Cloghaunard

An Clochán Ard

Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

Townland:                                Cloghaunard

Civil Parish:                              Omey

Barony:                                     Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                         Clifden

District Electoral Division:    Clifden

Area:                                         194.09 acres / 194 acres, 0 roods, 15 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Clifden R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Map

Galway Library for Cloghaunard

Logainm for Cloghaunard

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Cloghaunard

 

1911 Census for Cloghaunard

Overview of Cloghaunard in 1911

The 1911 census shows that there were a total of 6 houses in Cloghaunard and all were occupied and listed as being private dwellings. They were all constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and house 1 had slate, iron or a tiled roof while all the others had only thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. House 1 was a 1st class dwelling and all the others were 3rd class. House 2 had 1 room and 2 windows in the front, houses 3-6 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 2 windows and house 1 had 16 rooms and 10 windows in the front. There were a total of 5 out buildings, 2 cow houses, a piggery, a fowl house and a turf house. There were 39 people in Cloghaunard, 18 males and 21 females. The enumerator for the area was Const. James Barrett.

 

Gorham                                               (additional surnames: Hynes, Owens and Faherty)

The head of the first family in Cloghaunard was Anthony (68) and he lived in the house with his sister, Delia (51), 3 servants, Julia Hynes (19), Janes Hynes (16) and Patrick Faherty (40) and a male nurse, Patrick Owens (26). All were Roman Catholic and Patrick Owens was born in Co. Westmeath and the others were all born in Co. Galway. Patrick Faherty spoke Irish and English and all could read and write. Anthony was a deputy inspector general Royal Navy (retired), Julia was a domestic servant cook, Jane was a domestic servant housemaid, Patrick Owens was a male nurse and Patrick Faherty was a domestic servant raroleuer [sic]. The house was a 1st class dwelling with 16 rooms and they had a cow house, a fowl house and a turf house. The landholder was Anthony Gorham.

 

Conroy

The widow Julia was the head of this family and she shared the house with 5 of her children, Michael (20), Martin (18), Patrick (12), Ellen (9) and Kathleen (6). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Julia could speak Irish and English and Michael and Martin could read and write. Michael and Martin were farm labourers and Patrick, Ellen and Kathleen were scholars. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with 1 room. The landholder was Julia Conroy.

 

Stanton

John (52) was the head of this family and he had been married to Bridget (33) for 11 years and they had had 6 children, 5 of which had survived. Those 5 children were, Catherine (9), Bridget (8), Patk (6), Annie (4) and John Joe (1). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both parents could speak both Irish and English but none could read. John was listed as being a farmer. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms. The landholder was John Staunton.

 

Folan

There were 10 people in this family with John (58) being the head of the family and was married to Penelope (50) and they had been married for 20 years and had had 10 children, of which 9 had survived. Eight of those children were also in the house at that time, Mary (18), Michael (17), Bridget (12), Annie (10), Marget [sic] (9), Sibina [sic] (7), Helena (5), John (3). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John spoke Irish and English and he, Mary and Michael could read and write. John was a farmer and Bridget, Annie, Marget [sic], Sibina [sic], Helena and John (3) were listed as being scholars. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms. The landholder was John Folan.

 

McDonagh                                          (additional surnames: Lyden and Connolly)

Mark (73) was listed as the head of this household and he lived in the house with his widowed sister, Margaret Lyden (80) and a servant Anne Connolly (25). They were all Roman Catholic and they were all born in Co. Galway. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and Mark was a farmer. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms and they had a cow house. The landholder was Mark McDonagh.

 

Needham

The head of the last family in Cloghaunard was Patrick (72) and he had been married to Jane (60) for 40 years and they had had 12 children but only 9 had survived. They shared the house with 5 of their children, Peter, (32), Michael (26), Martin (23), James (16) and Hannagh (13). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick, Jane and Hannagh spoke Irish and English while the others spoke only English. They could all read and write. Patrick was a boot maker, Peter and Michael were postmen and the others all had duties at home. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with 3 rooms and they had a piggery. The landholder was Patk Needham.

 

 

1901 Census for Cloghaunard

Overview of Cloghaunard in 1901

There were a total of 4 houses in the townland of Cloghaunard and all were occupied and listed as being private dwellings. They were all constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls with thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. Houses 1 and 3 were 3rd class dwellings and houses 2 and 4 were 2nd class. Houses 1 and 3 had 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front and houses 2 and 4 had 3 rooms and 3 windows. There were 4 out buildings, a stable, 2 cow houses and a calf house. Twenty-three people were in the townland at that time, 12 females and 11 males. The enumerator for the area was Sergeant Andrew Young.

 

Stanton

John (30) was the head of the first family in Cloghaunard and he was married to Bridget (22). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They could speak both Irish and English but neither could read. John was a farmer and Bridget was a farmer’s wife. The house was 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms. The landholder was John Stanton.

