Killaghaun

An Cilleachán

Roger Harrison

Irish Grid: M 66912 40639

 

The townland of Killaghaun is in the civil parish of Ballymacward, in the barony of

Kilconnell and the County of Galway.

 

Description:

(John O’Donovan 1806-1861)

This townland is the property of John Blakeny, Esq. who holds it under a deed for ever. It is a flat country. The North East part is wet bog, the rest arable and of a good quality. The houses and roads are in good repair. It is situated about 6 miles West of Ahascragh. Amount of County Cess is £2. 15s. 9d.

 

Situation:

(John O’Donovan 1806-1861)

Is situated in the northern part of the parish in the barony of Tiaquin, bounded by Ashfield, Lisheen, Esker, Lissloughlin and Moneen townlands in same barony.

 

This is a list of townlands that share a border with Killaghaun.

 

 

Census of Ireland (1821- 1911)

The first full population census of Ireland was taken in 1821 and the first four Irish censuses were arranged by county, barony, civil parish and townland.

 

1821: Only some fragments for small parts of county Galway survive. There are no records     for Ballymacward.

1831: The only surviving records are from Counties Antrim and Derry.

1841: There are no surviving records for County Galway.

1851:   There are no surviving records for County Galway.

1861: Census records for 1861 and 1871 were deliberately destroyed by the government

1881: The records for 1881 and 1891 were pulped as waster paper during the shortages of World War I.

1901: Full Census records are available   See below.

1911:   Full Census records are available   See below.

 

1911 Census

Overview of the townland

The 1911 census shows that there were a total of 7 houses in the townland and that they were all occupied and were listed as being private dwellings. They were all built of stone, brick or concrete walls and houses 2 and 5 had slate, iron or tiled roofs and the others all had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. They were all listed as being 2nd class dwellings. Houses 1, 3 and 6 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 3 windows in the front, houses 4, 5 and 7 had between 2 and 4 rooms and had 4 windows in the front and house 2 had 5 or 6 rooms and 4 windows. The out-offices and farm-steadings return (form B.2) shows that there were a total of 27 out buildings in the townland and they consisted of 7 stables, 7 cow houses, 2 calf houses, 6 piggeries, a fowl house, 3 barns and 2 sheds. The enumerator’s abstract return (form N) shows that there were a total of 44 people listed in the townland at the time of the census and they consisted of 21 males and 23 females. The enumerator for the area was John Gallagher.

 

House 1: ONeill

The head of the first family in Killaghaun was the widow Bridget (75) and she shared the house with her son John (37). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke Irish and English but only John could read and write. Bridget was listed as a farmer and John was a farmer’s son. The house was a 2nd class dwelling and with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable, cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn. Bridget ONeill was the land holder.

 

House 2: ONeill / Hannon / Kenny / Petty

The widow Hannah (60) was the head of this family and she shared the house with her son Hugh (24), her brother, Patk Kenny (68), a servant Mary Petty (50) and a labourer, Mathew (sic) Hannon (49). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Hannah could speak Irish and English. Apart from Mary, they could all read and write. Hannah was a national school teacher, Hugh was a farmer, Mary was a servant and Mathew (sic) was a farm labourer. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 5 or 6 rooms and they had a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn. The landholder was Hannah ONeill.

 

House 3: Quinn / Loughnan

The head of this family was Martin (42) and he had been married to Annie (40) for 1 year and they had no children at that time. Also in the house was Annie’s father, John Loughnan (sic) (78). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Annie and John spoke Irish and English and only Martin and Annie could read and write. Martin was listed as being a farmer. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a shed. The landholder was a Martin Quinn.

 

House 4: Loughnane

The head of the family in house 4 was Bartly (42) and he had been married to Catherine (42) for 16 years and in that time they had had 7 children and all of those had survived. They lived with those 7 children and they were, John (16), Bridget (15), Timothy (13), Mary (11), Edward (9), Catherine (7) and Margaret (3). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Only Catherine (42) could speak Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others so that could indicate that they only spoke English. Apart from Margaret, they could all read and write. Bartley was a farmer, Margaret was a farmer’s daughter and the other children were all scholars. The house they all lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery and a barn. The landholder was Bartly Loughnane.

 

House 5: Tanian

The head of the Tanian family in house 5 was James (47) and he had been married to Bridget (36) for 15 years and they had had 7 children, all of whom had survived. They shared the house with those 7 children and they were, Mary (14), John (12), Delia (9), Margaret (7), Patrick (5), Julia (3) and Kathleen (10mths). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Apart from Julia and Kathleen they all spoke only English. Julia and Kathleen could read, Patrick could read only and the others could all read and write. James was a farmer and all the children, except Julia, were listed as being scholars. They all lived in a 2nd class house and they had between 2 and 4 rooms and they also had a stable, a cow house and a piggery. James Tanian was the landholder.

 

House 6: Jenkins

The head of this family was Patrick (70) and he had been married to Mary (59) for 38 years and they had had 10 children and 8 of those had survived. They shared the house with 3 of those children and they were, Maria (28), Michael (20) and Maggie (12). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick, Mary and Maria spoke Irish and English Patrick could not read, Mary could read only and the children could read and write. Patrick was listed as being a farmer, Michael was a farmer’s son and Maggie was a scholar. The house they all lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable, a cow house and a shed. The landholder was Patrick Jenkins.

 

House 7: Donohue

Martin (48) was the head of this family and he was married to Kate (50) and they had been married for 16 years and they had had 8 children and all had survived. They shared the house with Martin’s sister, Bridget (55) and their 8 children, Edward (14), Thomas (14), John (13), Martin (11), Margaret (10), Delia (8), Molly (6) and Michael (4). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. There was nothing entered under the language heading so that could indicate that they only spoke English. Apart from Michael, they could all read and write. Martin (48) was a farmer and all the children, apart from Michael, were scholars. The house they all shared was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms. They had a stable, a cow house, a calf house and a piggery. The landholder was Martin Donohue.

 

1901 Census

Overview of the townland

There were a total of 7 houses in Killaghaun in 1901 and they were all occupied and listed as being private dwellings. They were all constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and house 3 had slate, iron or tiles for roofing and the others had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. Houses 1 and 4 were 3rd class dwellings and the others were all 2nd class. House 1 had between 2 and 4 rooms and had 1 window in the front, house 4 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 2 windows, houses 2, 5, 6 and 7 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 3 windows and house 3 had 5 or 6 rooms and 5 windows in the front. There were a total of 22 out buildings consisting of 4 stables. 7 cow houses. 6 piggeries, 4 barns and a shed. There were also a total of 35 people in Killaghaun, 17 males and 18 females. The enumerator for the area was Const. John Kelly.

 

House 1: Jenkins

Patrick (50) was the head of the family in house 1 and he was married to Mary (45) and they lived with 4 of their children, Maria (14), Bridget (12), Michael (10) and Margaret (1). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic, although there was no place of birth for baby Margaret. Patrick and Mary spoke Irish and English and the children, apart from baby Margaret, spoke only English. Patrick and Margaret could not read, Mary could read only and the others could all read and write. Patrick was a farmer, Maria was a farmer’s daughter and Bridget and Michael were scholars. The house was a 3rd class dwelling between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a cow house and a piggery. Patrick Jenkins was the landholder.

 

House 2: Tanian

The head of this family was James (36) and he was married to Bridget (26) and they shared the house with 3 of their children, Mary (4), John (1) and Kate (6mths). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. James and Bridget spoke Irish and English and Mary and John spoke only English. James and Bridget could read and write and Mary could read only. James was listed as being a farmer. The house was a 2nd class house with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a barn and a shed. The landholder was James Tanian.

 

House 3: O’Neill / Pettit

The head of the family in house 3 was the widow Hannah (50) and she shared the house with 2 of her sons, Owen (17) and Hugh (13) and a servant, Mary Pettit (38). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Hannah spoke Irish and English and Owen was listed as speaking only English. Hannah, Owen and Hugh could read and write. Hannah was a national school teacher, Owen was a farmer, Hugh was a scholar and Mary was a general servant domestic. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 5 or 6 rooms and they had a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn. The landholder was Hannah O’Neill.

