Ballyfinegan

Baile Uí Fhionnagáin

Emma Ruane/Heritage Office, Galway County Council

Ballyfinegan
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Ballyfinegan

Civil Parish of Kilbegnet

Baile Uí Fhionnagáin, O’Finnagan’s Town

Ballyfinegan is situated in the civil parish of Kilbegnet, in the barony of Ballymoe, County Galway. The townland of Ballyfinegan is located 1¼ miles east of Moat East Village.

The Down Survey Map (post Cromwell) shows Ballyfinegan was owned by John Bourke (Catholic) and Sir Maurice Hurley (Protestant) in 1670. No information is provided about the profitability of the land.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books states a road passes through Ballyfinegan from South to North East. Close to the Northern boundary, there is a Danish fort. The land of Ballyfinegan is tillage and pastoral.

Census 1841-1851

In 1851, Ballyfinegan was made up of 120 acres, 0 roods and 35 perches. In 1841, there was a total of 20 people, 10 males and 10 females, occupying a total of 4 houses. The population numbers remained the same in 1851, with 10 males and 10 females. In 1851, there was a total of 3 houses, all of which were occupied. The poor law valuation paid in 1851 was £65-10-0.

Griffith’s Valuation 1847-1864

Allen Pollock owned the land and leased the total 120 acres, 0 roods and 35 perches. Terence Flanagan rented 3 acres, 2 roods and 32 perches of house, offices and land. Terence paid £3-0-0 per annum. Catherine Flanagan lived on the same holding without charge. Allen Pollock also leased 116 acres, 1 rood and 35 perches of herd’s house, office and land to Fredrick Carroll. Fredrick Carroll paid an annual rent of £75-10-0 for this area. The total annual valuation of rateable property was £79-10-0.

Census 1901

There were 2 households in Ballyfinegan in 1901. The heads of the houses were Peter Keavney and Pat Early. There was a total population of 21 people, 7 were male and 14 were female. The houses were listed as private dwellings. There were 3 farm steadings and out-offices, comprising 1 workshop, 1 cow house and 1 piggery. The census forms were collected on the 1st of April 1901.

Peter Keavney (48) worked as a carpenter and joiner and lived with his wife Maria (47) and their 7 daughters, Maggie (19), Mary (17), Delia (15), Norah (13), Annie (11), Lizzie (8) and Ellie (5). All the children were scholars, except Mary who was a dressmaker. All members of the family could read and write, except Ellie who could not read as she was too young. The Keavney family occupied a 2nd class house with 4 front windows and 3 rooms. Permanent material was used to construct the walls of the house, while the roof was made of perishable material. Peter owned the land his house was located on, along with 1 workshop.

Pat Early (42) lived with his wife Catherine (35) and their 10 unmarried children, Anne (15), Maria (13), Thomas (11), Kate (11), Bridget (9), Ellen (8), John James (6), Patrick (5), Bernard (3) and Martin (1). Pat worked as a shepherd and his 7 eldest children were scholars. Pat could read only, but his wife and their 7 eldest children could read and write. Naturally, the 3 youngest children could not read at the time of the census. The Early family occupied a 2nd class house that had 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made using permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. Thomas Hanly owned the land as well as 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

Census 1911

In 1911, there were 2 households in Ballyfinegan, headed by Peter Keavney and Pat Eardley [variation in spelling since 1901 census]. The total population in Ballyfinegan was 17 people, 6 of which were male and 11 were female. The houses were listed as private dwellings and the census shows there were 2 fowl house and 1 barn. The census forms were collected on the 3rd of April.

Peter Keavney (59) lived with his wife Maria (59) and their 2 unmarried children Annie (20) and Ellen (15). Peter and Maria had been married for 31 years in 1911 and had 7 children. Peter worked as a carpenter and Ellen was a scholar. All members of the household could read and write. No language was recorded for the family, suggesting they spoke English only. The family lived in a 2nd class dwelling. The house had 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The walls of the house were made using permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. Peter owned the land the land his house was situated on as well as 1 fowl house.

Pat Eardley (56) listed his occupation as a herd and lived with his wife Catherine (48) and their 11 children, Maria (24), Thomas (23), Katie (21), Bridget (20), Ellen (18), Patrick (15), Martin (11), Joseph (9), Maggie (9), Agnes (5) and Lizzie (3). At the time of the census, Pat and Catherine had been married for 27 years and had 14 children. Katie was a seamstress, while Martin, Joseph, Maggie and Agnes were scholars. All members of the family could read and write, except from Lizzie who naturally could not read. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 front windows and 3 rooms. The house walls were made of permanent material, while the roof was made of perishable material. Thomas Hanly owned the land along with 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

 

This page was added on 20/04/2020.

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