 

Folan                                                   (additional surnames: Stanton and Nee)

Of the 9 members of this household, John (42 was the head and he was married to Penelope (40) and they shared the house with 5 of their children, Mary (7), Michael (6), Catherine (3), Bridget (2) and Anne (1mth) and also in the house at that time was a visitor, Thomas Stanton (28) and a servant, Patrick Nee (60). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John, Penelope, Mary and Patrick spoke Irish and English. Mary could read only and John, Thomas and Patrick could read and write. John was a farmer, Penelope was a farmer’s wife, Thomas was a butcher, Patrick was a farm servant and Mary and Michael were scholars. The house was 2nd class dwelling with 3 rooms. The landholder was John Folan.

 

McDonagh                                          (additional surname: Lydon)

Valentine (72) was listed as the head of this family and he lived in the house with his widowed sister Margaret (67) and his brother, Mark (55). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English but none of the household could read. Valentine and Mark were farmers and Margaret was a housekeeper. The house was 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms and they had a stable, a cow house and a calf house. The landholder was Mark McDonagh.

 

Needham

There were 9 members of this family in the last house in Cloghaunard and Patrick (54) was the head and he was married to Jane (50) and they shared the house with 7 of their children, Peter (23), Bridget (20), Michael (16), Lizzie (13), Martin (11), James (7) and Hannagh (3). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick, Jane, Peter, Bridget and Michael spoke Irish and English while the others spoke only English. All, with the exception of young Hannagh, could read and write. Patrick was a bootmaker, Peter was a postman, Bridget was a housemaid and Michael, Lizzie, Martin and James were scholars. The house was 2nd class dwelling with 3 rooms and they had a cow house. The landholder was Patrick Needham.

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Cloghaunard

Margaret Coyne – Application No. C/21 5635. Ref. No. Cen S/11/449. The application was received on 7th September 1921 with an address at that time of Mr. Thomas O’Toole, Main Street, Cappawhite, Co. Tipperary. Margaret’s parents were Festy and Mary Coyne (Nee). The address for the 1851 search was Cloghaunard, in the parish of Omey, in the Barony of Ballynahinch, Co. Galway. There was a hand written note saying “Michl Nee 70 yrs head, Festy and Mary Coyne married 1843, No return of Margaret”. The search was returned on 10th September 1921.

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Cloghaunard

The tenants of the townland had 91 acres, 2 roods and 4 perches of commonage land that was leased from Thomas Eyre for £2. Mary Toole and Michael Davin Jointly leased 11 acres, 3 roods and 5 perches of land from Thomas Eyre for which Mary paid £1 15s for her share and Michael paid 17s for his and Michael also paid 8s for a house. Edmund Staunton leased a house and office on 10 acres, 3 roods and 34 perches of land from Thomas Eyre for £2 10s for the land and 10s for the buildings, Thomas Courcy leased a house and 8 acres and 19 perches of land from Thomas Eyre for £2 3s for the land and 7s for the house and John Staunton leased a house and garden of 1 rood from Thomas Courcy for 3s for the garden and 7s for the house.

 

Thomas Eyre leased 7 tenements to the following: Michael Needhom [sic] paid £2 10s for 10 acres, 2 roods and 30 perches of land and 10s for a house and office, John Staunton paid £3 5s for 10 acres, 2 roods and 32 perches of land and Martin McGrath paid £4 for 11 acres of land and 10s for a house and office. James Butler leased 2 tenements, the first was a house and office on 4 acres and 30 perches of land for £1 15s for the land and 10s for the buildings and also 15s for 6 acres, 3 roods and 5 perches of land. John Carr paid £1 15s for 3 acres, 1 rood and 25 perches of land and Thomas King paid £2 for 7 acres, 3 roods and 28 perches of land and 10s for a house and office and Anthony Mullins leased a house and office on 12 acres and 1 rood of land for £3 5s for the land and 15s for the buildings. John Lydon leased a house and garden of 1 rood from Anthony Mullins for 3s for the garden and 7s for the house, Mary Faherty leased 2 plots of land from Thomas Eyre, the first of 3 acres and 15 perches for £1 10s and the second was of 6 acres, 3 roods and 15 perches for £15s. The Rev. Alex. R.C. Dallas leased 1 acre, 1 rood and 8 perches of land from Louisa B. Darcy for 5s and James Connolly leased 2 acres and 25 perches of land from Thomas Eyre for 2s. There were also 4 acres, 3 roods and 12 perches of water in the townland.

 

1670 Down Survey for Cloghaunard

The 1670 names for this area was Cloghwallie & Litterdine. The 1641 owner was Owen Fitz Daniell O’Flaherty who was a Catholic and in 1670 the owner was the Catholic, James Darcy. There were 395 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 20 plantation acres of profitable land and 20 plantation acres were forfeited.

 

This page was added on 11/06/2018.

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