Baunogues

Na Bánóga

Mike Kelly/Galway Rural Development

Baunogues / Na Bánóga     Irish Grid M 66300 42317

  

Author: Mike Kelly/Galway Rural Development

 

The townland of Baunogues is in the civil parish of Ballymacward, in the barony of

Tiaquin and the County of Galway.

 

Situation:

Lies in the northern extremity of this parish in the barony of Tiaquin, bounded by Hundred Acres, Ashfield and Moyur townlands in this parish, by Aughanaghel, Ballynasooragh Ooghter and Ballynasooragh Eeghter in the parish of Killascobe and by Lehanagh in the parish of Killosolan, all in said barony.

This is a list of townlands that share a border with this townland.

 

Description:

This townland is the property of John H. Blakeny, Esq. who holds it under a deed for ever. It is flat and dry of middling quality. It is situated in the North of this parish. Houses in bad repair. It contains a.r.p. Amount of County Cess is £4. 13s.

 

Census of Ireland (1821- 1911)

The first full population census of Ireland was taken in 1821 and the first four Irish censuses were arranged by county, barony, civil parish and townland.

 

1821: Only some fragments for small parts of county Galway survive. There are no records     for Ballymacward.

1831: The only surviving records are from Counties Antrim and Derry.

1841: There are no surviving records for County Galway.

1851:   There are no surviving records for County Galway.

1861: Census records for 1861 and 1871 were deliberately destroyed by the government

1881: The records for 1881 and 1891 were pulped as waster paper during the shortages of World War I.

1901:   Full Census records are available   See below.

1911:   Full Census records are available   See below.

 

 

1911 Census

Overview of townland

There were 12 houses in total in this townland, all of which were built and are recorded as private dwellings with only one unoccupied. All houses had stone or brick walls, 9 had roofs of slate, iron or tiles whilst dwelling numbers five and six were thatched. All dwellings were recorded as 2nd class with the exception of numbers 1 and 10 which were 3rd class. There were a total of 53 people living in the townland of which 29 were male and 24 were female. All were Roman Catholics. The heads of the households were also the landholders. There was a total of 40 out buildings listed for the townland which comprised of 6 stables, 10 cow houses, 4 calf houses, 8 piggeries, 5 fowl houses, 6 barns and one workshop.

 

House 1: Duane

The head of the household was, a 72-year-old married farmer, Patrick Duane who lived with his wife Bridget (67) and family. They had been married for 40 years and had aa children, 9 of whom were still living. The household consisted of daughters Delia (28), Anne (22) and Katie (20), listed as farmer’s daughters as well as sons Patrick (36), Bernard (26), and Thomas (24), all farmer’s sons. All six siblings were unmarried. All the occupants were Roman Catholic, all could read and write and everyone was from County Galway. Both parents are recorded as speaking both English and Irish and the children English only. There is no language proficiency recorded for anyone. The house is described as a 3rd class private dwelling with walls of stone or brick and a roof of thatch or wood and had 2 rooms and 2 windows. There were 3 outbuildings consisting of a piggery, a fowl-house and a workshop.

 

House 2: Brennan

The head of the household was Mary Brennan, a 72-year-old widowed farmer who could not read nor write but spoke both Irish and English. She lived with her unmarried daughter, Winifred (30) – a farmer’s and son John (28), a farmer’s son, also single. Both siblings could read and write and Winifred spoke both Irish and English while her brother is recorded as speaking English only. All the occupants were Roman Catholic and all came from County Galway. The house is described as a 2nd class private dwelling with walls of stone or brick, a thatched roof and had 2 rooms and 3 windows. There were 4 outbuildings consisting of a cow-house, calf-house, piggery and a barn. The census form was signed by Mary Brennan using her mark which was witnessed by constable John Gallagher.

 

House 3: Brennan

The head of the household was Bridget Brennan, a 55-year-old widowed farmer who lived with her unmarried daughter Margaret (17). Both occupants were Roman Catholic, could read and write and both originated in County Galway. There is no language proficiency recorded for either woman. The house is described as a 2nd class private dwelling with walls of stone or brick and a thatched roof with 2 rooms and 3 windows. There were 3 outbuildings consisting of a cow-house, a calf-house and a piggery.

