Carrowholla

Cheathrú Tholla

Mike Kelly/Galway Rural Development

Carrowholla/ Cheathrú Tholla      Irish Grid M 67560 33399

  

Author: Mike Kelly/Galway Rural Development

 

The townland of Carrowholla is in the civil parish of Ballymacward, in the barony of

Kilconnell and the County of Galway.

 

Situation:

O’ Donovan states that the townland lies in the S. East of the parish in the Barony of Kilconnel, is bounded by Green Hills, Ballanalough, Carrana Upper and Tullawicky townlands, in this parish, by Monaveen and Carhoomore in the parish of Kilconnel and by Woodlawn in the parish of Killaan, all in Kilconnel barony. This is a list of townlands that share a border with this townland.

 

Description:

It is the property of Lord Ashtown by deed for ever. It consists partly of small hills covered with a light dry soil, yet of a good quality. It is in a good state of cultivation. There are several Turloughs in it. The houses are mostly in good repair.

 

 

Census of Ireland (1821- 1911)

The first full population census of Ireland was taken in 1821 and the first four Irish censuses were arranged by county, barony, civil parish and townland.

 

1821: Only some fragments for small parts of county Galway survive. There are no records     for Ballymacward.

1831: The only surviving records are from Counties Antrim and Derry.

1841: There are no surviving records for County Galway.

1851:   There are no surviving records for County Galway.

1861: Census records for 1861 and 1871 were deliberately destroyed by the government

1881: The records for 1881 and 1891 were pulped as waster paper during the shortages of World War I.

1901:   Full Census records are available   See below.

1911:   Full Census records are available   See below.

 

1911 Census

Overview of townland

There were 12 houses in total in this townland, all of which were built and are recorded as private dwellings with only one unoccupied. All houses had stone or brick walls, and 9 had roofs of slate, iron or tiles whilst dwelling numbers one and seven were thatched. All dwellings were recorded as 2nd class. There was a total of 69 people living in the townland of which 41 were male and 28 were female. All were Roman Catholics. The heads of the households were also the landholders with the exception of house number 9, (James Molloy) where the land owner is given as Patrick Raftery of Carrowmore. There was a total of 45 out buildings listed for the townland which comprised of 12 stables, 11 cow houses, 2 calf houses, 8 piggeries, 2 fowl houses, 7 barns, 2 turf houses and one potato house.

 

House 1: Kelly/Costello/Maher

The head of the household was William Kelly, a 49-year-old married farmer who lived with his wife Anne (39) and family which consisted of daughters Mary (7), Delia (6), both scholars and one-year-old Anne as well as sons Michael (5), a scholar and Joseph (3). Also in the house were William’s unmarried brothers, Patrick (38) and Peter (35) who are both described as farmer’s sons. They had been married for 9 years and had 5 children all of whom were still living. The household was completed by 14-year-old farm servant, James Maher while 20-year-old unmarried Mary Costello is recorded as a visitor. All the occupants were Roman Catholic and, with the exception of the three youngest children, all could read and write and everyone was from County Galway. There is no language proficiency recorded for anyone. The house is described as a 2nd class private dwelling with walls of stone or brick and a roof of thatch or wood and had 2 rooms and 4 windows. There were 6 outbuildings consisting of 2 stables, 1 cow-house, 1 piggery, 1 barn and a turf shed.

 

House 2 : Kelly

The head of the household was Richard Kelly, a 63-year-old married farmer who lived with his wife Ester (60) and family. They had been married for 38 years and had 4 children all still living. Also in the house were their unmarried sons – Richard (38), Thomas (32) and John (35). They are described as farmer’s sons and John is listed as a harmless lunatic. All the occupants were Roman Catholic, could read and write and all came from County Galway. There is no language proficiency recorded for anyone. The house is described as a 2nd class private dwelling with walls of stone or brick, a slate roof and had 3 rooms and 6 windows. There were 6 outbuildings consisting of a stable, 2 cow-houses, calf-house, piggery and a barn.

 

House 3: Kelly/Murphy

The head of the household was Joseph Kelly, a 60-year-old married farmer who lived with his wife Charlotte (45) and family. They had been married for 25 years and had 13 children, all still living. On census night the family consisted of daughters Kate (17), Maggie (13) and 12-year-old Bridget as well as sons Joseph (18), Thomas (16), Robert (15), Michael (11) and Willie (9), Dominick and 3-year-old John. All the children are described as scholars except the 2 youngest and as such, all the older children could read and write. There is no occupation listed for the eldest son, Joseph and himself and both parents could read only. Also in the house was 65-year-old Tom Murphy, an unmarried farm servant unable to read or write. All the occupants were Roman Catholic and all came from County Galway. There is no language proficiency recorded for anyone. The house is described as a 2nd class private dwelling with walls of stone or brick and a slated roof. There were 8 outbuildings consisting of 2 stables, a cow-house, a piggery, fowl-house, barn, a turf shed and a potato-house.

  

House 4: Bellew/Blehein

The head of the household is listed as married farmer, John Bellew aged 50. He lived with his wife Ellie (33) and their family. They had been married for 18 years and had 4 children, 3 of whom were still living – sons Patrick (12), Michael (10) who were both scholars and 2-year-old Martin. Also in the house was John’s 74-year-old mother-in-law, Mary Blehein, a widow who had been married for 40 years and had one child. Neither John nor his mother-in-law were able to write but his wife and elder sons could both read and write. All the occupants were Roman Catholic and came from County Galway. The house is described as 2nd class with stone or brick walls, a slate roof and had 2 rooms and 2 windows. There were no outbuildings recorded.

 

House 5: Glynn/Clarke

The head of this household was Ellen Glynn, a 74-year-old widow who had been married for 51 years and had one child still living. Also in the house were her farmer son James (48) and daughter-in-law Mary (47) as well as her grandchildren Michael (16), Ellie (14) and 6-year-old Lawrence. They had been married for 18 years and had 3 children all still living. The younger 2 children are described as attending school but no occupation is recorded for 16-year-old Michael. Ellen Glynn’s 48-year-old sister Nora Clarke was also present. All the occupants were Roman Catholic, all could read and write and all originated in County Galway. The house was 2nd class with stone walls, a slate roof and had 2 rooms and 3 windows. There were 3 outbuildings – a stable, a cow-house and a piggery.

 

House 6: Neill

The head of the family was 60-year-old widow Ellen Neill. She had been married for 26 years and had 5 children, 3 of whom were still living. She shared the house with her sons Patrick (24), a farmer’s son and Harry (18), a railway porter as well as her 20-year-old daughter Mary. None of the siblings were married and all the occupants were Roman Catholic, could read and write and came from County Galway. The house was 2nd class and had stone walls and a slate roof as well as 2 rooms and 4 windows. The family had 4 outbuildings consisting of a stable, cow-house, piggery and a fowl-house.

 

House 7: Quinn

The head of the household was widower John Quinn aged 80. He lived with his widowed daughter-in-law, Maria (41) who had been married for 16 years and had 5 children, 4 still living. Also in the house were John’s grandchildren – Bridget A. (16) for whom no occupation is given and Esther (14), John (13), Michael (11) and 8-year-old Martin – all described as scholars. All the occupants were Roman Catholic and all originated in County Galway. With the exception of the head of the family, all could read and write. The house was 2nd class with stone walls, a thatched roof, 2 rooms and 3 windows. The 5 outbuildings were a stable, cow-house, calf-house, piggery and a barn.

 

House 8: Earls

The head of the household was Eliza Earls, a 60-year-old widow. She had been married for 34 years and had 10 children, all still living. She lived with her sons Thomas (32), a painter, Patrick (25), a farmer’s son, Joseph (17) and Michael (13), a scholar. Joseph is recorded as having epilepsy. Also in the house were daughters Mary (31), Lizzie (23) and Margaret (20), for whom no occupations are recorded. All the siblings were unmarried. All occupants were Roman Catholic, could read and write and all came from County Galway. No language proficiency is given except for the head Eliza Earls who is recorded as speaking both Irish and English. The house is described as 2nd class, with stone or brick walls, a slated roof and had 2 rooms and 4 windows. There were 3 outbuildings consisting of a cowhouse, barn and stable.

 

House 9: Molloy

The head of the family was 62-year-old married shepherd, James Molloy who lived with his wife Mary (66) and family – son Michael (28), an agricultural labourer and daughters Maggie (29) and Katie (22). There are no occupations listed for any of the women and all three siblings were unmarried. All occupants were Roman Catholic, could read and write and all came from County Galway. The parents are recorded as being able to speak both English and Irish. The house was 2nd class with stone or brick walls, slated roof and had 2 rooms and 3 windows. There were 3 outbuildings – a cow-house, piggery and barn. The landowner is recorded as Patrick Raftery.

