Alloonbaun

Alúin Bhán

Mike Kelly/Galway Rural Development

Alloonbaun / Alúin Bhán                                     Irish Grid M 68313 37145

  

Author: Mike Kelly/Galway Rural Development

 

The townland of Alloonbaun is in the civil parish of Ballymacward, in the barony of Tiaquin and the County of Galway.

 

O’ Donovan’s Ordnance Survey Field Books,1838 states that the meaning of the townland name is “white Alloon”. He gives the following as the source of the name: Andrew Browne, Esq., By. Sketch Map, Francis Davies, Esq.,Hon. William. Le Poer Trench and William Woods.

 

 

Situation:

O’ Donovan states that the townland is situated about 4 miles north of Kilconnell. The townland shares boundaries with the following townlands:

Description:

O’Donovan states that it was the property of Lord Clancarty by deed for ever. It is all under a good state of cultivation although of a bad quality. The road bounding its western side is in good repair. The houses also are in good repair. The inhabitants live comfortably. The County Cess is £12. 9. 8. ½. According to Griffith’s Valuation the total acreage of the townland is 396 acres 3 roods and 25 perches.

 

 

Census of Ireland (1821- 1911)

The first full population census of Ireland was taken in 1821 and the first four Irish censuses were arranged by county, barony, civil parish and townland.

 

1821: Only some fragments for small parts of county Galway survive. There are no records     for Ballymacward.

1831: The only surviving records are from Counties Antrim and Derry.

1841: There are no surviving records for County Galway.

1851:   There are no surviving records for County Galway.

1861: Census records for 1861 and 1871 were deliberately destroyed by the government

1881: The records for 1881 and 1891 were pulped as waster paper during the shortages of World War I.

1901:   Full Census records are available   See below.

1911:   Full Census records are available   See below.

 

1911 Census

Overview of townland

There were 10 houses in total in this townland, all of which were built and are recorded as private dwellings with the exception of house number 6 which was a public house. All houses had stone or brick walls, 6 had slate roofs while four had roofs of thatch, wood or other perishable material. All dwellings were recorded as 2nd class with the exception of number 6 which is recorded as 1st class. There was a total of 45 people living in the townland of which 28 were male and 17 were female. There were 27 males and 16 female Roman Catholics. The others were a female Methodist and a male member of the Church of Ireland. All were born in County Galway with the exception of one male born in England. The heads of the households were also the landholders with the exception of house number 6, the public house occupied by Patrick Kyne but owned by Rev. Joyce. There was a total of 60 out buildings listed for the townland which comprised of 8 stables, 2 coach houses, 3 harness rooms, 10 cow houses, 4 calf houses, 9 piggeries, 3 fowl houses, 7 barns, 4 turf houses, 3 potato houses and 6 sheds and one store.

 

House 1: Mitchell

Thomas Mitchell was the head of this household and his age was given as 68 years old, he was married, could read and write and was a Roman Catholic. He spoke English and Irish came from County Galway. His occupation was given as farmer. He lived with his wife Anne, who was 65 years old, a Roman Catholic, she could read and write and spoke English and Irish. No occupation was given for Anne and she came also from County Galway. They were married for 28 years and had no children. The couple lived in a 2nd class house that had four rooms with five windows. The roof of the house was on either slate or iron and the walls stone or brick. The out buildings consisted of a stable, a cow-house, a piggery and a barn. The head of household was also the landholder.

 

House 2: Forde/Manning

The head of the household was Bridget Forde, a widow aged 51. She could read and write, spoke English and came from County Galway. The column for Irish language has been left blank for all occupants. Bridget had been married for 19 years and had had 8 children, all of whom were living. She shared the house with her four sons, Michael (22), Patrick (16), Thomas (13) and Martin (10). The two eldest sons’ occupations are given as farmer’s sons and the two younger as scholars. All four sons could read and write, were Roman Catholic and had been born in County Galway. The house was also shared by Bridget’s two brothers, Thomas and Patrick Manning. Thomas was aged 49 and Patrick’s age was given as 36. Both of the Manning brothers are described as agricultural labourers, could read and write, were Roman Catholic and came from County Galway. All the men in the household were single. The household was completed by Margaret Forde, a three months old grand-daughter of Bridget Forde. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms and 3 windows. The roof of the house was either thatch or wood. The out buildings consisted of a cow-house and a piggery.

