Alloon Lower

Alumhan or Alúin Íochtarach

Mike Kelly/Galway Rural Development

Alloon Lower / Alumhan or Alúin Íochtarach                                             Irish Grid M 68471 38050

 

Author: Mike Kelly/Galway Rural Development

 

The townland of Alloon Lower is in the civil parish of Ballymacward, in the barony of Tiaquin and the County of Galway.

 

Situation:

It is situated in the eastern side of the Civil Parish of Ballymacward, in the barony of Tiaquin, and is bounded by Alloonbaun, Alloon Upper, Esker and Lisskub West, townlands in same barony and by Lisskub East in the barony of Kilconnell. The townland shares boundaries with the following townlands:

 

Description:

John O’Donovan 1806-1861


O’Donovan states that it belongs to Lord Clancarty held by deed for ever. It is all under a good state of cultivation, although the land is of a bad marly quality, the houses and roads are in very good repair. The inhabitants live comfortably. The County Cess is £7. 2. 5½ for the summer half year of 1837 including Alloon Upper.

 

Census of Ireland 1821 – 1911

The first full population census of Ireland was taken in 1821 and every ten years thereafter and the first four were arranged by county, barony, civil parish and townland.

1821: Only some fragments for small parts of county Galway survive. There are no surviving records for Ballymacward.

1831: The only surviving records are from Counties Antrim and Derry.

1841: There are no surviving records for County Galway.

1851: There are no surviving records for County Galway.

1861: Census records for 1861 and 1871 were deliberately destroyed by the government

1881: The records for 1881 and 1891 were pulped as waster paper during the shortages of World War I.

1901: Full Census records are available. See below.

1911: Full Census records are available See below.

 

1911 Census

Overview of townland

There was 1 house in total in this townland, which was built and is recorded as a private dwelling. The house had stone or brick walls and a roof of thatch, wood or other perishable material. The dwelling was recorded as 2nd class. There was a total of 4 people living in the townland of which 2 were male and 2 were female. All four were Roman Catholic and all four were born in County Galway. There was a total of 6 out buildings listed for the dwelling which comprised of a stable, cow house, calf house, piggery, fowl house and a barn.

House 1: Costello

The household was headed by John Costello, a 50-year-old married farmer. He lived with his wife, Margaret (73), daughter Nannie (25) and son John aged 24. Both John and Nannie were single and John’s occupation is given as farmer’s son while no occupations are recorded for the women. All four were Roman Catholic, had been born in County Galway and all could read and write. The couple had been married for 26 years and had 2 children, both still living. The dwelling is described as a 2nd class house that had three rooms with six windows. The roof of the house was thatch and the walls stone or brick. The head of household was also the landholder.

 

1901 Census

Overview of townland

There was 1 house in total in this townland, which was built and is recorded as a private dwelling. The house had stone or brick walls and a roof of thatch, wood or other perishable material. The dwelling was recorded as 2nd class and had 2 rooms and 6 windows. There was a total of 4 people living in the townland of which 2 were male and 2 were female. All four were Roman Catholic and all four were born in County Galway.

House 1: Costelloe

The household was headed by John Costello, a 33-year-old married farmer. He lived with his wife, Margaret (45), daughter Annie (14) and son John aged 12. The younger John’s occupation is given as scholar and his sister as a farmer’s daughter while no occupation is recorded for their mother. All four were Roman Catholic, had been born in County Galway and all could read and write. Head of the household, John Costelloe, is recorded as speaking both English and Irish.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation

The Primary Valuation of Ireland in 1855 was a survey involving a detailed valuation of every taxable holding of agricultural or built property on the island of Ireland. It was completed between 1864 and 1865.

According to Griffith’s, the land at Alloon Lower was owned by the Earl of Clancarty and covered a total area of 81 acres, 3 roods and 10 perches and the total valuation rate paid in Alloon Lower was £37-05s-0d. John Ryder paid an annual rent of £11-10s-0 for 22 acres of land and buildings £10 for the land and £1-10s for the buildings. The remaining 59 acres, 3 roods and 10 perches were leased by James Costelloe for an annual rent of £25-15s for land only.

This page was added on 20/11/2019.

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