 

House 4: Bellew/Naughton

The head of the household is listed as unmarried farmer, Patrick Bellew aged 76Also in the house was his 64-year-old widowed sister, Mary Bellew and nephews Patrick (39) and Frank (31) Bellew and 56-year-old John Naughton. All three nephews were unmarried. He lived with his wife Ellie (33) and their family. All the occupants were Roman Catholic and all came from County Galway. Everyone could read and write except John Naughton who could read only. Patrick Senior, sister Mary and nephew John are recorded as speaking both Irish and English. The house is described as 2nd class with stone or brick walls, a thatch roof and had 2 rooms and 3 windows. There were 6 outbuildings recorded consisting of 2 stables, 2 cow-houses, a piggery and a barn.

 

House 5: Bellew

The head of this household was Margaret Bellew, a 74-year-old widowed farmer. She lived with her unmarried daughters Bridget (35) and Ellen (33), for whom no occupations are given and her son Bernard (20), a farmer’s son and also single. Also in the house was Margaret Bellew’s 70-year-old unmarried brother John Kerr. All the occupants were Roman Catholic, all could read and write (except head, Margaret, who could read only) and all originated in County Galway. Margaret, her daughter Bridget and brother John Kerr are recorded as speaking both Irish and English. The house was 2nd class with stone walls, a slate roof and had 2 rooms and 2 windows. There were 4 outbuildings – a stable, a cow-house, a piggery and a barn. The census form was signed by Margaret Bellew using her mark and was witnessed by constable Gallagher.

 

House 6: Naughton

The head of the family was 48-year-old widowed farmer, Michael Naughton who could speak both Irish and English but could not read*. He shared the house with his son Thomas (10), a farmer’s son and daughters Mary (9), Maggie (7) and 5-year-old Kate all described as farmer’s daughters. All the occupants were Roman Catholic, could read and write* and came from County Galway. The house was 2nd class and had stone walls and a slate roof as well as 2 rooms and 3 windows. The family had 4only one outbuilding – a cow-house.

 

House 7: Harrison

The head of the household was Thomas Harrison, a married farmer aged 73. He lived with his wife, Maria (41) who had Mary (50) and family. They had been married for 25 years and had 8 children, all still living. In the house were sons John (29), James (20), Robert (14) and 10-year-old Thomas all listed as farmer’s sons as well as farmer’s daughters, Mary Kate (17) and 12-year-old Margaret. All the occupants were Roman Catholic and all originated in County Galway. With the exception of wife Mary Harrison, all could read and write and both parents spoke English and Irish. The house was 2nd class with stone walls, a thatched roof, 2 rooms and 3 windows. The 4 outbuildings were a stable, cow-house, piggery and a barn.

 

House 8: Cheevers

The head of the household was Edward Cheevers, a 34-year-old married farmer living with his wife Bridget (25) and family. They had been married for 2 years and had 2 children, both still living – daughters Nonie (1) and 6 month old Mary. Also in the house were Edward’s father also Edward, a 75-year-old widower and unmarried brother James Cheevers aged 40. All occupants were Roman Catholic, could read and write (except the 2 infants) and all came from County Galway. No language proficiency is given except for wife Bridget and father Edward who are both recorded as speaking both Irish and English. The house is described as 2nd class, with stone or brick walls, a thatched roof and had 2 rooms and 3 windows. There were 6 outbuildings consisting of a stable, cowhouse, calf-house, piggery, fowl-house and a barn.

 

House 9: Mannion

The head of the family was 62-year-old widowed farmer, Celia Mannion who lived with her unmarried sons – Martin (24), William (21) who were both farmer’s sons and 15-year-old scholar James. All occupants were Roman Catholic, could read and write and all came from County Galway. The head of the family, Celia, is recorded as being able to speak both English and Irish. The house was 2nd class with stone or brick walls, thatched roof and had 2 rooms and 3 windows. There were 6 outbuildings – a stable, cow-house, calf-house, piggery fowl-house and a barn.

 

House 10: Finegan

The head of the house was Patrick Finegan (79), a widowed agricultural labourer who lived with his unmarried son, John aged 40. Both of them were Roman Catholic, came from County Galway and spoke both Irish and English. Patrick Finegan could not read or write but son John could do both. The house was 3rd class with brick or stone walls, thatched roof and had 2 rooms and 2 windows. There was one outbuilding – a fowl-house. The census form was signed by Patrick Finegan using his mark and witnessed by John Gallagher.

 

House 11: Broderick

The head of the household was listed as Hanna Broderick, a 36-year-old married farmer. She had been married for 11 years and had 5 children all still living. She could read and write, spoke both English and Irish and came from County Kerry. Also in the house were her children Thomas (7), Catherine (5), both scholars, John (4) and 2-year-old Patrick Joseph. All the children originated in America and the eldest 2 could read and write. All occupants were Roman Catholic. The house is described as 2nd class with stone or brick walls, a slated roof and had 2 rooms and 2 windows. There were 2 outbuildings recorded – a cow-house and a fowl-house.

 

House 12: uninhabited – built and private but no other details.

 

 1901 Census

Overview of townland

There were 11 houses in total in this townland, all of which were built and are recorded as private dwellings. All houses had stone or brick walls, and all had roofs of thatch or wood, except dwelling number 4 which was slated. Seven dwellings were recorded as 2nd class and four were 3rd class. There was a total of 58 people living in the townland of which 33 were male and 25 were female. All were Roman Catholics. The heads of the households were also the landholders. There were a total of 36 outbuildings listed for the townland consisting of 7 stables, 8 cow-houses, 1 calf-house, 8 piggeries, 6 barns, 1 workshop and 5 sheds.

 

 House 1: Bellew/Naughton

The head of the household was 42-year-old widowed farmer Bridget Bellew. Also in the 3rd class house were 2 lodgers – 65-year-old married agricultural labourer, Edward Naughton and Mary Naughton (60), described as a ‘mendicant’. Head of the household, Bridget Bellew could not read or write but spoke both Irish and English, Mary Naughton could read only and Edward Naughton could do both and could also speak both Irish and English. All the occupants were Roman Catholic and came from County Galway. The house had walls of stone or brick and a thatched roof, with 2 rooms and 2 windows and there was one outbuilding – a stable. The census form was signed by Bridget Bellew using her mark which was witnessed by John Kelly.

 

 

House 2: Devane[1]

The head of the household was, a 64-year-old married master carpenter, Patrick Duane who lived with his wife Bridget (50) and family. The household consisted of daughters Margaret (16), Annie (12) and Kate (10), all listed as scholars as well as sons Patrick (27), Bernard (18), both carpenters and 14-year-old scholar, Thomas. All the siblings were unmarried. All the occupants were Roman Catholic, all could read and write and everyone was from County Galway. Both parents are recorded as speaking both English and Irish with no language details recorded for the children. The house is described as a 2nd class private dwelling with walls of stone or brick and a roof of thatch or wood and had 2 rooms and 4 windows. There were 3 outbuildings consisting of a cowhouse, piggery, and a workshop.

 

House 3: Harrison/Beegan

The head of the household was Thomas Harrison, a married farmer aged 63. He lived with his wife, Mary (40), six sons and 2 daughters. The sons were John (17), a farmer’s son, Patrick (14), Michael (13), James (10), Richard (9) and 3-year-old Robert and daughters Mary Kate (5) and Margaret (1). All the sons except 3-year-old Robert are listed as scholars. Also in the house was 17-year-old unmarried farm servant, Patrick Beegan. All the occupants were Roman Catholic and all originated in County Galway. With the exception of wife, Mary Harrison and the 3 youngest children, all could read and write and both parents are recorded as being able to speak both English and Irish. The house was 2nd class with stone walls, a thatched roof, 2 rooms and 3 windows. The 5 outbuildings were a stable, cow-house, piggery, a barn and a shed.

 

House 4: Naughton

The head of the family was 38-year-old married farmer, Michael Naughton who could speak both Irish and English but could not read. He shared the house with his wife Bridget (25), son Thomas (11) and his unmarried sister Honoria (27). All the occupants were Roman Catholic, and all came from County Galway. None of the occupants could read or write except wife Bridget. There is no language proficiency recorded for anyone other than head, Michael Naughton. The house was 2nd class and had stone walls and a slate roof as well as 2 rooms and 2 windows. The family had only one outbuilding – a stable. The census form was signed by Michael Naughton using his mark which was witnessed by constable John Kelly.