 

House 3: Costelloe/Cunningham

The head of the household is listed as Anne Costello, an 87-year-old widow. She was Roman Catholic, could read and write and came from County Galway. She had been married for 60 years and had given birth to ten children, eight of whom were still living. She shared the house with her son Pat Costelloe, a 58-year-old single farmer, her daughter Bridget Costelloe who was 52 and also single and her 42-year-old son Michael Costelloe also single whose occupation is given as farmer’s son. No occupations were given for Anne or Bridget. Also present in the house was John Cunningham who was Anne Costelloe’s 22-year-old grandson whose occupation was given as a farmer’s son. All occupants are Roman Catholic and all could read and write, however, the language column on the census form was left blank so it is assumed the family spoke only English. All occupants came from County Galway.

The family lived in a 2nd class house which had 5 rooms and 5 windows. The walls were of stone or brick and the roof of slate. The family had out buildings as follows: – a stable, a cow-house, a calf-house, a piggery and a barn. The census form was signed by Anne Costelloe using her mark which was witnessed by Constable Kyne.

 

House 4: Barrett

The head of the household was Michael Barrett, a 59-year-old married farmer. He could read and write, spoke English and Irish and was born in County Galway. He lived with his wife Kate, aged 50. She could also read and write, spoke only English and came from County Galway. They had been married for sixteen years and had two children who were both still living. Their sons were Patrick aged 14 and Laurence aged 8 who are both described as scholars who could read and write. No information is given as to whether the sons spoke Irish. All family members were Roman Catholic and the census form was signed by Michael Barrett. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 4 rooms and 3 windows. The roof of the house was either wood or thatch, the walls were stone or brick and the house had 6 outbuildings comprising of a cow house, piggery, barn and a shed.

 

House 5: Joyce/Connolly/Gavin

The head of the household was Timothy Joseph Joyce, a Parish Priest aged 41. He could read and write, spoke English and Irish and came from County Galway. Also in the house were 60-year-old Catherine Gavin, a single woman described as a housekeeper and Michael Connolly aged 20 whose occupation is given as servant. All occupants were Roman Catholic, could read and write, spoke English and Irish, were all single and were all born in County Galway. The form was signed by Timothy Joyce. The family lived in a 2nd class house which had 9 rooms and 5 windows. The roof of the house was slate and the walls were stone or brick. There were 8 outbuildings comprising of a stable, coach house, harness room, cow house, a fowl house, turf house, potato house and a shed. The head of the household is also the landholder.

 

House 6: Kyne/Lally/Flanagan/Forde/Brien

The household is headed by single shop-keeper, Patrick Kyne. He was Roman Catholic, could read and write and came from County Galway. Also in the house was his aunt, Bridget Forde, a 37-year-old widow. She had been married for 14 years and had no children. She is described as Roman Catholic, could read and write and came from County Galway. Bernard Flanagan, aged 24, is listed as a boarder whose occupation is shop assistant. He was single, Roman Catholic, came from County Galway and could read and write. There are also two servants listed in the house, 23-year-old Mary Brien, a domestic servant and 36-year-old John Lally, described as a farmer’s servant. Both servants were single, Roman Catholic, could read and write, and were born in County Galway. No information is given regarding languages spoken by any of the occupants. The family lived in a 1st class house which had 7 rooms and 7 windows. The roof of the house was slate and there were 8 outbuildings comprising of a stable, harness room, cow house, piggery, turf house, 2 potato houses and a store. The head of the household, Patrick Kyne was not the landholder whose name is recorded as Rev. J. Joyce.

