Ballymaconry

Baile Conraoi

Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

Townland:                                 Ballymaconry

Civil Parish:                              Omey

Barony:                                     Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                         Clifden

District Electoral Division:    Clifden

Area:                                          81.74 acres / 81 acres, 2 roods, 38 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Clifden R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Map

Galway Library for Ballymaconry

1670 Down Survey for Ballymaconry

Logainm for Ballymaconry

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Ballymaconry

 

1911 Census for Ballymaconry

Overview of Ballymaconry in 1911

The 1911 census shows that there were a total of 5 houses in the townland and that they were all occupied. House 2 was a private dwelling and the Ballyconell [sic] Orphanage and the other 4 houses were private dwellings. They were all constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and houses 1 and 2 had slate, iron or tiled roofs and the other 3 houses had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. House 2 was a 1st class dwelling, house 1 was a 2nd class dwelling and houses 3, 4 and 5 were 3rd class. Houses 3 and 4 had 1 room and 1 window in the front, house 4 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, house 1 had 6 rooms and 3 windows in the front and house 2 had 17 rooms and 8 windows in the front. There were a total of 20 out buildings, including a stable, a coach house, a harness room, 4 cow houses, a calf house, a dairy, 3 piggeries, a fowl house, a boiling house, a barn, a turf house, a potato house, a workshop, a store and a laundry. There were a total of 44 people, 34 males and 10 females. The enumerator for the area was Const. Patrick Dunning.

 

Conroy

The head of the first family in Ballymaconry was John (84) and he was married to Margaret (74) and Had been for 49 years and they had had 7 children, all of whom had survived. They shared their house with their daughter, Lizzie (29). They were all Church of Ireland and were born in Co. Galway. John could speak both Irish and English and all the household could read and write. John was listed as being a scripture reader. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 6 rooms and they had a cow house and a piggery. The landholder was the Irish Church Mission Society.

 

House 2 was the orphanage and was divided into 2 parts.

House 2.1

Surnames of the boys in the orphanage were as follows:

Borland, Sloan, Bennett, Thompson, Usher, Dunn, McIver, Russell, Williamson, Hemphill, Hynes, Woolsey, Allam [sic], Kelly, Livingstone, O’Neill, Burke, Watson, Downie [sic], Neil and Welsh.

 

All the boys in the orphanage could read and write and were Church of Ireland. David Sloan was a monitor and all the other boys were listed as being pupils. The boys were:

 

Robert Borland (19) was born in Belfast

David Sloan (17) was born in Belfast

Henry Bennett (17) was born in Co. Donegal

Richard Thompson (18) was born in Longford

Earnest Usher (17) (no place of birth)

William Dunn (13) (no place of birth)

Robert McIver (15) was born in Belfast

Joseph Russell (13) was born in Co. Wicklow

Robert Thompson (14) was born in Longford

David Williamson (16) was born in Belfast

Edward Hemphill (16) was born in Belfast

Henry Hynes (14) was born in Limerick

Henry Thompson (12) was born in Longford

John Woolsey (14) was born in Belfast

Ivan Allam [sic] (11) was born in Belfast

Herbert Kelly (14) was born in Co. Wicklow

William Livingstone (17) (no place of birth)

Henry O’Neill (14) was born in Co. Wicklow

Samuel Sloan (11) was born in Belfast

Bartley Burke (9) was born in Co. Galway

Joseph Watson (13) was born in Co. Dublin

David Downie [sic] (8) was born in Belfast

Michael Burke (6) was born in Co. Galway

William Neil (8) (no place of birth)

Michael Watson (11) was born in Co. Dublin

David Welsh (8) was born in Belfast

 

The house was a 1st class dwelling with 17 rooms and they had a stable, a coach house, a harness room, 2 cow houses, a calf house, a dairy, a piggery, a fowl house, a boiling house, a barn, a turf house, a potato house, a workshop, a store and a laundry. The landholder was the Irish Church Mission Society.

 

House 2.1

Purkis [sic]                              (additional surname: Martin)

Charles G. (60) was the head of this household and he had been married to Bessie (40) 17 years and they had had 1 child and they had survived. There were 2 children, Queenie (26)[i] and Kathleen (16). Also in the house at that time was a boarder, William Martin (16). William was a member of the Irish Church and the others were all members of the English Church. William was born in Co. Cork and the others were all born in England. They could all read and write. Charles G. was a master of orphanage, Bessie was a matron of orphanage, Queenie was an assistant matron of orphanage and Kathleen and William were scholars. The house was a 1st class dwelling with 17 rooms and they had a stable, a coach house, a harness room, 2 cow houses, a calf house, a dairy, a piggery, a fowl house, a boiling house, a barn, a turf house, a potato house, a workshop, a store and a laundry. The landholder was the Irish Church Mission Society.

