1 forge.

Celia Costello (28) was an unmarried seamstress. She lived with her unmarried sister Jennie (26), who also worked as a seamstress. Both Celia and Jennie could read and write. The sister spoke English only. The sisters lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls of the house, while the roof was made of perishable material. A.B. Pollock owned the land on which the house was situated along with 1 farm steading.

Catherine Mee (70) was a widow, who lived with her 2 unmarried children James (40) and Mary (30). Each member of the family was recorded as a retired grocer. While Catherine could read only, she spoke Irish and English. The children could read and write but spoke English only. The family occupied a 2nd class dwelling with 3 front windows and 2 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. A.B. Pollock owned the land on which the house was located along with 5 farm steadings.

William Keaveney (47) lived with his wife Mary (46), their 2 daughters, Margaret (17) and Anne (6) and their 2 sons, John (15) and William (9). William worked as a carpenter, while each of the children were scholars. Each member of the family could read and write. There was no language listed for any member of the family, suggesting they spoke English only. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 1 front window and 2 rooms. The walls were constructed using permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. A.B. Pollock owned the land on which the house was situated.

Luke Kelly (45) was a married blacksmith. He lived with his wife Catherine (45), their 3 daughters, Sarah (15), Anne (13) and Mary (10) and their 4 sons, Michael (22), John (9), Thomas (8) and Luke (3). Michael also worked as a blacksmith, while the other children were scholars. Luke could not read or write, and his wife could read only, however, they both spoke Irish and English. All their children could read and write, except the youngest Luke, who was too young at the time of the census. The children spoke English only. The Kelly family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. A.B. Pollock owned the land on which the house was situated as well as 1 farm steading.

Luke Byrne (31) was a married baker. He lived his wife Bridget (26) and his 2 sons, Arthur (3) and Edward (2). Luke and his wife could read and write, while the children were too young at the time of the census. The family spoke English only. Luke was born in Dublin City, while his wife was from County Carlow. The children were born in County Leitrim. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 2 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. A.B. Pollock owned the land on which the house was situated as well as 1 farm steading.

James Kearns (50) lived with his wife Sarah (33), their 2 sons Thomas (4) and James (2), their 2 daughters Celia (3) and Bridget (3 months), his widowed aunt Hanoria Brooke (73) and cousin Mary Kelly (22). There were 6 servants in the household, Joseph Leonard (17), Stephen Burke (21) and Michael Lohan were grocer’s assistants. Margaret Lowry (25) and Winifred Loftis (18) were general domestic servants, while John O’Donoughe (48) was a farm servant. James was a shopkeeper and farmer, while Hanoria recorded her occupation as a retired farmer’s widow and Mary was a farmer’s daughter. All members of the household could read and write, except the 4 children and Margaret Lowry. Sarah was born in County Mayo, while both Stephen Burke and John O’Donoughe were born in County Roscommon. Sarah, Hanoria, Mary, Margaret and Winifred spoke Irish and English, while the rest of the household spoke English only. The Kearns family occupied a 2nd class house with 5 front windows and 8 rooms. The walls were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. James Kearns owned the land on which his house was situated along as well as 8 farm steadings.

Mary E. Quigley (22) was married and her occupation as an R.I.C. constable’s wife. She lived with her daughter Linda (8 months). Mary could read and write. Both Mary and her daughter were born in County Mayo. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows, the number of rooms was not listed. Permanent material was used to construct the walls of the house, while perishable material was used for the roof. Daniel Lilly owned the land the house was situated on as well as 1 farm steading.

John Ryan (76) was a retired grocer. He lived with his wife Alice (71). Both John and Alice could read and write. The pair spoke English only. The Ryan family lived in a 2nd class house with 4 front windows and 5 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof of the house was made of perishable material. A.B. Pollock owned the land on which the house was situated as well as 2 farm steadings.