 

House 7: Raftery

The head of the household is Michael Raftery, a 35-year-old single farmer. His brother, William aged 30 also lived in the house and his occupation is given as agricultural labourer. Both brothers were single, could read and write and came from County Galway. No information is given regarding languages spoken by either brother. The occupants lived in a 2nd class house which had 3 rooms and 3 windows. The roof of the house was either thatch or wood. There were four outbuildings which included a cow-house, piggery, barn and shed. The head of the household is also the landowner.

 

House 8: Parker/Higgins/Casheen[1]/Carney

The head of the household was a 76-year-old widow, Susan Parker. She was a Methodist, could read and write and originated in County Galway. She had been married for 50 years and had three children, all still living. Also in the house was her son William, single and aged 42. His occupation is recorded as Petty Sessions Clerk and his religion as Church of Ireland. He could also read and write and was born in County Galway. household also had 3 single, Roman Catholic servants. Mary Higgins (71) is recorded as a domestic servant Cook who could not read and came from County Galway. Housemaid Lizzie Casheen (sic) aged 25 could read and write and came from County Galway and farm servant Thomas Carney (24) could also read and write and was born in England. The house was a 2nd class houses with 6 rooms and 5 windows. The roof was made of slate and the walls were stone or brick. The ten out buildings consisted of 2 stables, coach house, harness room, cow house, calf house, piggery, fowl house, bard and turf house. The head of the household was also the landholder.

 

House 9: Kelly/Brown

The house is occupied by head of household, widow Mary Kelly (67), and her sons – John (45), and Joseph (35). John’s occupation is given as farmer while Joseph is described as single and a farmer’s son. Mary had been married for 47 years and had six children, all still living. Also in the house was her daughter-in-law, Mary Kelly aged 35. This Mary had been married to John for 3 years and had two children, both still living. The grandsons are also named John and Joseph as 1 and 2 years old respectively.   The household is completed by 16-year-old domestic servant, Mary Brown. All the occupants were Roman Catholic, could read and write and came from County Galway. The census form was signed by Mary Kelly using her mark which was witnessed by Constable P. Kyne. The occupants lived in a 2nd class house which had 8 rooms and 5 windows. The roof of the house was slate and the walls were of stone or brick. There were eight outbuildings which included a stable, cow house, calf house, piggery, fowl house, barn, turf house and a shed. The head of the household is also the landowner.

 

House 10: Morgan

The head of the house is John Morgan, a single farmer aged 75. Also in the house were his brother Richard also single and aged 70 and unmarried sisters Grace-Anne (60) and Letitia (73). No occupations are given for the sisters while Richard is also described as a farmer. All occupants were Roman Catholic, could read and write and came from County Galway. The occupants lived in a 2nd class house which had 5 rooms and 3 windows. The roof of the house was either thatch or wood and the walls were of stone or brick. There were six outbuildings which consisted of a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a barn and a shed. The head of the household was also the landholder.

 

 

1901 Census

Overview of townland

There were 10 houses in total in this townland, all of which were built and are recorded as private dwellings with the exceptions of house number 3 and 6 which were recorded as public houses and house number 5 is described as a Parochial house. All houses had stone or brick walls, 5 had slate roofs while the other five had roofs of thatch, wood or other perishable material. All dwellings were recorded as 2nd class with the exception of house number 6 and house number 9 which are recorded as 1st class. There was a total of 59 people living in the townland of which 36 were male and 23 were female. There were 34 males and 22 female Roman Catholics. The others were a female Methodist and two male members of the Church of Ireland. All were born in County Galway. In all cases, the heads of the households were also the landholders.

 

 

House 1: Mitchell/Farrell/Egan

Thomas Mitchell was the head of this household and his age was given as 48 years old, he was married, could read and write, was a Roman Catholic and he came from County Galway. His occupation was given as farmer. He lived with his wife Anne, who was 46 years old, a Roman Catholic, she could read and write and spoke English and Irish. No occupation was given for Anne and she came also from County Galway. Also in the house was his mother-in-law, 65-year-old widow Margaret Farrell who was Roman Catholic, spoke Irish and English and could not read or write. The final occupant of the house was lodger Michael Egan aged 48, a single man described as a farm labourer and servant. He too was Roman Catholic. Thomas Mitchell signed the census form. The family lived in a 2nd class house that was two roomed with three windows. The walls were of stone or brick and the roof of the house was either wood or thatch. The census from was signed by Thomas Mitchell.