 

House 5: Brennan

The head of the household was Mary Brennan, a 60-year-old widowed farmer who could not read but spoke both Irish and English. She lived with her unmarried daughter, Winifred (23) – a farmer’s daughter and son John (19), a farmer’s son, also single. Both siblings could read and write and there is no language proficiency recorded for either. All the occupants were Roman Catholic and all came from County Galway. The house is described as a 2nd class private dwelling with walls of stone or brick, a thatched roof and had 2 rooms and 3 windows. There were 3 outbuildings consisting of a cow-house, a piggery and a barn.

 

House 6: Brennan

The head of the household was Bridget Brennan, a 44-year-old widowed farmer who lived with her children – Michael (10) and 7-year-old Mary, both described as scholars. All the occupants were Roman Catholic, and originated in County Galway. Both Bridget and her son could read and write and Bridget spoke both English and Irish. There is no language proficiency recorded for either child. The house is described as a 3rd class private dwelling with walls of stone or brick and a thatched roof with 2 rooms and 2 windows. The family had one outbuilding – a cowhouse.

 

House 7: Bellew

The head of this household was Margaret Bellew, a widowed farmer aged 65. She lived with her daughters Bridget (29) and Ellen (25), whose no occupations are given as farmer’s daughters and her son Bernard (22), a farmer’s son. All three siblings were unmarried. Also in the house was Margaret Bellew’s 62 year old unmarried brother John Carr,[2] a farm servant. All the occupants were Roman Catholic, all could read and write (except the head, Margaret and daughter Bridget who could read only) and all originated in County Galway. The house was 2nd class with stone walls, a thatched roof and had 2 rooms and 3 windows. There were 5 outbuildings – a stable, a cow-house, a piggery, barn and a shed. The census form was signed by Margaret Bellew using her mark and was witnessed by constable John Kelly.

House 8: Bellew/Naughton

The head of the household is listed as unmarried farmer, Patrick Bellew aged 67. Also in the house was his married sister-in-law, Mary Bellew, aged 50 and nephew Patrick Bellew (36) and niece Kate Bellew (23), both single and whose occupations are recorded as farmer’s son and farmer’s daughter respectively. Also in the house was Patrick Bellew’s unmarried cousin 44-year-old John Naughton, a farm servant. All the occupants were Roman Catholic and all came from County Galway. Everyone could read and write except John Naughton who could read only. There is no language proficiency recorded for any of the occupants. The house is described as 2nd class with stone or brick walls, a thatch roof and had 2 rooms and 3 windows. There were 5 outbuildings recorded consisting of a stable, cow-house, piggery, barn and a shed.

 

House 9: Finegan

The head of the house was Patrick Finegan (68), a widowed agricultural labourer who lived with his unmarried son, John aged 35 and also an agricultural labourer. Both of them were Roman Catholic, came from County Galway and spoke both Irish and English. Only son John could read and write. The house was 3rd class with brick or stone walls, thatched roof and had 2 rooms and 2 windows. There was one outbuilding – a piggery. The census form was signed by Patrick Finegan using his mark and witnessed by constable Kelly.

 

House 10: Cheevers

The head of the household was Edward Cheevers, a 60-year-old married farmer living with his wife Sarah (55) and family – sons James (29) and Matthew (25), farmer’s sons as well as daughters Mary (31), Jennie (27) and Nellie (19), listed as farmer’s daughters. All the siblings were unmarried. All occupants were Roman Catholic, could read and write (except wife Sarah) and all came from County Galway. All are recorded as speaking English only. The house is described as 3rd class, with stone or brick walls, a thatched roof and had 2 rooms and 2 windows. There were 5 outbuildings consisting of a stable, cowhouse, piggery, barn and a shed.

 

House 11: Mannion

The head of the family was 53-year-old married farmer, Edward Mannion who lived with his wife Celia (50) and family sons – Thomas (18), John (16), Martin (14), William (12) and 5-year-old James who are all listed as scholars with the exception of the youngest. All the occupants were Roman Catholic, could read and write, (except head of family Edward and youngest child James) and all came from County Galway. The wife, Celia, is recorded as being able to speak both English and Irish while only English is listed for the others. The house was 2nd class with stone or brick walls, thatched roof and had 2 rooms and 3 windows. There were 6 outbuildings – a stable, cow-house, calf-house, piggery, barn and a shed. The census form was signed by Edward Mannion using his mark and was witnessed by constable Kelly.

 

 

[1] May possibly be Duane, as per later census.

[2] Surname given as Kerr in 1911 returns.

This page was added on 24/11/2019.

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