 

House 10: Pritchard/Agnes[1]

The head of the house was Walter Pritchard (27), a married farmer who lived with his wife Kate (26). They had been married for 2 years and had no children. Also in the house was lodger Thomas Agnes (see note), a 35-year-old unmarried agricultural labourer. All the occupants were Roman Catholic, could read and write and all came from County Galway. No language proficiency is recorded for any occupant and Walter Pritchard was also the landowner. The house was 2nd class with brick or stone walls, slated roof and had 2 rooms and 2 windows. There were 2 outbuildings – a stable and a cow-house.

 

House 11: Kelly

The sole occupant of this house was 55-year-old Joseph Kelly, an unmarried farmer. He was Roman Catholic, could read and write and came from County Galway. The house is described as 2nd class with stone or brick walls, a slated roof and had 2 rooms and 2 windows. Joseph Kelly was also the landholder and he signed the census form using his mark which was witnessed by constable Kyne.

 

House 12: uninhabited – no other details

 

1901 Census

Overview of townland

There were 12 houses in total in this townland, all of which were built and are recorded as private dwellings. All houses had stone or brick walls, and 10 had roofs of slate, iron or tiles whilst dwelling numbers one and six were thatched. All dwellings were recorded as 2nd class with the exception of house number 2 (Richard Kelly) whish was recorded as 1st class and 3rd class house number 6, (John Quinn). There was a total of 78 people living in the townland of which 42 were male and 36 were female. All were Roman Catholics. The heads of the households were also the landholders with the exceptions of houses 8, 9, 10 and 11 where the land owner of no’s 8,9 and 10 is given as Richard Kelly while Patrick Raftery of Carrowmore is listed as being the landowner of number 11. There was a total of 56 out buildings listed for the townland.

 

House 1: Kelly/Canning

The head of the household was Maria Kelly, a 55-year-old widowed farmer who lived with her sons William (34), David (30) and Peter (27). All three brothers were described as unmarried farmer’s sons. Also in the house was Maria Kelly’s niece, Bridget Canning a 20-year-old unmarried housekeeper. visitor. All the occupants were Roman Catholic, all could read and write and everyone was from County Galway. There is no language proficiency recorded for anyone. The house is described as a 2nd class private dwelling with walls of stone or brick and a roof of thatch or wood and had 4 rooms and 4 windows. The were 6 outbuildings.

 

House 2: Kelly

The head of the household was Richard Kelly, a 60-year-old married farmer who lived with his wife Ester (50) and family – their unmarried sons – John (22), Thomas (21) and Richard (19). Their occupations are given as ‘farming’. Also in the house was Mary Kelly, the 31-year-old unmarried sister of Richard Kelly Snr. She is described as ‘dumb’. All the occupants were Roman Catholic, could read and write and all came from County Galway. There is no language proficiency recorded for anyone. The house is described as a 1st class private dwelling with walls of stone or brick, a slate roof and had 4 rooms and 6 windows. There were 9 outbuildings.

 

House 3: Kelly/Murphy

The head of the household was Joseph Kelly, a 47-year-old married farmer who lived with his wife Charlotte (34), a housekeeper and their family. On census night the family consisted of daughters Lizzie (12), Mary (11), Charlotte (10), Kate (7), Margaret (3) and 2-year-old Delia as well as sons Joseph (8), Thomas (5), Robert (4) and 5 month old Michael (11). All the children are described as scholars except those under 5 and as such, all the older children could read and write except for 7-year-old Kate. There is no occupation listed for the eldest son, Joseph and himself and both parents could read only. Also in the house was Richard’s unmarried sister, Mary Kelly, a 40-year-old assistant housekeeper and two domestic servants – 20-year-old Kate Kelly and Tom Murphy, (40) both unmarried. All the occupants were Roman Catholic and all came from County Galway. There is no language proficiency recorded for anyone. The house is described as a 2nd class private dwelling with walls of stone or brick and a slated roof. There were 11 outbuildings.

 

House 4: Glynn/Clarke

The head of this household was Ellen Glynn, a 60-year-old widowed farmer. Also in the house were her farmer son James (35) and daughter-in-law Mary (30), a housekeeper, as well as her grandchildren Michael (6), and Ellen (4). Also present was boarder Nora Clarke, a 28-year-old unmarried assistant housekeeper. All the occupants were Roman Catholic, could read and write (except for the children) and all originated in County Galway. Ellen Glynn is recorded as speaking both English and Irish but the is no language details recorded for the others. The house was 2nd class with stone walls, a slate roof and had 3 rooms and 2 windows. There were 5 outbuildings.

 

House 5: Neill

The head of the family was 45-year-old widow Ellen Neill. She shared the house with her sons Patrick (14), a cook, Michael (12 and Henry (8), both scholars as her daughters 15-year-old Bridget and Mary (10). All the occupants were Roman Catholic, could read and write and came from County Galway. Everyone spoke English and head of family Ellen spoke both English and Irish. The house was 2nd class and had stone walls and a slate roof as well as 2 rooms and 2 windows. The family had 4 outbuildings. consisting of a stable, cow-house, piggery and a fowl-house.

 

House 6: Quinn

The head of the household was John Quinn (68), a widowed farmer and gamekeeper. He lived with his son Patrick (36), farmer and daughter-in-law, Maria (30). Also in the house were John’s grandchildren – Bridget (6), a scholar, Esther (4), John (3) and Michael, 9 months. All the occupants were Roman Catholic and all originated in County Galway. The adults all could read and write and the eldest child read only. Head of the household spoke both Irish and English. The house was 3rd class with stone walls, a thatched roof, 2 rooms and 2 windows. There were 5 outbuildings.

 

 House 7: Earls

The head of the household was Thomas Earls, a 54-year-old married farmer who lived with his wife Eliza (49), a housekeeper and their family – sons Willie (21), a gardener, Thomas (19), a painter, Patrick (17), a labourer, Francis (13), Joseph (8) and Michael (3), all scholars. Also in the house were daughters Mary A. (24), Delia (22), Lizzie (15) and Maggie (11). There are no occupations given for the eldest 2 daughters while the younger 2 are recorded as schoolgirl and scholar. All the siblings were unmarried. All occupants were Roman Catholic, could read and write (except 3-year-old Michael who could read only) and all came from County Galway. The house is described as 2nd class, with stone or brick walls, a slated roof and had 4 rooms and 2 windows. There were 3 outbuildings.

 

House 8: Kelly

Forty-year-old Joseph Kelly, an unmarried farmer, was the sole occupant of this house. He was Roman Catholic, could read and write and came from County Galway. The house is described as 2nd class with stone or brick walls, a slated roof and had 2 rooms and 2 windows. There were no outbuildings and the landholder is recorded as Richard Kelly.

 

House 9: McDonagh

The head of this household was Patrick McDonagh, a 45-year-old married herd. He lived with his wife Mary (40), a housekeeper. The family consisted of sons Michael (19), Richard (17), Patrick (15) – farm labourers – as well as John (12), Thomas (8) and 14-year-old daughter, Margaret – scholars. All the occupants were Roman Catholic and came from County Galway. All could read and write with the exception of Patrick Senior and son Richard. The house was 2nd class with stone or brick walls and a slated roof. There were 6 outbuildings and the landowner is listed as Richard Kelly. The census form was signed by Patrick McDonagh using his mark which was witnessed by sergeant Wilson.

 

House 10: Blehan/Bellew

The head of the household is listed as married farm labourer, Michael Blehan aged 60. He lived with his wife Mary (55), a housekeeper. Also in the house was Ellen Bellew (23), an assistant housekeeper, son-in-law, John Bellew (29), a farm labourer and 2-year-old grandson, Patrick Bellew aged 2. Michael Blehan and his son-in-law were unable to read or write whereas both ladies could do both. All the occupants were Roman Catholic and came from County Galway. The house is described as 2nd class with stone or brick walls, a slate roof and had 2 rooms and 3 windows. The census form was signed by Michael Blehan using his mark which was witnessed by sergeant Wilson. There were 2 outbuildings recorded and the landowner was Richard Kelly.

 

 

House 11: Molloy

The head of the family was 58-year-old married shepherd, James Molloy who lived with his wife Mary (53) and family – unmarried sons James (20) and Michael (17), both farm labourers and daughters Annie (14) and Katie (12), both scholars. All occupants were Roman Catholic, came from County Galway and with the exception of wife Mary, all could read and write. Both parents are recorded as being able to speak both English and Irish. The house was 2nd class with stone or brick walls, slated roof and had 2 rooms and 3 windows. There were 4 outbuildings and the landowner is recorded as Patrick Raftery.

 

House 12: Norton /Kerrigan

The head of the family was Catherine Norton, a widowed farmer aged 50 and her unmarried daughters Ellen (23) and Catherine (16) both laundresses. Also in the house was Catherine’s 40-year-old unmarried sister Mary Kerrigan for whom no occupation is listed. All the occupants were Roman Catholic, came from County Galway and all could read and write. Catherine Norton, the elder, is described as speaking both English and Irish.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[1] Transcribed as Agnes but is clearly Hynes.

This page was added on 25/11/2019.

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