 

House 2: Forde/Mannion

The head of the household was Patrick Forde, a married farmer aged 50. He could not read or write, spoke English and Irish and came from County Galway. His wife, Bridget (42) also lived in the house as well as their children – Michael (12), Anne (9), Patrick (5) and Thomas aged 2. The three eldest children’s occupations are given as scholars while wife Bridget is described as a housekeeper. All the children were Roman Catholic and born in County Galway and with the exception of the youngest, could all read and write. Also in the house was Thomas’ brother-in-law Patrick Mannion, a single man aged 35 whose occupation is given as general farm labourer. He was also Roman Catholic, born in County Galway and could read and write. Thomas and Bridget could speak English and Irish but no details of the proficiency of the others is listed. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms and 3 windows. The walls were of stone or brick and the roof of the house was either wood or thatch. The census form was signed by Patrick Forde using his mark which was witnessed by Constable Byrne.

 

House 3: Costelloe/Cunningham/Stankard

The head of the household is listed as James Costello, an 80-year-old married man whose occupation is listed as farmer and publican and was Roman Catholic, born in County Galway. He was married to Anne (78) whose occupation is given as housekeeper. She was also Roman Catholic, could read and write and came from County Galway. Both husband and wife spoke English and Irish. The shared the house with their son Patrick (40), Hugh (34) and Michael (30) whose occupations are given as farmers as well as their 28-year old unmarried daughter Bridget Costelloe whose occupation was listed as housekeeper. Also in the house were the couple’s grand-daughter Mary Ann Cunningham, a 20-year-old housekeeper together with their grandsons Patrick (16) and John (8) Cunningham and 17-year-old Edward Stankard (sic). Edward’s occupation was a shop assistant while Patrick and John were scholars. All occupants are Roman Catholic and all could read and write, however, the language proficiency is only given for the head of the family and his wife. All occupants came from County Galway. The family lived in a 2nd class dwelling described as public house which had 3 rooms and 5 windows. There were also 8 outbuildings, the walls were of brick or stone and the roof was slated. The form was signed by James Costelloe.

 

House 4: Barrett/Kelly

The head of the household was Michael Barrett, a 49-year-old married farmer. He could read and write, and was born in County Galway. He lived with his housekeeper wife, Kate, aged 40. She could also read and write, and came from County Galway. Their sons were Patrick aged 4 and Laurence aged 4 months. No information is given as to the language proficiency of the household. Also in the house was 20-year-old unmarried servant Patrick Kelly whose occupation is given as general farm labourer. All occupants were Roman Catholic and the census form was signed by Michael Barrett. The family lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms and 3 windows. The roof of the house was either wood or thatch and the walls were of stone or brick. The house also had four outbuildings. The census form was signed by Michael Barrett.

 

House 5: Fallon/Pelly/Daly/Dempsey

The head of the household was John Fallon, a 31-year-old Roman Catholic clergyman administrator and a boarder, 43-year-old curate named Joseph Pelly (sic). John was joined by his sister Mary Fallon (29) whose occupation is given as manageress as well as domestic servant, Andrew Dempsey (19) and 19-year-old cook/servant Ellen Daly. All occupants were single, Roman Catholic, could read and write and came from County Galway. All occupants spoke English only. The occupants lived in a 2nd class house, described as a Parochial House and which had 3 rooms and 5 windows. The roof of the house was slated and the walls were of brick or stone. There were also five outbuildings and the census form was signed by Rev. John Fallon.