R.I.C. Barracks

There was an R.I.C. Barracks in Creggs. Only the initials of the officers were recorded. J.R. (42) was the sergeant. He was a Methodist from County Sligo. I.G. (37) was a married constable. He was a Roman Catholic, born in County Longford. T.Q. (32) was a married constable from County Mayo. He was a Roman Catholic. W.A. N. (23) an unmarried constable. He was a Presbyterian from Londonderry. S.C. (22) was also a Presbyterian, he was a constable from County Tyrone. Each of the men were farmer’s sons. The Barracks was a 1st class building, with 6 front windows. Permanent material was used to construct the walls and the roof of the barracks. A.B. Pollock owned the land on which the Barracks was located.

Henrietta J. Rowlett (30) was the sergeant’s wife. She was a Methodist from County Roscommon. She could read and write but spoke English only.

Creggs

Pat Mulvihill (54) was a married shepherd. He lived with his wife Maty (48), their 2 daughters, Kate (22) and Margaret (11), their 6 sons, Patrick (20), Thomas (18), Martin (16), Michael (13), James (9) and William (6) and his widowed mother Margaret Hegarty (74). Kate’s occupation was listed only as daughter, while Patrick was a shepherd and Thomas was an agricultural labourer. The other children were scholars. All members of the family could read and write, except Pat who could not read. Each person in the family spoke English only, except for Pat’s mother Margaret who spoke Irish and English. The family lived in a 3rd class house with 1 front window and 2 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. Sarah Satchwell owned the land on which the house was situated along with 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

Census 1911

There was a total population of 125 people, 71 of whom were male and 54 were female. The heads of the households were as follows: Maria O’Keeffe, Patrick Brannelly, Michael Dillion, Martin Lohan, Thomas Nolan, James Noone, Catherine Croghan, Catherine Mee, Luke Kelly, Honor Crean, James Kearns, John Shanahan, John McGinley, Patrick Kilby, Michael Nicholson, Thomas Nolan, Thomas Featherston, Michael Kelly, Martin Feeney, Edward M. Donnelly, William Keaveny, James Kelly, Kate H. Kelly and James Kearns. James Kelly was the head of the R.I.C. Barracks. All residents were born in County Galway, unless indicated otherwise. All inhabitants were Roman Catholic, except J.T. of the R.I.C. Barracks, who listed his religion as Church of Ireland.

There were 25 private dwellings, 22 of which were occupied. There was also Creggs National School, the R.I.C. Barracks and 1 warehouse. There were 87 farm steadings, comprising 8 stables, 3 coach houses, 1 harness house, 11 cow houses, 6 calf houses, 1 dairy, 7 piggeries, 8 fowl houses, 3 boiling rooms, 2 barns, 3 turf houses, 25 sheds, 6 stores, 2 forges and 1 laundry. The census forms were collected on the 5th of April.

Maria O’Keeffe (64) was a widow who lived with her 3 children, Lizzie (28), James (24) and William (20). Maria had been married for 42 years and had 12 children before being widowed. 9 of her children were living in 1911. Maria was born in County Roscommon, while her 3 children were born in County Galway. Maria worked as a farmer and her 2 sons were labourers. All members of the family could read and write. No language was listed for any member of the family, suggesting they spoke English only. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 2 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. Maria owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 shed and 1 store.

Patrick Brannelly (51) was an unmarried man who lived with his widowed mother Bridget (77) and his unmarried sister Mary (36). Bridget was married for 53 years and had 9 children before being widowed. 6 of her children were living in 1911. Bridget was born in County Roscommon and her 2 children were born in County Galway. Patrick worked as nation school teacher. All members of the family could read and write. No language was listed for any member of the family. The Brannelly family lived in 2nd class house with 4 front windows and 3 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls of the house, while perishable material was used for the roof. Bridget owned the land on which the house was located along with 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 shed.

Michael Dillion (52) was a widower who lived with his unmarried son John (20). Michael worked as a shopkeeper, while John was a labourer. Michael could read only, but he spoke both Irish and English. John could read and write but spoke English only. The Dillion family lived in a 3rd house with 2 front windows and 1 room. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while perishable material was used to construct to the roof of the house. Michael owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 shed.

Martin Lohan (46) was an unmarried farmer. He lived with his 2 unmarried sisters Mary (48) and Bridget (52). Each of the siblings could read and write, but they each spoke English only. The Lohan family lived in a 2nd class house with 2 front windows and 3 rooms. Both the walls and the roof of the house were made of permanent material. Martin owned the land on which the house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 fowl house, 1 boiling house and 1 shed.

Thomas Nolan (60) was an unmarried saddler. He lived with his 2 unmarried sisters Bridget (62) and Mary (65). All members of the family could read and write, however, each of them spoke English only. The siblings lived in a 3rd class house with 1 front window and 1 room. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while perishable material was used for the roof of the house. Thomas owned the land on which the house was situated along with 1 shed.

James Noone (60) lived with his wife of 28 years Margaret (48) and their 5 sons, James (26), Thomas (20), Edward (17), Harry (10) and John (8) and their 2 daughters Bridget (19) and Margaret (14). James and Margaret had 11 children, 8 of whom were living in 1911. James and his 3 eldest sons worked as labourers. Bridget worked as a domestic servant, while the 3 youngest children were scholars. All members of the family could read and write, except James’ wife Bridget who could not read. No language is listed for any member of the family, suggesting they spoke English only. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 2 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls and the roof of the house. James owned the land on which his house was situated.

Catherine Croghan (72) was an unmarried woman who lived alone. Catherine could read and write, but he spoke English only. She lived in a 3rd class house with 2 front windows and 1 room. The walls of the house were made of permanent material while the roof of the house was made of perishable material. Catherine owned the land on which her house was situated along with 1 shed.

Catherine Mee (88) was a widow who lived with her 2 unmarried children James (52) and Mary (40). Catherine had been married for 49 years and had 7 children before being widowed. 4 of her children were living in 1911. Each member of the family was a retired grocer. Catherine could read only, but she spoke Irish and English. Her children could read and write but spoke English only. The Mee family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 2 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. Catherine owned the land on which the house was located along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Luke Kelly (63) was a widower. He lived with his 2 unmarried sons Tom (20) and Luke (11). Luke and Tom worked as blacksmiths, while the youngest son Luke was a scholar. Luke could not read or write, but he spoke Irish and English. Both sons could read and write, but they spoke English only. The Kelly family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 2 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls, while the roof was made of perishable material. Luke owned the land on which the house was situated along with 1 fowl house, 1 shed and 1 forge.

Honor Crean (51) lived with her married brother Matthew Halligan (34), his wife Kate Halligan (39) and their daughter Ellen Halligan (11 months). Martin and Kate had been married for 3 years and had 1 child in 1911. Honor listed her occupation as small farmer, while Martin was a baker. Martin was born in County Kildare, while his wife Kate was born in County Westmeath. Honor and Ellen were born in County Galway. All members of the household could read and write, except Ellen who natural was too young at the time of the census. No language was listed for any member of the family. The family lived in a 3rd house with 2 front windows and 1 room. The walls of the house were made of permanent material; perishable material was used for the roof of the house. Honor owned the land on which the house was situated along with 1 shed.

James Kearns (61) lived with his wife Sarah (43), their 4 daughters Cecelia (13), Bridget (10), Norah (7) and Mary (5), their son James (11) and their 2 servants, James Rorke [sic] (35) and Sarah Anne Griffin (15). James and Sarah had been married for 16 years and had 7 children, 6 of whom were living in 1911. James worked as a shopkeeper/farmer, while each of his children were scholars. James Rorke was a labourer and Sarah Anne was a domestic servant. All members of the household were born in County Galway, except Sarah Kearns and Sarah Anne Griffin, both of whom were born in County Mayo. Each person in the household could read and write, except the youngest child Mary who was naturally too young at the time of the census. Sarah Kearns and Sarah Anne Griffin spoke both Irish and English, while the other members of the household spoke English only. The Kearns family lived in a 1st class house with 9 front windows and 9 rooms. Both the walls and the roof of the house were made using permanent material. James Kearns owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 coach house, 1 harness house, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 dairy, 1 fowl house, 1 boiling house, 1 barn, 1 shed, 1 store and 1 laundry.

John Shanahan (50) lived with his wife of 6 years Catherine (41), their 2 daughters Alice (13) and Mary (4), their son Thomas (5), servant John Mulvihill (23) and boarder Michael Joseph Kelly (20). Each member of the household was born in County Galway, except John who was born in County Tipperary. John worked as shopkeeper, while each of his children were scholars. John was a labourer and Michael Joseph was a clerk for estate commissioners. All members of the household could read and write, except the 2 youngest children who naturally were too young to read or write at the time of the census. No language was listed for any person in the household. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 5 front windows and 3 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls and the roof of the house. Joh owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 coach house, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 turf house, 1 shed and 1 store.

John McGinley (64) lived with his wife Maria J. (51) and their son John J. (13). John and Maria had been married for 29 years and had 2 children, both of whom were living in 1911. John was born in County Leitrim, his wife Maria was born in County Galway and their son was born in County Mayo. John was a police pensioner, while his son was a scholar. All members of the McGinley family could read and write. John J. spoke Irish and English, while his parents spoke English only. The family occupied a 3rd class building with 3 front windows and 1 room. The walls were made of permanent material, while the roof was constructed using perishable material. John owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 shed.

Patrick Kilby (35) was an unmarried man who lived with his 2 unmarried brothers Michl (33) and Thos (45), 3 shop assistants Thos Mulligan (20), Thos O’Leary (17) and John Early (17) and servant Ellen Comer (50). Patrick and his brother Michl worked as merchants, while his brother Thos was a labourer. Each person was born in County Galway, except Thos O’Leary who was born in County Roscommon. All members of the household could read and write. Patrick, his 2 brothers and Ellen spoke Irish and English, while the other members of the house spoke English only. The family lived in a 1st class house with 9 front windows and 8 rooms. Both the walls and the roof of the house were made of permanent material. Patrick owned the land on which his house was located along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 boiling house, 1 shed and 1 store.

Michael Nicholson (56) lived with his wife of 36 years Annie (68) and their unmarried son John (23). Michael and Annie had 9 children, 6 of whom were living in 1911. Michael worked as a farmer, while his son John was a labourer. John was the only member of the family that could read and write, while Annie could read only, and Michael could neither read nor write. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls and the roof of the house. Michael owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 shed.

Thomas Nolan (30) lived with his wife Celia (38) and his sister-in-law Jane Costello (36). Thomas and Celia had been married for 3 years in 1911. Thomas worked as a blacksmith, while both Celia and Jane were dressmakers. All members of the family could read and write. No language was listed for any member of the family, suggesting they spoke English only. The Nolan family lived in a 3rd class house with 1 front window and 1 room. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. Thomas owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 fowl house and 1 forge.

Thomas Featherston (55) lived with his wife Maria (50), sister-in-law Bridget Higgins (46), stepsons James Hurley (24) and Thosett [sic] (19) and 2 boarders Patrick McNally (42) and Patrick Dodd (33). Thomas and Maria had been married for 8 eights at the time of the census. Thomas worked as a tailor, while his stepsons were labourers. Patrick McNally was a mason, while Patrick Dodd also had an occupation, however it is not legible on the census form. Each person in the household could read and write, except Maria who could not read or write. All members of the household spoke English only, except Patrick McNally who spoke Irish and English. The family occupied a 3rd class house with 3 front windows and just 1 room. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. Thomas owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 shed.

Michael Kelly (64) was a married shopkeeper. He lived with his wife Bridget (43), their 2 sons John (6) and Nicholas (3) and their niece Delia Daly (17). Michael and Bridget had been married for 27 years and had 7 children, all of whom were living in 1911. John, Nicholas and Delia were scholars. All members of the family could read and write, except Nicholas who was naturally too young at the time of the census. No language was listed for any member of the family, suggesting they spoke English only. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls of the house, while the roof was made of perishable material. Michael owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 shed.

Martin Feeney (45) was a married man who lived with his 2 unmarried nieces Annie Sweeney (22) and Eliza Sweeney (20) and servant John Kelly (18). Martin was a shopkeeper, while John was a labourer. All members of the household could read and write. Each person in the household was born in County Roscommon. No language was listed for any person in the house. The family occupied a 2nd class house with 4 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. Martin owned the land on which his house was situated as well as 1 stable, 1 coach house, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 shed and 1 store.

