Creeraun

Críthrán

Mike Kelly/Galway Rural Development

Creeraun/ Críthrán                                                Irish Grid: M 63332 35923

  

Author: Mike Kelly/Galway Rural Development

 

The townland of Creeraun is in the civil parish of Ballymacward, in the barony of

Kilconnell and the County of Galway.

 

Description:

 

Is the property of James Daly, Esq. who holds it under a deed for ever. It contains 244a. 2r. 20p. all of which is under Demesne about 40 acres of bog and 10 acres. Houses and roads are in good repair. It pays £9. 13. 7. County Cess

.

Situation:

 

Is situated in the western side of the parish in the barony of Tiaquin, bounded by Gortbrack, Kinreask, Gurtnahultra, Gurteen and Glannamwicka townland in this parish and by Killooaun in the parish of Cloonkeen in Tiaquin barony.

 

Townlands that share a border with this Creeraun.

  

O’Donovan’s Field Names 

Background

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books were published in 1862. John O’Donovan travelled throughout the Ireland in search of the Irish version of place-names. He had a special interest in local history research and so in addition to presenting forms of the name attached to each townland, O’Donovan and his associates provided information relating to land quality, crops and housing.  He also named archaeological and historical features and antiquities and man-made structures where possible.

Search : Creeraun

Tithe Applotments 

In order to determine the amount that they should pay in tithes to the Church of Ireland, the names of the occupiers and the size of their agricultural holdings, above one acre only, in each townland were recorded in the Title Applotment Books

Search: Creeraun

 

 

Griffith Valuation

The Primary Valuation of Ireland was a survey involving a detailed valuation of every taxable holding of agricultural or built property on the island of Ireland. It was completed between 1864-1865.

 

Search: Creeraun

 

Census of Ireland (1821- 1911)

The first full population census of Ireland was taken in 1821 and the first four Irish censuses were arranged by county, barony, civil parish and townland. Records for Galway do not survive for the years 1821-1851 and the 1861 and 1871 records were deliberately destroyed by the government. Due to paper shortages during World War I, the census records for 1881 and 1891 were pulped for waste paper.  Search:

 

Census of Ireland (1821- 1911)

The first full population census of Ireland was taken in 1821 and the first four Irish censuses were arranged by county, barony, civil parish and townland.

 

1821: Only some fragments for small parts of county Galway survive. There are no records     for Ballymacward.

1831: The only surviving records are from Counties Antrim and Derry.

1841: There are no surviving records for County Galway.

1851:   There are no surviving records for County Galway.

1861: Census records for 1861 and 1871 were deliberately destroyed by the government

1881: The records for 1881 and 1891 were pulped as waster paper during the shortages of World War I.

1901:   Full Census records are available   See below.

1911:   Full Census records are available   See below.

 

1911 Census

Overview of townland

There were 2 houses in total in this townland, both of which were built and are recorded as private dwellings. Both houses had stone or brick walls, and roofs of thatch, wood or other perishable material and both dwellings were recorded as 3rd class. There was a total of 5 people living in the townland of which there were 4 females and 1 male. All were Roman Catholics. Neither of the heads of the households were the landholders. There were six outbuildings consisting of a stable, cow-house, calf-house, a piggery and 2 fowl-houses.

 

House 1: Dempsey

The head of the household was Patrick Dempsey a 38-year-old married herd who lived with his wife, Mary (40) and their one-year-old daughter also named Mary. They had been married for 7 years and had 4 children, only 1 of which was still living. Patrick is described as not being able to read while wife Mary could read and write. There are no details of languages spoken. They were all Roman Catholic and came from County Galway. The census form was signed aby Patrick Dempsey using his mark which was witnessed by Constable Fitzpatrick. The house is described as a 3rd class private dwelling with 2 rooms and 1 window. The walls were stone or brick and the roof was thatched. The landowner is listed as James Kyne of Ballyglass. There were five outbuildings consisting of a stable, cow-house, calf-house, a piggery and a fowl-house.

 

House 2: Gormally/Moran

The head of the household is recorded as Margaret Gormally; a 55-year-old widow whose occupation is given as a washer woman. She is described as illiterate but could speak both English and Irish. On the night of the census there was a visitor, Margaret Moran, a ten-year-old scholar. Both were Roman Catholic and both came from County Galway. The house is described as a 3rd class private dwelling with 1 room and 1 window. The walls were made of stone or brick and the roof was thatched. The landowner is named as Thomas Griffin of Gortnacross. The only outbuilding was a fowl-house.

 

1901 Census

Overview of townland

There were only 2 houses in this townland, both of which were built and are recorded as private dwellings. Both houses had stone or brick walls, and roofs of thatch, wood or other perishable material and both dwellings were recorded as 4th and 3rd class respectively There were a total of 8 people living in the townland of which 4 were male and 4 were female. All were Roman Catholics. The heads of the households were not the landholders.

 

House 1: Gormally

The head of the household is recorded as Margaret Gormally, a 36-year-old whose occupation is given as a washer woman. She is described as not being able to read but could speak both English and Irish. Also in the house was her sister Bridget Gormally (18), a housekeeper who could read and write and speak both English and Irish. Both women were unmarried, Roman Catholic and both came from County Galway. The house is described as a 4th class private dwelling with 1 room and no windows. The walls were made of stone or brick and the roof was thatched. The landowner is named as James Kyne.

 

House 2: Dempsey

The head of the household was Hanor[1] Dempsey a 53-year-old widow and housekeeper. Also in the house were her sons Patrick (30), William (25), Michael (22) and Thomas (15) as well as 19-year-old daughter, Mary. The occupations of the eldest two sons are given as shepherd while Michael is an agricultural labourer, Thomas a scholar and daughter Mary described as a housekeeper. All the siblings were unmarried and all could read and write with the exception of Patrick and William. The head of the household, Hanna and the eldest three siblings are shown as speaking both English and Irish. All the occupants were Roman Catholic and came from County Galway. The census form was signed by Patrick Dempsey using his mark which was witnessed by Constable Fitzpatrick. The house is described as a 3rd class private dwelling with 2 rooms and 2 windows. The walls were stone or brick and the roof was thatched. The landowner is listed as James Kyne.

 

 

 

General Registry of Office (GRO) Records

Civil Registry Birth: (1864-1915) The official State records of births in Ireland.

 

Civil Registry Marriage: (1864-1940) The official State records of marriage in Ireland

 

Civil Registry Death: (1864-1960) The official State records of death in Ireland

 

Search https://www.irishgenealogy.ie/en/

 

 

 

 

 

[1] Possibly Honor ?

This page was added on 24/11/2019.

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