 

House 6: Forde/Lynch/Lally/Bryan[2]

The house is headed by married shop-keeper, William Forde (41). He was Roman Catholic, could read and write and came from County Galway. His wife Bridget (30) is described as a housekeeper and was also Roman Catholic, could read and write and came from County Galway. Both husband and wife spoke English and Irish. Also in the house were two single male shop assistants – Martin Lynch (21) and John Lynch (17) who were also both Roman Catholic, could read and write and came from County Galway. There were two servants listed also, Thomas Lally (19), a general servant and 16-year-old Mary Bryan, a domestic servant. Both were single, Roman Catholic, could read and write and came from County Galway. With the exception of the husband and wife, William and Bridget, all other occupants spoke only English. The family lived in a 1st class house, described as a public house, which had 4 rooms and 7 windows. The roof of the house was slated and the wall were of brick or stone. or wood. The property also had 6 outbuildings.

 

House 7: Raftery

The head of the household is Michael Raftery, a 70-year-old married farmer. His wife Kate was aged 65 and her occupation given as house-keeper. Both could read and write, were Roman Catholic and came from County Galway. Both Michael and Kate are shown as being able to speak English and Irish. They are joined in the house by their three single, grown up children, Michael (28), William (24) and 22-year-old Kate. The sons’ occupations are given as farm labourers while Kate is described as a house-keeper. All three siblings were Roman Catholic, could read and write and came from County Galway. No information is given on the languages spoken by the three siblings The occupants lived in a 2nd class house which had 2 rooms and 3 windows. The roof of the house was either thatch or wood and the walls were of stone or brick. There were also three outbuildings.

 

House 8: Kelly/Dowling

The head of the household was Joseph Kelly, a 68-year-old married farmer. His wife Mary was 54 and described as a housekeeper. Both could read and write, were Roman Catholic and originated in County Galway. Also in the house were their single grown up children, John (33) and Joseph (26) whose occupations are given as farmer’s sons and 21-year-old Maudie, a housekeeper. They are joined in the house by married daughter, May L. Dowling (28). All siblings were Roman Catholic, could read and write and were from County Galway. No details given on the language spoken by the siblings. The house is described as 2nd class with 4 rooms and 5 windows. The walls were of stone or brick and the roof was slated. There were also seven outbuildings and the census form was signed by Joseph Kelly.

 

House 9: Parker/ Higgins/ Culkin

The house is occupied by head of household, John R. Parker, a 67-year-old married farmer, his wife Susanna (60), a housekeeper and their son 30-year-old William E. Parker. Both John and William were Church of Ireland while Susanna was Wesleyan Methodist. All three could read and write and originated in County Galway. William E. was single and his occupation is given as Petty Sessions Clerk. The household also had three Roman Catholic servants, 30-year-old Mary Higgins, a single general domestic servant; Nannie Culkin (11), also a general domestic servant and 12-year-old Mike Culkin, a general farm servant. With the exception of Nannie Culkin who could read, the other servants could not read or write. All occupants spoke only English and servant Mary Higgins spoke both Irish and English. The occupants lived in a 1st class house which had 5 rooms and 6 windows. The roof of the house was slated and the walls were stone or brick. There were eight outbuildings

 

House 10: Morgan

The head of the house is John Morgan, a single farmer aged 65. Also in the house were his single brother Richard (63), a farmer and his unmarried sisters Grace (39) and Kate (50). The sisters’ occupations are described as house-keepers. All occupants were Roman Catholic, could read and write and came from County Galway. Both John and Richard are recorded as speaking English and Irish but no language details are given for the sisters. The occupants lived in a 2nd class house which had 3 rooms and 4 windows. The roof of the house was either thatch or wood and the walls were of stone or brick. There were also six outbuildings.

 

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation

Griffith’s Valuation of 1851 records the total acreage as 396 acres, 3 roods and 25 perches owned by Lord Clancarty and held by 13 tenants. The total valuation was recorded as £228, 5s. and 0d. which comprised land value of £192 10s. and buildings of £28 0s 0d.

 

 

 

 

[1] Could also be Culkeen or Culkin.

[2] Surname is transcribed as Bryde but is clearly Bryan. The 1911 census records it as Brien.

This page was added on 20/11/2019.

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