Edward M. Donnelly (40) lived with his wife Mary Ellen (31), their 3 daughters Louisa K. (11), Mary Ellen (9) and Josephine Sara (2 months) and their 4 sons Michael P. (8), Edward C. (6), Thomas Joe (3) and Ignatius James (1). Edward, his wife and their eldest child Louisa K. were born in County Roscommon, while the other children were born in County Galway. Edward and Mary Ellen had been married for12 years and 7 children by 1911. Edward M. was a constable in the R.I.C., while his 5 eldest children were scholars. All members of the family could read and write, except Thomas Joe who could read only and the 2 youngest children who could not read or write. No language was listed for any member of the family. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 2 front windows and 3 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls and the roof of the house. Patt Kilby owned the land on which the house was situated along with 1 turf house and 1 shed.

William Keaveny (55) and his wife of 26 years Mary (54) lived with their 3 unmarried children, Margaret (25), William (19) and Annie (15). William and Mary had 5 children, 4 of whom were living in 1911. William and his son worked as carpenters. Mary was a dressmaker, while the youngest child Annie was a scholar. All members of the family could read and write. No language was listed for any family member. The family occupied a 2nd class dwelling with 3 front windows and 2 rooms. Both the walls and the roof of the house were constructed using permanent material. William owned the land on which his house was situated along with 1 shed.

James Kelly (36) lived with his wife Annie (38), their daughter Mary Veronica (2), his widowed mother-in-law Catherine Feeney (74) and domestic servant Kate Connelly (16). James and Annie had been married for 4 years and had 1 child. James was a constable in the R.I.C., while his wife Annie was a national school teacher. Catherine had her occupation listed as visitor. All members of the household could read and write, except Mary Veronica, who was naturally too young to read at the time of the census. No language was listed for any individual, suggesting they each spoke English only. James was born in County Mayo, while his wife and mother-in-law were born in County Sligo. Both Mary Veronica and Kate Connelly were born in County Galway. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. Permanent material was used for the walls and the roof of the house. Martin Lohan owned the land on which the house was situated along with 1 shed.

R.I.C. Barracks

J.K. (50) was a sergeant in the R.I.C. He was married and listed his place of birth as King’s Co. J.F. (40) was an unmarried constable from County Sligo. N.G. (31) was born in County Roscommon and was an unmarried constable in the R.I.C. J.T. (29) was an unmarried constable from County Roscommon. D.M. was born in County Mayo and served as a constable. J. McK. (24) was originally from County Fermanagh and worked as a constable. B.C. (22) was an unmarried constable from County Kerry. All men were listed as farmer’s sons. Each member of the barracks could read and write. Each listed their religion as Roman Catholic, except J.T. who recorded his religion as Church of Ireland. According to the census records the barracks was a 2nd class building with 5 front windows and 3 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls and the roof of the house. Allen B. Pollock owned the land on which the barracks was situated along with 1 turf house and 1 shed.

Kate H. Kelly (40) was married for 22 years and had 9 children, all of whom were living in 1911. She lived with her 5 sons Patrick Wm (14), Francis J. (8), Henry S. (6), Thos M. (4) and George A. (1). and her daughter Mary K. (12). All the children were scholars, except George A. who was naturally too young to attend school at the time of the census. All members of the family could read and write, except Thos M. who could read only and the youngest child who neither read nor write. Kate H. was born in County Clare, while her children were born in County Galway.

James Kearns was the head of a building that was listed as a warehouse. Joseph Leonard (26) was a shop assistant from County Roscommon. Maria Mulvihill (24) was from County Roscommon and worked as a dressmaker. William Neary (21) was from County Galway and listed his occupation as a shop assistant. Patk Crean (19) from County Roscommon was also a shop assistant. John Mulligan (19) was a shop assistant from County Galway. Margaret Hegarty (18), Sarah Coughlin (18) and Margaret Connell (18) all worked as dressmakers. Sarah Coughlin was from County Roscommon, while the other two were both from County Galway. Each person could read and write. Joseph Leonard, William Neary, Patk Crean, John Mulligan and Margaret Connell each spoke Irish and English, while the others spoke English only. The warehouse was a 2nd class building with 5 front windows and 4 rooms. James Kearns owned the land on which the warehouse was situated along with 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 shed.

This page was added on 12/05/2020.

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