 

Burke

The sole occupant of this house was the widower, Patrick (72) and he was Church of Ireland and born in Co. Galway. He spoke both Irish and English and could read only. He was listed as being a sexton[ii]. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with 1 room. The landholder was the Irish Church Mission Society.

 

Keely

The widow Mary (69) was the head of this household and she lived with her daughter Annie (21). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They could speak both Irish and English but only Annie could read and write. Annie was a domestic servant. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with 1 room. The landholder was the Irish Church Mission Society.

 

Ward

William (65) was the head of the last family in Ballymaconry and he had been married to Bridget (55) for 23 years and they had had 6 children and all had survived. They shared the house with 5 of those children and they were, Michael (20), Patrick (19), Thomas (14), Lizzie (13) and Delia (9). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. William and Bridget could speak both Irish and English and all the children could read and write. William was a farmer, Michael was a general labourer, Patrick was a farmer’s son and Thomas, Lizzie and Delia were scholars. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms and they had a cow house and a piggery. The landholder was William Ward.

 

 

1901 Census for Ballymaconry

Overview of Ballymaconry in 1901

The 1901 census shows that there were 7 houses in the townland and that house 3 was unoccupied but the landholder was Matthew Murry. House 1 was the Kingstown Orphanage and the others were all listed as being private dwellings. They were all constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and houses 1 and 2 had slate, iron or tiled roofs and the others all had only thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. House 1 was a 1st class dwelling, house 2 was a 2nd class dwelling, houses 4 and 7 were 3rd class dwellings and house 5 and 6 were 4th class. Houses 5 and 6 had 1 room and no windows, house4 had 1 room and 1 window, house 7 had 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front, house 2 had 7 rooms and 4 windows in the front and house 1 had 10 rooms and 8 windows in the front. There were a total 18 outbuildings consisting of a stable, a coach house, 3 cow houses, a calf house, a dairy, a piggery, 2 fowl houses, a boiling house, 2 barns, a potato house, a workshop, 2 sheds and a store. There were a total of 48 people in the townland, 36 males and 12 females. The enumerator for the area was Const. Martin Sweeney.

 

House 1 was the Kingstown Orphanage and was split into 2 parts, House 1.1 and the main body of the orphanage, house 1.2.

 

House 1.1

Purkis [sic]                             (Additional surname: McElligott)

Charles G. was listed as the head of the first household in Ballymacaory and he was married to Bessie (32). They shared the house with 3 of their daughters, Madge (19), Queenie (16) and Kathleen (6) and also a farm servant, Thomas McElligott (23). They were all members of the Irish Church with Thomas being born in Co. Cork and all the Purkis’ being born in England. They were all listed as being able to read and write. Charles G. was the master of orphanage, Bessie was a matron, Madge was an assistant matron, Queenie had no occupation, Kathleen was a scholar and Thomas was an agriculturist. The house was a 1st class dwelling with 10 rooms and they had a stable, a coach house, 2 cow houses, a calf house, a dairy, a piggery, 2 fowl houses, a boiling house, a barn, a potato house, a workshop, 2 sheds and a store. The landholder was the Irish Church Mission Society.

 

House 1.2

This part of house 1 was the main body of the orphanage and there were 25 boys living there and all were listed as members of the Irish Church and were scholars. They could all read except for Edward Hemphill and Henry Bennett, who could read only. The boys living there were:

 

