Corskeagh Daly

Cull Sgeach

Mike Kelly/Galway Rural Development

Corskeagh Daly/ Cull Sgeach                                                         Irish Grid: M 64273 34135

  

Author: Mike Kelly/Galway Rural Development

 

Corskeagh Daly is a townland in the Civil Parish of Ballymacward in the barony of Tiaquin and the County of Galway.

 

Description:

 

Is the property of James Daly, Esq. by deed for ever. It contains 136a. 2r. 38p. The greater part of which is under sheep walks. It is flat and dry, but of bad description. Pays for County Cess £5. 4s. 9½d.

 

Situation:

 

Corskeagh lies in the South West of this parish in the barony of Tiaquin, bounded by Gurtnahultia, Kinreask and Curskeagh Trench in said barony and by Moyarwood n the barony of Kilconnel, in this parish by Doughloon and Calterbreedy in the parish of Killimer and by Shanballard and Shanballeaspul in the parish of Cloonkeen, in the barony of Tiaquin.

 

This is a list of townlands that share a border with Corskeagh Daly.

 

Census of Ireland (1821- 1911)

The first full population census of Ireland was taken in 1821 and the first four Irish censuses were arranged by county, barony, civil parish and townland.

 

1821: Only some fragments for small parts of county Galway survive. There are no records     for Ballymacward.

1831: The only surviving records are from Counties Antrim and Derry.

1841: There are no surviving records for County Galway.

1851:   There are no surviving records for County Galway.

1861: Census records for 1861 and 1871 were deliberately destroyed by the government

1881: The records for 1881 and 1891 were pulped as waster paper during the shortages of World War I.

1901:   Full Census records are available   See below.

1911:   Full Census records are available   See below.

 

1911 Census

Overview of townland

There were 2 houses in total in this townland in 1911 all of which were built and are recorded as private dwellings. Both houses had stone or brick walls, and each roofs of thatch, wood or other perishable material. Both dwellings were recorded as 2nd class. There was a total of 18 people living in the townland of which 12 were male and 6 were female. All were Roman Catholics.

 

House 1: Naughton

The head of the household was Peter Naughton, a 47-year-old married farmer who lived with his wife, Bridget (37) and their family. They had been married for 13 years and had 9 children, all of whom were still living. The sons were Malachy (15), Patrick (11), John (10), Peter (8), William (7) all described as scholars and Thomas (5), Martin (3) and James (1). Their daughter was 12-year-old Mary also a scholar. They were all Roman Catholic, came from County Galway and all could read and write with the exception of the three youngest children. The all are recorded as speaking both English and Irish except the three youngest. The house is described as a 2nd class private dwelling with 2 rooms and 3 windows. The walls were stone or brick and the roof was thatched. The head of the household was also the landowner.

 

House 2: Ruane

The head of the household is recorded as Bridget Ruane; a 64-year-old widow whose occupation is given as a herd. She lived with her sons William (45), Patrick (39) and Martin (20) whose occupations are listed as herd’s sons as well as her daughters Catherine (26), Margaret (24) and 22-year-old Annie. No occupations are listed for the daughters and all the siblings were unmarried. All occupants were Roman Catholic and all came from County Galway. All could read and write with exception of the eldest son William. The house is described as a 2nd class private dwelling with 2 rooms and 3 windows. The walls were made of stone or brick and the roof was thatched. The landowner is recorded as Colonel Daly of Dunsandle.

 

 

1901 Census (recorded as Govskeagh Daly)

Overview of townland

There were 2 houses in total in this townland in 1901 both of which were built and recorded as private dwellings. Both houses had stone or brick walls, and each roof was of thatch, wood or other perishable material. Both dwellings were recorded as 2nd class. There was a total of 16 people living in the townland of which 7 were male and 9 were female. All were Roman Catholics.

 

House 1: Naughton

The head of the household was Mary Naughton, a 75-year-old widowed farmer She lived with her son Peter (34), a farmer and her daughter-in-law, Bridget (27). Also in the house were her grandchildren Malachy (5), Mary (2) and one-year-old Patrick. They were all Roman Catholic, came from County Galway and the three adults could read and write as well as speaking both English and Irish. The house is described as a 2nd class private dwelling with 2 rooms and 3 windows. The walls were stone or brick and the roof was thatched. The head of the household was also the landowner.

 

House 2: Noone/Ruane

The head of the household is recorded as Ellen Noone, an 85-year-old widowed housekeeper. She lived with her daughter Bridget Ruane (45), a housekeeper, her son-in-law Patrick Ruane, a 72 year shepherds, her grandsons William, (32), Patrick (25) whose occupations are listed as herd’s sons and Martin Ruane (10) who is listed as a scholar. Also in the house were her grand-daughters Bedelia (20), described as a shepherd’s daughter and Kate (16), Margaret (14) and 12-year-old Anne, all scholars. All the siblings were unmarried. All occupants were Roman Catholic and all came from County Galway. All could read and write with exception of the head Ellen Noone and her eldest grandson William. The house is described as a 2nd class private dwelling with 2 rooms and 3 windows. The walls were made of stone or brick and the roof was thatched. The landowner is recorded as Patrick Raftery.

 

This page was added on 21/11/2019.

No Comments

Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this page!

Add a comment about this page

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *