Glennamucka

Gleann na Muice

Roger Harrison

My location
Get Directions

Glennamucka (Glennamuck) / Gleann na Muice             Irish Grid M 62338 36493

 

Author: Roger Harrison

 

Glennamucka is a townland in the Civil Parish of Ballymacward in the barony of Tiaquin and the County of Galway.

 

Description:

(John O’Donovan 1806-1861)

This townland is the property Lord Clancarty who holds it under a deed for ever. It contains 446a. 2r. 7p. about 45 acres of which is bog, remainder arable and pasture of middling good quality. Houses and roads are in very good repair. Amount of County Cess £10. 6. 9.

 

Situation:

(John O’Donovan 1806-1861)

Lies in the West of this parish in the barony of Tiaquin is bounded by Creeraun and Gurteen townlands in this parish and by Cloonkeen and Killooaun in the parish of Clonkeen in same barony.

 

This is a list of townlands that share a border with Glennamucka.

 

 

Census of Ireland (1821- 1911)

The first full population census of Ireland was taken in 1821 and the first four Irish censuses were arranged by county, barony, civil parish and townland.

 

1821: Only some fragments for small parts of county Galway survive. There are no records     for Ballymacward.

1831: The only surviving records are from Counties Antrim and Derry.

1841: There are no surviving records for County Galway.

1851:   There are no surviving records for County Galway.

1861: Census records for 1861 and 1871 were deliberately destroyed by the government

1881: The records for 1881 and 1891 were pulped as waster paper during the shortages of World War I.

1901: Full Census records are available   See below.

1911:   Full Census records are available   See below.

 

1911 Census

Overview of the townland

The 1911 census shows that there were 6 houses in the townland and that 5 of those were occupied with house 6 unoccupied, bur Patrick Walsh was the landholder of house 6. All the houses were constructed of stone, brick or concrete and houses 2 and 4 had slate, iron or tiled roofs while houses 1, 3 and 5 had only thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. House 5 was a 3rd class dwelling and the others were all 2nd class. House 5 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, houses 1 and 4 had 2 rooms and 3 windows, houses, house 3 had 3 rooms and 4 windows and house 2 had 3 rooms and 6 windows in the front. The out-offices and farm-steadings return show that there were a total of 35 out buildings in the townland and they consisted of 5 stables, 2 coach houses, 5 cow houses, 5 calf houses, a dairy, 4 piggeries, 2 fowl houses, 5 barns, 5 sheds and a forge. The enumerator’s abstract return shows that there were a total of 34 people in the townland at that time consisting of 18 male and 16 female. The enumerator for the area was Const. Daniel Fitzpatrick.

 

House1: Daly

The head of the family in the first house in Glennamucka was Thomas (67) who had been married to Bridget (72) for 35 years and they had had 3 children and all of those had survived. They shared the house with son Michael (34) who had been married to Mary (31) for 4 years but there were no entries for children. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English except Bridget. All the family could read and write. Thomas was a farmer and Michael was a farmer’s son. The house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and they had a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a barn and a shed. The landholder was Thomas Daly.

 

House 2: Mac Giolla’núia[i] / Nic Thoirbhealaigh / Ó hÉidhn

The head of this family was Pádraic (74) and he shared the house with Brighid Mac Giolla-ánatha (nic Thoirdhealaigh) (57), Máire (32), Risteárd (25), Anna (23), Liam (20), Seosamh (19), Nóra (51) and Seosamh Ó hÉidhn (33).

 

House 3: Raftery / Fitzpatrick / Neary

Patrick (38) was listed as the head of this family and he shared the house with servants Mary Fitzpatrick (72) and Michael Neary (18). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mary could speak Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others so that could indicate that they only spoke English. Only Patrick and Michael could read and write. Patrick was a farmer, Mary was a domestic servant and Michael was a general servant. The house was a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and they had a stable, a coach house, a cow house, 2 calf houses, a dairy, a fowl house, a barn and a shed. The landholder was Patrick Raftery.

 

House 4: Scarry

There were 10 members of the Scarry family in house 4 and the head of the family was Thomas (47) and he had been married to Margaret (46) for 20 years and in that time they had had 8 children and all of those had survived. Those 8 children lived with them and they were John (19), Delia (17), Mary (15), Timothy (13), Ellie (11), James (8), Sarah (5) and Patrick (3). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Margaret, Timothy, Ellie and James could speak Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others under that heading so that probably means they only spoke English. Apart from young Patrick, they could all read and write. Thomas was a herd, John was listed as a herd’s son and Timothy, Ellie, James and Sarah were scholars. The house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class house and they had a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a barn and a shed. The landholder was Patrick Raftery.

 

House 5: Walsh

There were 8 members of the Walsh family in house 5 and the head of the family was Patrick (67) and he had been married to Bridget (54) for 35 years and in that time they had had 12 children and 11 of those had survived. They shared the house with 6 of those children, Tommie (25), Michael (21), Lawrence (10), Sarah (17), Delia (15) and Katie (13). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick and Bridget spoke Irish an English and the rest of the family spoke only English. They could all read and write. Patrick and Michael were blacksmiths and farmers, Tommie was listed as being a farmer’s son and farmer and Lawrence and Katie were scholars. The house they all shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house and they had a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a barn, a shed and a forge. Patrick Walsh was the landholder.