 

House 4: Loughnan (sic)

The widower John (68) was listed as being the head of the family and he lived with his daughter Annie (29). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke both Irish and English but only Annie could read and write. John was listed as being a farmer and Annie was a farmer’s daughter. The house they lived in was a 3rd class house with between 2 and 4 rooms. They also had a cow house and a piggery. The landholder was listed as John Loughnane.

 

House 5: Loughnane / Rooney

The head of this family was Bartly (30) and he was married to Catherine (29) and they shared the house with 4 of their children, John (6), Bridget (5), Timothy (4) and Mary (1) and also in the house at that time was Catherine’s father, Timothy Rooney (57). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Timothy Rooney spoke Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others, which could indicate that they only spoke English. Mary and Timothy Rooney could not read, Bridget and Timothy (4) could read only and the others could all read and write. Bartly was a farmer, Timothy Rooney was a farm labourer and John, Bridget and Timothy (4) were scholars. The house was a 2nd class dwelling and they had between 2 and 4 rooms and they also had a stable and a cow house. Bartly Loughnane was the landholder.

 

House 6: O Neill

The head of this family was the widow Bridget (60) and she shared the house with her son John (26). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They both spoke Irish and English but only John could read and write. Bridget was a farmer and John was listed as being a farmer’s son. The house they shared was a 2nd class dwelling with between 2 and 4 rooms and they had a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn. The landholder was listed as being Bridget Neill (sic)

 

House 7: Donohoe / Leech

The head of the last family in Killaghaun was Martin (34) who was married to Katie (33) and they shared the house with 5 of their children, Edward (5), Thomas (4), John (3), Martin (1) and Margaret (2mths), Martin’s sister Bridget (36) and Katie’s sister Bridget Leech (18). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Only Martin (34), Katie, Bridget (36) and Bridget (18) could read and write. Martin (34) was a shepherd and Bridget (36) and Bridget (18) were listed as being farm labourers. The house they all lived in was a 2nd class dwelling and they had between 2 and 4 rooms and also had cow house, a piggery and a barn. The landholder was listed as being James Johnston.

 

Griffith’s Valuation

James Blake owned a herd’s house and offices on 161 acres, 3 roods and 10 perches of land that had an annual ratable valuation of £110 for the land and 15s for the buildings, he also had a vacant house with an annual ratable valuation of 15s. James Dempsey leased a house and offices on 4 acres and 8 perches of land from James Blake for £2 5s for the land and 15s for the buildings, Peter Tanyn leased a house and offices on 6 acres, 2 roods and 20 perches of land from James Blake for £4 5s for the land and 10s for the buildings. Michael Dolan leased 2 plots form James Blake, the first being 2 acres, 1 rood and 5 perches of land for £1 and the second was a house and offices on 3acres, 3 roods and 16 perches of land for £2 5s for the land and 10s for the buildings. John Neill leased a house and offices on 5 acres and 15 perches of land from James Blake for £2 5s for the land and 15s for the buildings. Patrick and John Loftus jointly leased 2 tenements for James Blake, a house and offices on 6 acres, 2 roods and 10 perches of land for which they paid £4 for the land and 10s each for the buildings and 3 acres, 2 roods and 26 perches of land that they paid £2 between them for. There was a vacant house belonging to Patrick and John Loftus that had an annual ratable valuation of 5s. William Collins leased a house and offices on 3 acres and 13 perches of land from James Blake for £1 15s for the land and 15s for buildings. Patrick Burke leased a house and offices on 5 acres, 3 roods and 36 perches of land form James Blake for £3 10s for the land and 15s for the buildings, John McDonough leased a house and offices on 2 acres, 3 roods and 32 perches of land for £1 15s for the land and 10s for the buildings and Mary Loughnan (sic) leased a house and offices 3 acres and 34 perches of land from James Blake for £1 15s for the land and 10s for the buildings.

This page was added on 26/02/2020.

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