Hampstead

Doire Liath

Roger Harrison

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Hampstead / Doire Liath                             Irish Grid: M 66080 37876

 

Author: Roger Harrison

The townland of Hampstead is in the civil parish of Ballymacward, in the barony of Tiaquin and the County of Galway.

 

Situation:

(John O’Donovan 1806-1861)

 

Is situated mostly in the western side of this parish in the barony of Kilconnel bounded by Gorrymore in said barony by Mount Bernard, Killooaun Browne, Mount Hazel, Killamude East, Lissloughlin and Alloon Upper in the barony of Tiaquin. The townland shares boundaries with the following townlands:

 

Garrymore

Mountbernard

Killooaun Browne

Mounthazel

Killamude East

Lisloughlin

Alloon Upper

 

 

Description:

(John O’Donovan 1806-1861)

Is the property Francis Davis held by deed for ever. It contains 547a. 0r. 23p. about 16 acres of which is bog, the remainder arable of a good quality. Houses and roads are in good repair. Pays for County Cess £5. 4s. 3d.

 

Census of Ireland 1821 – 1911

The first full population census of Ireland was taken in 1821 and every ten years thereafter and the first four were arranged by county, barony, civil parish and townland.

 

1821: Only some fragments for small parts of county Galway survive. There are no   surviving records for Ballymacward.

1831: The only surviving records are from Counties Antrim and Derry.

1841: There are no surviving records for County Galway.

1851:   There are no surviving records for County Galway.

1861: Census records for 1861 and 1871 were deliberately destroyed by the government

1881: The records for 1881 and 1891 were pulped as waster paper during the shortages of World War I.

1901:   Full Census records are available. See below.

1911:   Full Census records are available See below.

 

 

1911 Census

Overview of Townland

The census of 1911 shows that there were 5 houses in the townland and that they were all occupied and listed as being private dwellings. They were all constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls with house 1 having slate, iron or tiled roofing and the others having just thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing. House 1 was a 1st class dwelling, house 2 and 5 were 3rd class and houses 3 and 4 were 2nd class dwellings. House 1 had 6 rooms and 14 windows in the front, House 2 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, houses 3 and 4 had 2 rooms and 3 windows and house 5 had 2 rooms and 1 window. There were a total of 19 out buildings in the townland and they consisted of 6 stables, 1 coach house, 1 harness room, 5 cow houses, 1 calf house, 3 piggeries, 1 fowl house and a barn. The enumerator’s abstract return (form N) shows that there were a total of 28 people in the townland, 11 males and 17 females. 8 males and 11 females were Roman Catholic and 3 males and 6 females were Church of Ireland. The enumerator for the area was Const. P. Kyne.

 

House 1: Johnston / Watson / Flemming / Lally / Hansberry / Conary

There were 12 members of the household in house 1 and the head of the family was listed as being Thomas Collis (sic) (52) and he had been married to Alice Constance (40) for 11 years and I that time they had had 4 children and all of those had survived. Those 4 children lived in the house and were Thos. James (9), Catherine Mary (8) Samuel (7) and Alice Grace (4). Also in the house at that time were Thomas Collis’ sister, Sarah Jane (45), his sister-in-law, Marion Watson (43), a governess, Sarah Elizabeth Flemming (26) and 3 servants, Margaret Lally (23), Denis Hansberry and Patrick Conary (sic) (19). Margaret Lally, Denis Hansberry and Patrick Conary (sic) were all Roman Catholic and the others were all Church of Ireland and all the household were born in Co. Galway. Alice Grace and Denis could not read but all the others could read and write. Thomas Collis was a farmer, Thos. James, Catherine Mary and Samuel were scholars, Sarah Elizabeth was a governess, Margaret was a general servant domestic, Denis was a coachman domestic servant and Patrick was a gardener domestic servant. The house was a 6 roomed, 1st class dwelling with 4 stables, a coach house, a harness room, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery and a fowl house. The landholder was Thomas C. Johnston Esq. J.P.

 

House 2: Dooley / Kenny

James (52) was the head of this family and he had been married to Bridget (42) for 20 years and in that time they had had 3 children and all of those children had survived. They lived with their step son, James Kenny (19) and 2 daughters, May (15) and Nora (13). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. There was nothing entered under the language heading but all, apart from May, could read and write. James was listed as being a farmer, James was a farmer’s son and Nora was a scholar. The house they all lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and they had a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn. James Dooley was listed as being the landholder.

 

House 3: Murphy

The head of the Murphy family in house 3 was Patrick (76) and he was married to Catherina (70) and had been for 32 years and in that time they had had 3 children but only 2 of those had survived. Those 2 daughters also lived in the house and they were Margaret (28) and Katie Agnes (25). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick and Catherina could both speak both Irish and English and Catherina, Margaret and Katie Agnes could read and write. Patrick was a farmer. The house they all lived in was a 2 roomed, 2nd class house with a cow house. Patk. Murphy was the landholder.

 

House 4: Hynes

The sole occupant of this house was Thomas (40), who was married but there was no entry for his wife. He was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway. He could not read and was listed as being a farmer. The house he lived in was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, cow house and piggery. Thomas Hynes was the landholder.

 

House 5: Carty

The las house in Hampstead was home to the Carty family and the head of this family was the widow Margaret (70), who had been married for 31 years and in that time she had had 7 children, of which 5 had survived. She shared the house with those 5 children and they were Nannie (30), Delia (28), Thomas (26), William (24) and Norah (20). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All the family could read and write but only Margaret could speak Irish and English. Thomas and William were listed as farmer’s sons. The house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house with a cow house. Margaret Carty was the landholder.

 

1901 Census

Overview of the townland

According to the 1901 census there were a total of 5 houses in the townland at that time. All were built of stone, brick or concrete and house 1 had slate, iron or tiles for roofing while the others all had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. House 1 was a 1st class dwelling, houses 2, 3 and 5 were 2nd class dwellings and house 4 was a 3rd class dwelling. House 1 had 6 rooms and 16 windows, house 2 had 2 rooms 4 windows in the front, houses 3 and 5 had 2 rooms and 2 rooms and 3 windows and house 4 had 2 rooms and 2 windows. The enumerator’s abstract return (form N) shows that there were a total of 25 people in the townland at that time and, 10 males and 15 females. 9 males and 13 females were Roman Catholic and 1 male and 2 females were Church of Ireland. The enumerator for the area was Sergeant George A. Wilson.

 

House 1: Johnston / Watson / Abberton/ Lyons

The first house in Hampstead was home to the Johnston family and the head of the family was Thos. Collis (41) and he was married to Alice Constance (30). They shared the house with a sister-in-law, Kathleen Watson (38), a general servant, Winifred Abberton (20) and a coachman, Mathew Lyons (25). Winifred and Mathew were Roman Catholic and the others were all Church of Ireland and all the household were born in Co. Galway. They could all read and write but there was nothing entered for any of them under the “language” heading. Thos. Collis was a Grocing (sic) farmer and collector of Statistics Board of Agriculture. Winifred was a general servant and Mathew was a coachman. The house was a 6 roomed, 1st class dwelling and the landholder was Thomas Johnston.

 

House 2: Dooley / Kenny

James (40) was listed as the head of this family and he lived with his wife, Bridget (30), a step son, James (9) and 2 daughters Mary (5) and Norah (3). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. James (40), Bridget and James (9) could read and write but there was nothing entered for languages. James (40) was a farmer, Bridget was a housekeeper and James (9) was a scholar. The house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and the landholder was James Dooley.

 

House 3: Murphy

The head of the Murphy family in house 3 was Patrick (60) and h was married to Catherine (48) and they shared the house with 3 of their children, Michael (26), Margaret (18) and Catherine (15). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick and Margaret spoke Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the children. Apart from Patrick, they could all read and write. Patrick was a farmer, Catherine was a housekeeper and the children were all in farming. The house was a 3 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Patrick Murphy was the landholder.

 

House 4: Hynes

The sole occupant of house 4 was Thomas Hynes (36), who was married but there is no record of his wife in this entry. He was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway. He s[poke both Irish and English but could not read or write. His occupation was listed as being a farmer. The house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Thomas Hynes was the landholder.

 

House 5: Carty / Kenny

The household of the last house in Hampstead consisted of 9 members with Thomas (60) and he shared the house with his wife Margret (45), 6 of their children, Annie (20), Thomas (18), William (16), Mary (12), Norah (10) and Margaret (8) and Thomas’ sister, Honor Kenny (66), who was a widow. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Thomas (60) and Margaret (45) spoke both Irish and English. Apart from Thomas (60), William and Honor could not read but all the others could read and write. Thomas (60) was a Herd, Margaret (45) was a housekeeper, Annie was an assistant housekeeper, Thomas (18) and William were listed as being in farming and Mary, Norah and Margaret (8) were scholars. The house they all lived in was a 2 roomed 3rd class dwelling and the landholder was James Raftery.

 

Griffith’s Valuation:

The Primary Valuation of Ireland in 1855 was a survey involving a detailed valuation of every taxable holding of agricultural or built property on the island of Ireland. It was completed between 1864 and 1865.

The Land around this area was owned by Ellen Morgan and Sisters and the leased a number of tenements to the following: Edward Browne leased a herd’s house on 161 acres, 1 rood and 36 perches of land for £99 for land and £1 for the house, Martin Blake leased a house and offices on 275 acres, 3 roods and 23 perches of land for £150 10s for the land and £30 for the buildings, Richard Sharpe leased 98 acres and 2 roods of land for £45 10s and Michael Murphy leased a house on 4 acres 3 roods and 9 perches of land for £2 10s for the land and 10s for the house. John Kilgennane (sic) leased a house on 2 acres, 1 rood and 9 perches of land for £1 for the land and 10s for then house, Winifred Mannion leased 2 tenements, both of 1 acres and 4 perches of land for which she paid 10s each for the land and 5s on one of the plots for a house and Patrick Hynes leased 2 tenements, one of a house on 1 acre and 14 perches of land for 10s for the land and 5s for the house and a second plot of land of 1 acre and 4 perches for which he paid 10s.

This page was added on 30/12/2019.

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