Herbert Hamilton (15)           Born in Co. Antrim

Thomas Sands (15)                 Born in Co. Sligo

Henry Taylor (15)                    Born in Co. Antrim

Edward Ashdown (14)            Born in Isle of Wight, England

James Ennis (14)                      Born in Co. Dublin

John Linton (14)                       Born in Co. Dublin

William Fair (13)                      Born in Co. Dublin

Philip Fannin [sic] (13)            Born in Co. Dublin

Michael Nicholl (13)               Born in Co. Dublin

Charles Harbron [sic] (11)     Born in Co. Louth

Samuel Harbron [sic] (10)     Born in Co. Louth

Thomas Smith (10)                 Born in Co. Antrim

James Bavid [sic] (9)              Born in Co. Sligo

Frank Harbron [sic] (9)          Born in Co. Louth

Robert Fair (9)                        Born in Co. Dublin

Thomas Wilkinson (9)           Born in Co. Wicklow

Michael Fitzpatrick (9)         Born in Co. Wicklow

Peter Johnston (8)                 Born in Co. Dublin

Harold Bingham (8)               Born in England

Paul Murray (8)                       Born in Co. Dublin

Richard Thomas (8)                Born in Co, Longford

John Hemphill (8)                   Born in Co, Antrim

Henry Millar (8)                      Born in Co. Dublin

Edward Hemphill (6)             Born in Co. Antrim

Henry Bennett (7)                  Born in Co. Donegal

 

The house was a 1st class dwelling with 10 rooms and they had a stable, a coach house, 2 cow houses, a calf house, a dairy, a piggery, 2 fowl houses, a boiling house, a barn, a potato house, a workshop, 2 sheds and a store. The landholder was the Irish Church Mission Society.

 

Clesham [sic]

The widower, Martin (67) was the head of this household and he lived with his daughter, Elizabeth C. (32). They were all Church of Ireland and were born in Co. Galway. Martin spoke both Irish and English and both could read and write. Martin was a retired farmer and Elizabeth C. was a school mistress. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 7 rooms and they had a cow house. The landholder was Martin Clesham [sic].

 

House 3: Unoccupied

 

Burke

Patrick (60) was the head of this family and he was married to Agnes (30) and they shared the house with Their daughter, Agnes (1). They were all Church of Ireland and born in Co. Galway. Patrick and Agnes (30) spoke both Irish and English. Patrick could read only. Patrick was a farm labourer. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with 1 room. The landholder was the Irish Church Missions Society.

 

Corbet [sic]

The head of this family was George (70), a widower and he lived with his son Thomas (19). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They could speak both Irish and English and George could not read and Thomas could read only. Both were listed as farm labourers. The house was a 4th class dwelling with 1 room. The landholder was the Irish Church Missions Society.

 

Keely

The widow, Mary (45) was the head of the family in house 6 and she shared the house with 2 of her children, Patrick (19) and Annie (11). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mary and Patrick spoke both Irish and English. Mary could read and write and Patrick and Annie could read and write. Mary was a wash woman, Patrick was an agricultural labourer and Annie was a scholar. The house was a 4th class dwelling with 1 room. The landholder was the Irish Church Missions Society.

 

Ward

The head of the last family was William (40) and he was married to Bridget (38) and the lived in the house with 5 of their children, Mary Anne (11), Michael (9), Patrick (8), Thomas (4) and Lizzie (2). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Bridget spoke Irish and English and Bridget, Mary Anne, Michael and Patrick could read and write. William was a farmer and Mary Anne, Michael and Patrick were scholars. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms and they had a barn. The landholder was William Ward.

 

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Ballymaconry

Denis Conroy (C1846) – Application No. C/16 7820. Ref No. Cen S/11/455. The application was received on 15th December 1916 with an address at that time of Rev. W. M. O’Connell, The Rectory, Clifden Co. Galway. Denis’ parents were listed as being Denis and Honor Conroy (Holland). The address’ for the 1851 search was Kingstown Glebe or Ballymaconry and Knockavalley in the Parish of Omey, in the Barony of Ballynahinch, Co. Galway. The search was returned on 19th December 1916.

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Ballymaconry

The Rev. Hyacinth Darcy was the immediate lessor for this area and leased all the tenements in the townland. Rev. Alexander R.C. Dallas (Trustee) paid £7 for 11 acres, 1 rood and 20 perches of land and £10 for an orphanage, nursery and model farm buildings. William Ward paid 5s for a house and office and Michael Murray 5s for a house. There were 7 tenements on 67 acres and 17 roods of land that were leased to the following: Thomas Ward paid £3 for land and 10s for a house and offices, Patrick Berry and James Murray each paid £3 for land and 5s for houses and offices, John King paid £2 10s for land and 10s for a house, Matthew King paid £3 for land and 10s for a house, Michael Berry paid £2 15s for land and 10s for a house and William Ward £2 10s for land.

[i] Most likely from a previous marriage of Charles G.’s considering they had only been married for 17 years.

[ii] An officer in the church, often overseeing the running of a graveyard.

This page was added on 11/06/2018.

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