 

1901 Census

Overview of the townland

The 1901 census shows that there were a total of 6 houses in the townland and that they were all occupied and house 2 was a shop and the others were all private dwellings. The houses were all built of stone, brick or concrete and houses 2 and 5 had slate, iron or tiled roofs while the others only had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. Houses 3 and 6 were 3rd class dwellings and the others were all 2nd class. House 3 had 2 rooms and 1 window, houses 5 and 6 had 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front, house 1 had 2 rooms and 3 windows, house 2 had 3 rooms and 6 windows and house 4 had 4 rooms and 4 windows. The out-offices and farm-steadings return (form B.2) shows that there were a total of 32 out buildings in the townland and they consisted of 3 stables, a coach house, 5 cow houses, 4 calf houses, a dairy, 6 piggeries, 3 fowl houses, 5 barns, a shed, 2 stores and a forge. The enumerator’s abstract return (form N) shows that there were a total of 42 people in the townland, 21 each of male and female. The enumerator for the area was Const. Patrick Duffy.

 

House 1: Daly

Thomas (51) was listed as being the head of this family and he was married to Bridget (46) and they shared the house with 3 of their children, Michael (23), Mary (21) and Patrick (21). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Thomas spoke Irish and English and the others all spoke only English. They could all rea and write. Thomas was a farmer, Bridget was a housekeeper, Michael was a mason, Mary was a dressmaker and Patrick was a farmer’s son. The house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and they had a cow house, a calf house, 2 piggeries, a fowl house and a barn. Thomas Daly was the landholder.

 

House 2: Forde / Curley / Hynes

Patrick (64) was listed as the head of this family and he was married to Bridget (46) and they shared the house with 7 of their children, Mary (21), Richard (15), Anne (13), Margaret (11), William (10), Joseph (9) and Teresa (7). Also in the house were Bridget’s sister, Hanoria (sic) Curley (30) and a servant, Joseph Hynes (22). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and all could read and write. Patrick was a shopkeeper, Mary and Hanoria (sic) were shop assistants, Joseph was a general servant domestic and Richard, Anne, Margaret, William, Joseph and Teresa were scholars. The house was a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and they had a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a fowl house, a barn and 2 stores. The landholder was Patrick Forde.

 

House 3: Hynes

The sole occupant of house 3 was Kate (19). She was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway. She spoke Irish and English and could read and write. She was a general servant domestic. The house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and the landholder was Patrick Forde.

 

House 4: Raftery / Hannon/ Burke

The widow Bedelia (sic) (59) was the head of this family and she shared the house with 2 of her sons, Patrick (35) and Thomas (29) and 2 servants, Phillip Hannon (75), who was a widower, and Hyacinth Burke (45). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. There were no entries for any of them under the Irish Language heading which probably meant that they only spoke English. Phillip could not read but the others could all read and write. Bedelia was a farmer, Patrick and Thomas were farmer’s sons and Hyacinth and Phillip were farm servants. The house they all lived in was a 4 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and they had a stable, a coach house, a cow house, a calf house, a dairy, a piggery, a fowl house, a barn and a shed. The landholder was Bedelia Raftery.

 

House 5: Scarry

The head of this family was Thomas (36) and he was married to Margaret (36) and they lived with 5 of their children, John (9), Delia (7), Mary (5), Timothy (3) and Ellie (2mths). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Margaret spoke Irish and English and there was nothing entered for the others so they may have spoken only English. Thomas, Margaret, John and Delia all could read and write. Thomas was a shepherd and John and Delia were scholars. The house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and they had a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a barn and a shed. The landholder was Bedelia Raftery.

 

House 6: Walsh

There were 13 members of this Walsh family and the head of the family was Patrick (56) and he was married to Bridget (42) and they shared the house with 11 of their children, James (24), Patrick (22), Margaret (20), Anne (18), Thomas (15), Maria (13), Michael (11), Sarah (8), Bidilia (sic) (6), Kate (3) and Lawrence (6mths). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick (56) and Bridget spoke Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others, which could indicate that they only spoke English. Apart from Bidilia (sic), Kate and Lawrence, they could all read and write. Patrick (56) was a farmer and blacksmith, James was a farmer’s son, Patrick (22) was a blacksmith, Margaret and Anne were farmer’s daughters and Thomas, Maria, Michael and Sarah were scholars. The house they all lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and they had a cow house, a piggery, a barn and a forge. Patrick Walsh was the landholder.

 

Griffith’s Valuation

The Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) shows that Patrick Raftery leased 33 acres, 1 rood and 5 perches of bog for 5s, a house and offices on 274 acres, 3 roods and 8 perches of land for £130 for the land and £5 for the buildings and a cottiers cottage for 5s, all from Lord Dunsandle. In turn, Patrick Raftery leased a house and office on 15 acres, 1 rood and 13 perches of land to Michael Daly for £2 5s for the land and 10s for the buildings, a house and 1 acre, 3 roods and 33 perches of bog to Patrick Nevin for 5s for the bog and 5s for the house. John Power leased a house and office on 9 acres, 3 roods and 23 perches of land from Patrick Raftery for £4 5s for the land and 15s for the buildings, Patrick Hynes leased a house and office on 7 acres, 3 roods and 27 perches of land for £4 5s for the land and 15s for the buildings. James Naughton leased 2 tenements from Patrick Raftery, the first being 3 roods and 20 perches of land for 10s and a second of a house with 10 perches of a garden for 1s for the garden and 9s for the house and James Walsh leased a house and office on 3 acres of land from Patrick Raftery for £ 15s for the land and 10s for the buildings.

 

 

 

 

 

[i] Difficult to read

This page was added on 20/01/2020.

No Comments

Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this page!

Add a comment about this page

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *