Knockbrack

An Cnoc Breac

Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

Cleggan pier
Roger Harrison
Cleggan Pier. The original pier's stone work, that was built around at a later time, can be seen here.
Roger Harrison

Townland:                                Knockbrack

Civil Parish:                              Omey

Barony:                                     Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                         Clifden

District Electoral Division:    Cleggan

Area:                                         202.79 acres / 202 acres, 3 roods, 7 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Clifden R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Map

Galway Library for Knockbrack

Logainm for Knockbrack

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Knockbrack

 

1911 Census for Knockbrack

Overview of Knockbrack in 1911

According to the housing and building return in the 1911 census there were 33 buildings in Knockbrack. Houses 13, 32 and 33 were not inhabited. Houses 11, 12, 14, 15 and 19 were shops, house 16 was the post office, and houses 6, 17 and 20 were public houses. House 31 was the R.I.C. barracks, house 32 was the Cleggan national school and house 33 was the Cleggan P.S. courthouse. All the houses were built with stone, brick or concrete walls. Houses 5, 6, 10, 11, 12, 14, 17, 19, 20, 25, 31, 32 and 33 had slate, iron or tiled roofs with the rest having thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. Houses 10, 17, 19, 20 and 31 were 1st class dwellings, houses 4-6, 9, 12, 14-16, 18, 22, 25 and 29 were 2nd class, house 8 was a 4th class dwelling and the rest were 3rd class dwellings. House 8 had 1 room but no window, house 7 had 1 room and 1 window, houses 1-3, 21, 23, 24, 26, 28 and 30 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, houses 4, 9, 22, 25, 27 and 29 had 2 rooms and 3 windows. House 5 had 2 rooms and 5 windows, house 6 had 3 rooms and 4 windows, house 16 had 3 rooms and 5 windows and houses 11, 12 and 19 had 4 rooms and 6 windows. House 31 had 4 rooms and 7 windows, house 17 had 5 rooms and 7 windows and houses 10 and 20 had 5 rooms and 8 windows. According to the out-offices and farm-steadings return there were a total of 68 out buildings in Knockbrack. They consisted of  19 stables, 2 coach houses, 15 cow houses, 13 piggeries, 2 fowl houses, a barn, a turf house, 2 potato houses, 3 sheds, 9 stores and a forge. The Enumerator’s Abstract form lists a total of 142 people, 72 male and 70 female. 71 male amd 69 female were Roman Catholic with 1 male and 1 female being Presbyterians. The enumerator for the townland was Const. Edmund Moloney.

 

Tierney 

The head of the Tierney family in house 1 was John (46). Also in the house at that time were his siblings Mary (50), Patrick (48) and Honoria (39). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They could all speak both Irish and English but none of them could read. John was a farmer and Patrick was an agricultural labourer. There house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a piggery. John Tierney was the landholder.

 

Connolly 

House 2 was that of the Connolly family and the head of the family was John (67) and his wife Honoria (60) who had been married for 32 years and had had 9 children all of which survived. Also in the house with them was their daughter Alice (16). All wee Roman catholic and born in Co. Galway. John and Honoria spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for Alice which may indicate that she only spoke English. Only John and Alice could read and write. John is listed as being a farmer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a stable, cow house and piggery. John Connolly was the landholder.

 

Burke                         (additional surname: Flaherty)

The head of the Burke family was Patrick (55) and his wife Bridget (48) who had been married for 17 years and had had 7 children of which 6 survived. Also in the house were 4 of their children Patrick (15), Delia (14), Michael (12), Thomas (10) and Patrick’s mother-in-law Catherine Flaherty (73) who was a widow. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick (55), Bridget and Catherine spoke both Irish and English while the others only spoke English. Bridget and Catherine could not read but the others could all read and write. The 2 Patrick’s were listed as being labourers and Delia, Michael and Thomas were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a stable, cow house piggery and fowl house. Patrick Burke was the landholder.

 

Kelly                          (additional surname: Connolly)

House 4 was that of the Kelly family and the head of the family was John (67) and his wife Bridget (66) who had been married for 44 years and had had 7 children all of which survived. Also in the hosue with them at that time were 2 of their grandchildren John Connolly (8) and Matthew Connolly (5). All were Roman Catholic and John Kelly and Bridget were born in Co. Galway while John and Matthew Connolly were born in Scotland. John Kelly and Bridget spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for Connolly brothers so that may indicate that they only spoke English. None of the family could read. John Kelly was listed as being a farmer and John (8) and Matthew were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a cow house. John Kelly was the landholder.

 

King 

The king family only had the 2 members. Head of the family was the widower Michael (73) and his son Henry J. (43). Both were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Michael was listed as speaking both Irish and English but nothing was entered for Henry J. so that may indicate that he only spoke English. Both could read and write. Michael was listed as being a farmer and Henry J. a farmer’s son. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable and a cow house. Henry J. King was the landholder.

 

McEvilly                  (additional surnames: Greenaway and Connolly)

The head of the McEvilly family was Anthony (70) and his wife Mary Anne (64) who had been married for 41 years and had had 9 children of which 7 survived. In the house with them were their son Richard (35), their married daughter, Mary Greenaway (25), Their Daughter Margaret (21) and, a servant, Thomas Connolly (38). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Anthony, Mary Anne and Thomas spoke both Irish and English but nothing was entered for the others so that may indicate that they only spoke English. Anthony and Thomas could not read but the rest could read and write. Anthony was a publican and a farmer, Richaed was a fish merchant, Margaret was a publican’s daughter and Thomas was a general servant. Their house was a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, cow house, piggery and fowl house. Anthony McEvilly was the landholder.

 

Cook

The sole occupant of house 7 was Bridget (50). She was Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. She spoke both Irish and English but could not read. Her house was a 1 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and the landholder was Bridget King.

 

King

The sole occupant of house 8 was Bridget King. She was a Roman catholic and was born in Co. Galway. She spoke Irish and English but could not read. Her house was a 1 rommed, 4th class dwelling and she was the landholder.

 

McLouglin                             (additional surname: Conroy)

The head of the McLoughlin family was the widow Ellen (66). Also in the house with her at that time were her son John (32), daughters, Annie Conroy (30), who was married for 5 years and had had 2 children, Mary (24), Bridgid (23), Nora (21) and her grandchildren Mary Margaret Conroy (4) and Anna Conroy (1). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Apart from Mary Margaret and Anna, They could all speak both Irish and English and could read and write. John was listed as being a fish merchant. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a stable. Ellen McLoughlin was the landholder.

 

King                           (additional surname: Coyne)

The head of the King family was the widow Anne (51) and also in the house were 6 of her children, Thomas (28), Mary (21), John (20), Harry (17), James (14) and Annie J. (6). In addition there was a servant Peter (36). They were all Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Anne and Peter spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the rest of the family so that could indicate that they spoke only English. Apart from Annie J., they could all read and write. Anne was a shopkeeper publican, Thomas and Harry were listed as shopkeeper’s sons, Mary was a shopkeeper’s daughter, John was a farmer, Peter was a servant and James was a scholar. The house they lived in was a 5 roomed, 1st class dwelling with 2 stables, a cow house, a shed and a store. Anne King was the landholder.

 

King                          (additional surnames: Crehan, Thompson and Coyne)

The king family in house 11 had, as their head, the widow Bridget (47). Six of her children lived with her at that time and they were Anthony (21), Mary (19), Pat (17), Festy (14), Stephen (12) and Bridget (10). Also in the house were 2 boarders, Thomas Crehan (53) and Patrick Thompson (29) along with a servant Peter Coyne (50). They were all Roman Catholic and Thomas Crehan was born in Co. Cork, Patrick Thompson was born in Co. Wicklow and the rest were born in Co. Galway. Only Bridget (47) could speak both Irish and English and there was nothing entered for the rest so that could mean that they all could speak only English. They could all read and write. Bridget (47) was a shopkeeper, Anthony, Festy and Stephen were listed as shopkeeper’s sons, Mary and Bridget (10) were shopkeeper’s daughters, Thomas was a fish buyer, Patrick was a plasterer and Peter was a general labourer. The house was a 4 roomed, 1st class dwelling with 2 stables, a cow house, and 2 piggeries. Bridget King was the landholder.

 

King 

The King family in house 12 had 3 members. Head of the family was Honoria (60) who had been married for 36 years and had had 10 children of which 9 had survived. In the house with her were 2 of her sons, Thomas (26) and Festus (14). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Honoria and Festus could speak both Irish and English and all of the family could read and write. Honoria was a shopkeeper, Thomas was a shopkeeper’s son and Festus was a scholar. Their house was a 6 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a shed and store. Honor (sic) King was the landholder.

 

Tool 

The only occupant of house 13 was Patrick (36). Patrick was born in Co. Galway and was Roman Catholic. He spoke Irish and English and could read and write. He was listed as being a tailor. Honor King was the landholder.

 

Davis 

Head of the Davis family in house 14 was Patrick (43) and his wife Nora (40). They had been married for 19 years but had no children listed in this census. They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They both spoke Irish and English and could read and write. Both are listed as shopkeepers. Their house was a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a shed. Patrick Davis was the landholder.

 

Sweeney                               (additional surnames: Hogan, Lacey and Glancy)

Head of the Sweeney family in house 15 was James (34) and his wife Mary Jane (24) who had been married for 2 years and had 1 child. That child also lived in the house with them and he was John Patrick (<2 mths). Also in the house were 2 servants Edward Hogan (22) and Mary Lacey (25) along with a boarder Maggie Jane Glancy (sic) (22). All were Roman Catholic with James, Mary Jane, John Patrick and Mary lacey being born in Co Galway, Edward Hogan being born in Co. Wicklow and Maggie Jane Glancy being born in Co. Roscommon. James, Mary Jane and Maggie Jane spoke both Irish and English but nothing was listed for the others which may indicate that they only spoke English. Apart from John Patrick, they could all read and write. James was a shopkeeper, Edward was a general labourer, Mary was a servant and Maggie Jane was a national school teacher. The house they shared was a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with 2 stores. James Sweeney was the landholder.

 

Murphy

The sole occupant of house 16 was the widow Mary Florence (39). She was born in Wales and was a Roman Catholic. Nothing was entered under “Irish Language” so that could indicate that she only spoke English. She could read and write. Mary Florence was the post mistress. Her house was a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and Bridget Fitzgerald was the landholder.

 

Fitzgerald                              (additional surname: King)

House 17 was that of the Fitzgerald family with the head of the family being Patrick (43) and his wife Bridget (49). They had been married for 19 years and had had 4 children of which 2 had survived. Patrick had 3 step children and they were Anthony P. King (29), Mary Adeline King (24) and Martin Henry King (25). They also had both of their own children in the house and they were Anne Maria (15) and Helen Francis (14). They were all Roman Catholic with Patrick being born in Co. Tipperary and the rest being born in Co. Galway. All could read and write but only Bridget and Anne Maria could speak both Irish and English. Patrick is listed as being a General Merchant, Anthony P. was a fish buyer and linen (sic) and Martin Henry was a boat owner. Their house was a 5 roomed, 1st class dwelling with a stable, coach house, cow house, a piggery and 3 stores. Bridget Fitzgerald was the landholder.

 

Coyne 

Head of the Coyne family in house 18 was Martin (58) and his wife Bridget (60) who had been married for 23 years and had had 5 children all of which survived. Also in the house were 4 of their children Catherine (18), Michael (16), Rosannie (13) and John (12). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin, Bridget, Rosannie and John spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for Catherine and Michael which could indicate that they spoke only English. Apart from Michael, they could all read and write. Martin is listed as being a farmer, Michael, a farmer’s son and Rosannie and John were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, cow house and piggery. Martin Coyne was the landholder.

 

Murphy 

Head of the Murphy family was Michael (26) and his wife Sadie (30) along with Michael’s sister, Bridget (18).  They were all Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. They could all read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Michael was a shopkeeper. Their house was a 4 roomed, 1st class house with a stable. Michael Murphy was the landholder.

 

King                            (additional surname: Geoghegan)

There were only 2 people in house 20 and both were single. The head of the family was Patrick King (52). Also in the house was Joe Geoghegan (20). Both were Roman Catholic with Patrick being born in Co. Galway and Joe being born in Dublin City. Both could read and write with Patrick speaking both Irish and English and Joe speaking only English. Patrick wa a publican and Joe was a general servant domestic. The house they shared was a 5 roomed, 1st class dwelling with a stable and 2 stores. Patrick King was the landholder.

 

King 

Head of the King family in house 21 was James (72) who had been married to his wife Bridget (82) for 43 years and they’d had 5 children of which 4 had survived. Also living in the house was James sister Bridget (76), their son Thomas (31) and their daughter-in-law Annie (32). All spoke both Irish and English but only Thomas and Annie could read and write. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. James was a farmer and Thomas was a farmer and fish buyer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house with a stable. James King was the landholder.

 

Mongan                                 (additional surname: Madara)

Head of the Mongan family was Simon (77), a widower. Also in the house were his children, Mary (49), who had been married for 3 years and had 1 child, his son, James (39) and another daughter, Celia (26). Also in the house were his grandchildren Michael (17), Honoria (9) and Margaret Madara (8). All were Roman Catholic and all, apart from Margaret who was born in America, were born in Co. Galway. Simon and Mary are listed as speaking both Irish and English but nothing was entered for the others which could indicate that they spoke only English. With the exception of Simon, they could all read and write. Simon, James and Michael were all listed as being blacksmiths. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class house with a stable, piggery and forge. Simon Mongan was the landholder.

 

Malley 

There were only 2 members of the Malley family in house 23. The head of the family was John (78) and also in the house was his sister-in-law Bridget (72) who was a widow. Both were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Both spoke Irish and English with John being able to read only. John was a farmer. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house with a stable. John was the landholder.

 

Coyne 

Head of the Coyne family in house 24 was Owen (57) and his wife Sarah (35) who had been married for 16 years and had had 8 children all of which survived. Also living in house with them at that time were 7 of their children Mary Anne (15), Margaret (12), Patrick (10), Peter (8), Michael (7), Hannah (3) and Joseph (1). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Owen and Hannah spoke only English and all the others, with the exception of baby Joseph, spoke both Irish and English. Owen, Hannah and Joseph could not read while all the others could read and write. Owen was a farmer, Mary Anne and Margaret were farmer’s daughters and Patrick, Peter and Michael were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house with a cow house and a piggery. Owen Coyne was the landholder.

 

Coyne                        (additional surname: Rabbett)

The head of this Coyne family was the widow Jane (70) who had given birth to 10 children of which 8 had survived. Also in the house with her were her children Patrick (27), Maggie (22) and Katie (17) and her niece Nora Jane Rabbett (18). All of them, except Nora Jane who was born in Co. Clare, were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Jane is listed as speaking both Irish and English but nothing was entered for the others which may indicate that they spoke only English. All of them could read and write. Patrick was a farmer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class house with a stable, cow house, piggery and potato house. Jane Coyne was the landholder.

 

Mullen 

There were only 2 occupants of house 26 and they were brother and sister Matthias (90) and Mary (79). Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke Irish and English but could not read. Matthias was listed as being a farmer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house with a cow house. Matthias was the landholder.

 

Mullen                         (additional surnames: Gorham)

There were 5 people in house 27 with the head of the family being John (55) and his wife Mary (55) who had been married for 21 years and had had 1 child and she had survived. Living with them in the house were their son-in-law John Gorham (26), their daughter Delia Gorham (17), who had been married for 1 year and had 1 child, and their grandson Joseph (< 1mth). All were Roman Catholic with John Gorham being born in America and the rest being born in Co. Galway. Mary and the 2 Johns spoke Irish and English but nothing was recorded for the others so that may indicate that they spoke only English.  Mary and Joseph could not read but the others could read and write. Both the John’s were farmers. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class house with a cow house, piggery and potato house. John Mullen was the landholder.

 

Cloherty 

House 28 was that of the Cloherty family with Dennis (72) being the head of the family. Also living in the house with him were his wife Honor (73), who he had been married to for 46 years and they had had 5 children, of which 4 survived. In addition, they had 2 of their children living in the house at that time and they were Stephen (27) and Bridget (28). They were all Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Dennis and Honor spoke both Irish and English but could not read while Stephen and Bridget spoke only English and could read and write. Denis was a farmer and Stephen was listed as being a farmer’s son and Bridget was a farmer’s daughter. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a barn. Dennis Cloherty was the landholder.

 

Cosgrove 

The Cosgrove family lived in house 29 and there were 9 of the family living there at that time. Head of the family was Patrick (44) and his wife Ellen (35) who had been married for 14 years and had had 7 children, all of which survived. Thos 7 children were Mary A. (11), Michael J. (9), Maggie (8), Katie E. (5), Patrick (4), Nellie (1) and Thomas (3 mths). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Patrick (44), Ellen, Mary A., Michael J. and Maggie spoke both Irish and English but nothing was recorded for the others which could indicate that they spoke only English. Apart from Patrick (4), Nellie and Thomas, they all could read and write. Patrick (44) was a farmer and Mary A., Michael J., Maggie and Katie E were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a cow house and piggery. The landholder was Patrick Cosgrove.

 

Cloherty 

Head of this Cloherty family was the widow Honor (51) who had given birth to 5 children all of which survived. Living with her at that time were 3 of her children, Joseph (26), Patrick (25) and Ellen (21). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Honor was listed as speaking both Irish and English but nothing was recorded for the others so that may mean that they only spoke English. Honor could not read but the others in the family could all read and write. Honor is listed as being a farmer with Joseph and Patrick being farmer’s sons and Ellen a farmer’s daughter. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a stable. Honor Cloherty was the landholder.

 

R.I.C. Barracks (1) (2)                                 (additional surnames: Young and Moloney)

House 31 in Knockbrack was the R.I.C. barracks. Members of the R.I.C. were usually only identified by their initials although we can see by the household return for house 31.1 that A.Y. was Sergeant Andrew Young (53) and, by looking at the household returns again where the enumerator for this area was a Const. Edmund Moloney, it is likely that E.M. would be him. Andrew Young lived there with his wife Elizabeth (41) and they had been married for 23 years. Elizabeth could read and write, was born in Co. Mayo and was a Presbyterian. A.Y. (Andrew Young) was born in Co. Donegal and was a Presbyterian. He could read and write. He was a farmer’s son before joining the R.I.C.  J.C. (39) was a Roman Catholic who was born in Co. Limerick. He was a farmer’s son before joining the R.I.C. and he could read and write. E.M. (Edmund Moloney) (30) was born in Co. Tipperary and was a Roman Catholic. He could read and write. Before joining the R.I.C. he was a cooper. M.G. (22) was a Roman Catholic and born in Co. Roscommon. He could read and write and before joining the R.I.C. he was a farmer’s son. The build that was the R.I.C. barracks was a 4 roomed, 1st class building with a stable, coach house and turf house. The landholder was Alfred W. Hazell.

 

 

1901 Census for Knockbrack

Overview of Knockbrack in 1901.

According to the 1901 census there were 32 buildings in Knockbrack. House 30, which was the national school, and house 31, which was a shop wee uninhabited at the time of that census. All the houses were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls. Houses 1, 3, 6, 23, 30, 31 and 32 had slate, iron or tiled roofs while the others had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. Houses 6, 9 and 32 were shops, house 31 was the R.I.C. barracks, house 30 was the national school, house 3 was the post office and the rest were private dwellings. Houses 1, 9, 24 and 31 where 1st class dwellings, houses 3, 5, 10, 11, 20, 23, 29 and 32 were 2nd class dwellings, house 28 was a 4th class dwelling and the rest were 3rd class. House 28 had 1 room and no windows, houses 7, 8, 16 and 17 had 1 room and 1 window, house 4 had 2 rooms but no windows, house 13 had 2 rooms and 1 window and houses 2, 12, 14, 15, 18, 19, 21-23 and 25-27 had 2 rooms and 2 windows. Houses 10, 11 and 29 had 2 rooms and 3 windows, house 5 had 2 rooms and 4 windows, house 20 had 3 rooms and 3 windows, house 32 had 3 rooms and 4 windows and houses 24 and 31 had 3 rooms and 8 windows. House 3 had 4 rooms and 3 windows, house 1 had 5 rooms and 6 windows, house 9 had 5 rooms and 8 windows and house 6 had 6 rooms and 7 windows. The out offices and farm-steadings return only lists up to house 15. In those houses there were a total of 29 out houses consisting of 5 stables, a coach house, 11 cow houses, a calf house, 2 piggeries, 5 barns, 2 potato houses and 3 stores. According to the enumerators return there were a total of 167 people in knockbrack, 83 male and 84 female. 76 male and 82 female were Roman Catholic while 7 male and 2 female were Protestant. The enumerator was Const Thos O’Grady.

 

King                          (additional surnames: Sullivan, Coyne, Crehan, Hacknew and Smith)

There were 14 people in house 1 at the time of the 1901 census. Head of the family was Myles (40) and his wife Anne (35). Also in the house were 6 of their children Thomas (16), Michael (14), Mary (12), John (9), Henry (7) and James (5). Also in the house were 3 servants Ellen Sullivan (20), Maggie Coyne (16) and Michael Coyne (16) as well as 3 boarders, Thomas Crehan (35), Anthony Hacknew (57) and Joseph Thos Smith (23). Anthony Hacknew and Joseph Thos Smith were Church of England and were born in England. Thomas Crehan was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Clare and the rest were Roman catholic and born in Co. Galway. Myles, Anne and Thomas Crehan spoke both Irish and English but there was no record entered for the rest of them which could indicate that they spoke only English. Apart from Ellen Sullivan and Michael Coyne, they could all read and write. Myles was recorded as a farmer and shop keeper, Thomas King, Michael king, Mary, John, Henry and James were scholars. Ellen Sullivan and Maggie Coyne were domestic servants, Michael Coyne was a sevant, Thomas Crehan and Anthony Hacknew were fish buyers and Joseph Thos Smith was a fish merchant. The house they lived in was a 5 roomed, 1srt class dwelling with a stable, cow house, calf house, piggery, 2 barns and a store. Myles King was the landholder.

 

King 

Head of the King family in house 2 was Festus (50) and his wife Bridget (35) along with their children Anthony (10), Mary (8), Pat (6), Festy (5) and Stephen (2). They were all Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Festus and Bridget spoke both Irish and English but nothing was recorded for the pothers which could mean that they only spoke English.  Apart from the youngest 2, Festy and Stephen, they could all read and write. Festus is listed as being a farmer, Bridget, as a farmer’s wife and Anthony, Mary, Pat and Festy were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house with 2 barns. Festus King was the landholder.

 

McEvilly                               (additional surnames: O’Connor and Cloonan)

The head of the family in house 3 was Anthony (60) and his wife Maryanne (55). Also in the house were their children Bridget (22), Richard (24), Mary (16), Walter (19), Willie (18) and Maggie (12) along with a boarder Michael O’Connor (19) and a servant, Mary Cloonan (20). All were Roman Catholic and Anthony was born in Co. Mayo, Michael O’Connor was born in Co. Clare and the rest were born in Co. Galway. Anthony, Maryanne and Mary Cloonan could speak both Irish and English but there was no record for the rest which could indicate that they only spoke English. All of them could read and write. Anthony was a farmer and shop keeper, Maryanne was the post mistress, Bridget and Mary were telegraphists, Richard and Michael O’Connor were fish buyers, Walter was a farm labourer, Willie was a rural postman, Maggie was scholar and Mary Cloonan was a domestic servant. Their house was a 4 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable and cow house. Festy King was the landholder.

 

Toole 

The head of the Toole family was Pat (26) and his sister Keough (sic)(16). Both were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Both spoke both Irish and English and both could read and write. Pat was a tailor and Keough was a farmer’s daughter. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Myles King was the landholder.

 

McLoughlin 

The head of the family in house 5 was John (63) and his wife Ellen (52). Also in the house with them at that time were 6 of their children Thomas (29), John (27), James (19), Mary (16), Bridget (14) and Honoria (12). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway.  All could read and write and John, Ellen and Thomas spoke both Irish and English while the others only spoke English. John was a farmer, Thomas was a teacher, John Was a farmer’s son and James, Mary, Bridget and Honoria were scholars.  Their house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a sstable and a cow house. John McLoughlin was the landholder.

 

Fitzgerald                              (additional surnames: King, Lydon and Heanue)

Head of the Fitzgerald family in house 6 was Patrick (33) and his wife Bridget (39). Also in the house was Patrick’s brother-in-law StephaBridget and Stephan n King (50), Stepson, Anthony King (19), step daughter, May King (17), step son, Henry King (16), daughters Anne M. (15) and Helen (4). Also in the house were 2 servants Bridget Lydon (17) and Anthony Heanue (18). All were Roman Catholic and Patrick was born in Co. Tipperary while the rest were born in Co. Galway. Apart from Helen, the whole family could read and write. Bridget (39), Stephan, Bridget Lydon and Anthony Heanue could speak both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others which possibly indicated that they spoke only English. Patrick was a shop keeper, Stephan was a farmer, Anthony King was a student, Mary and Henry were shop assistants, Anne M. and Helen were scholars, Bridget Lydon was a domestic servant and Anthony Heanue was a sorter. The house was a 6 roomed, 1st class dwelling with stable, coach house, cow house, a barn and a store. Patk (sic) Fitzgerald was the landholder.

 

Faherty 

House 7 was the home of mother and daughter, the widow Margaret (60) and Catherine (40). Both were Roman catholic and born in Co. Galway. Both of them spoke both Irish and English but could not read. Margaret was a washer woman and Catherine was a charwoman. Their house was a single roomed, 3rd class dwelling and the landholder was Bridget Lydon.

 

Cooke 

Another mother and daughter house with the head of the family being the widow Mary (40) and Bridget (28). Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke Irish and English but could not read. Mary was a dressmaker and Bridget was a charwoman. The house they shared was a single roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a stable and Bridget Lydon was the landholder.

 

Mongan                                   (additional surnames: Dowd and King)

The head of this household, James Mongan, can only be ascertained from the signature on the bottom of the household return and there are no other details in the main body of that form. Others living in that house were Michael King (40), John Dowd (45), a widower, and Michl (sic) King (32). All three were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. All three spoke Irish and English but only Michael and Michl (sic) could read and write. Michael and John were servants and Michl (sic) was a carpenter. The house they lived in was a 5 roomed, 1st class dwelling with a cow house. James King was the landholder.

 

King 

The head of the King family in house 10 was James (60) and his wife Bridget (60) and living with them were their 2 sons, Thomas (21) and Festus (19) along with James’ sister Bridget (55). All of the family were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but only Thomas and Festus could read and write. James was listed as a farmer, Bridget (60) was a farmer’s wife Thomas and Festus were fishermen and Bridget (55) was a servant. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a cow house. James King was the landholder.

 

Mongan                                 (additional surname: Burke)

Head of the Mongan family in house 11 was Simon (68) and his wife Bridget (60). Also in the house were 4 of their children Mary (35), James (30), Honor (20) and Celia (18) along with their grandson Michael 970 and a boarder Joseph Burke (25). Apart from Michael all the family spoke both Irish and English and all the family except Bridget could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway, except Joseph Burke who was born in Co. Clare, and all were Roman Catholic. Simon was listed as being a blacksmith, Mary, Honor and Celia were blacksmith’s daughters, James was a blacksmith’s son, Michael was a scholar and Joseph was a fish buyer. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a cow house and a store. Simon Mongan was the landholder.

 

Malley 

Head of the Malley family was Bridget (50). Living with her in the house at that time were he children Patrick (20) and Ellen (18) and her brother-in-law John (69). They could all speak Irish and English with Bridget not being able to read, John could read and the other 2 could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Bridget was a farmer, Patrick, a farmer’s son, Ellen, a farmer’s daughter and John a farm servant. The house they shred was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a cow house and piggery. The landholder was Bridget Malley.

 

Coyne                        (additional surname: Conneely)

The head of the Coyne family in house 13 was Owen (45) and his wife Sarah (25). Owen was deaf. In the house with them were 3 of their children Mary Anne (5), Maggie (2) and Patk (sic) John (6mths) along with a visitor Bridget Conneely (14). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Only Sarah was listed as speaking both Irish and English but there were no records for the others which could mean that they only spoke English. Maggie and Patk (sic) John could not read, Owen and Mary Anne could read only and Sarah and Bridget could read and write. Owen was a farmer, Sarah, a farmer’s wife, Mary Anne, Maggie and Bridget were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a cow house and potato house. Owen Coyne was the landholder.

 

Coyne 

House 14 was another Coyne household. The head of this family was Patrick (60) and his wife Jane (55) and also in the house were 4 of their children Patrick (16), Janie (13), Maggie (11) and Katie (7). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All could read and write, Katie spoke English while the rest of the family spoke both Irish and English. Patrick was a farmer, Jane was a farmer’s wife and the children were all scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house with a cow house. Pat Coyne was the landholder.

 

Mullen 

There were only 2 occupants of house 15 and they were brothers Matthias (74) and Gregory (71). Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke Irish and English but could not read. Both of them were farmers. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a cow house and a potato house. The landholder was Matthias Mullen.

 

Sullivan 

Just the husband and wife, Pat (70) and Mary (60) lived in house 16. Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke Irish and English but could not read. Pat was a farm servant. The house they shared was a single roomed, 3rd class house and the landholder was Myles King.

 

Mullen                        (additional surname; Cloherty)

Head of the family was John (40) and his wife Mary (40). Also in the house at that time were their daughter Delia (7) and 2 of Mary’s nieces, Honor Cloherty (7) and Mar (sic) James Cloherty (9). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. All spoke both Irish and English, with Honor able to read only and the rest being able to read and write. John was recorded as a farmer and Delia, Honor and Mar (sic) James were scholars. Their house was a single roomed, 3rd class house and John Mullen was the landholder.

 

Cloherty 

Head of the family in house 18 was Denis (56) and his wife Honor (50) along with 2 of their children Stephen (20) and Bridget (21).All the family spoke Irish and English but only Stephen and Bridget could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Dennis is listed as a farmer, Stephen, as a farmer’s son and Bridget, as a farmer’s daughter. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house and Denis Cloherty was the landholder.

 

Lyden

The sole occupant of house 19 was the widow Margaret (60). She was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. She spoke both Irish and English but could not read. She was listed as a farmer.  Her house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Margaret was the landholder.

 

Coyne 

The Coyne household in house 20 consisted of 10 members. Head of the family was Martin (40) and his wife Bridget (48). In the house with them at that time were their children Honor (10), Kate (8), Michael (6) and Rose (4) along with Bridget’s children[i] John (2)[ii], Martin (22), Mary (20) and Anne (14). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Apart from Michael Rose and John, who may have only spoken English, the family spoke both Irish and English. With the exception of Michael Rose and John, They could all read and write. Martin (40) was a farmer, Honor, Kate and Michael were scholars and Martin (22) was a farm labourer. The house they lived in was a 3 roomed, 2nd class house and Martin Coyne was the landholder.

 

Cloherty 

Head of the Cloherty family in house 21 was Thomas (80) and his wife Catherine (70). Also living in the house was their grandson Patk (sic) (15), Honor (37) described as daughter No. 1 and Patk (sic) (48), described as son No. 1[iii]. As well as those, there were also 2 granddaughters, Bridget (13) and Ellen (11) and another grandson, Joseph (17). They were all Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Thomas, Catherine, Patk (sic) (48) and Honor spoke both Irish and English but could not read while the rest could all read and write but there was no record under the Irish Language column so that may indicate that they only spoke English. Thomas was a farmer, Honor was listed as a farmer’s daughter and Patk (sic) (48) was a farmer’s son while Patk (sic) (15), Bridget and Ellen were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3d class dwelling and Thomas Cloherty was the landholder.

 

Cogrove 

Head of the Cosgrove family was Patt (29) and his wife Ellen (25) who lived in house 22 with their daughter Mary Anne (1). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patt and Ellen spoke both Irish and English and could read and write while Mary Anne spoke only English and could not read. Patt was a boot and shoe maker. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house and Patt Cosgrove was the landholder.

 

Lydon 

The 2 occupants of house 23 were mother and son Bridget (50), who was a widow and Stephen (18). Both were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Both spoke Irish and English with Bridget Being able to read and write and Stephen only able to read. Bridget is listed as being a farmer and Stephen was a farmer’s son. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and Bridget Lydon was the landholder.

 

King                           (additional surnames: Sinclair, Keane and Early)

The head of the King family was Michael (63) and his wife Matilda (58) along with 2 of their children Robert (27) and Amelia (18). Also in the house were boarder, John Sinclair (29), a farm servant, James Keane (17) and a servant, Thomas Early (16). Michael was a Roman Catholic, John Sinclair was Church of England and the rest were Church of Ireland. John Sinclair was born in Scotland and the rest were born in Co. Galway. They could all read and write with Michael, James and Thomas speaking both Irish and English and the rest speaking only English. Michael’s occupation is listed as a farmer etc. (sic), Matilda was a house keeper, Robert was a merchant and farmer, Amelia was a mother’s help, John was a cooper, and James and Thomas were farm servants. The house they shared was a 3 roomed, 1st class dwelling and Michael King was the landholder.

 

Burke                          (additional surname; Flaherty)

House 25 was the Burke household and the head of the family was Patt (40). Also in the house was his wife Bridget (36), 6 of their children, Mary (13), John (10), Pat (5), Bridget (4), Michael (2) and Thomas (1) along with Patt’s mother-in-law Catherine Flaherty (50). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patt and Bridget (36) spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others which could indicate that they spoke only English. Only Patt, Mary and John could read and write. Patt was a farmer and Mary and John were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Pat Burke is listed as the landholder.

 

Connolly 

Head of the family in house 26 was John (50) and his wife Honor (40). Also in the house were their children Michael (17), Anne (15), Onnie (sic) (14), John (12), Maggie (10), Katie (9) and Alice (6). They were all Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. John spoke both Irish and English while the rest only spoke English and all the family could read and write. John was listed as a farmer, Michael, a farmer’s son and the rest of the children were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and John Connolly was the landholder.

 

Burke                          (additional surname: Kelly)

There were only the 2 occupants of house 27. They were the widow Winifred (60) and her grandson Michael Kelly (12). Both were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Both spoke Irish and English but only Michael could read and write. Michael was a labourer. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house with Winifred being the landholder.

 

King

The sole occupant of house 28 was Bridget (60). She was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. She spoke both Irish and English and could read only. Her occupation is listed as a charwoman. The house she lived in was a 1 roomed, 4th class dwelling and the landholder was Festy King.

 

Conaty 

The head of the Conaty family was Patrick (35) and his wife Elizabeth (27). They lived with 2 of her children, Bridget S. (6) and Patrick J. (5). Elizabeth Patrick was born in Co. Clare and the children were born in Co. Galway and all 3 were Roman Catholic. Nothing was entered in the Irish Language column, so that may indicate that they only spoke English. Patrick J. could read only while the other 2 could read and write. Patrick was a constable with the R.I.C. and Bridget and Patrick were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and Patt and Elizabeth Conaty were the landholders.

 

Haran 

Head of the Haran family was John (39) and his wife Minnie J. (32). They lived with their children Mary H. (10), Margaret M. (8), John J. (6), Anne C. (5), Honoria B. (1) Rose A. (3mths). All were Roman Catholic, Minnie J., Margaret M and John J. were born in Co. Kerry, Anne C. was born in Co. Sligo and the rest were born in Co. Galway. Apart from Anne C., Honoria B. and Rose A., they could all read and write. There was nothing entered under the Irish Language so that could indicate that they spoke only English. John was listed in the Military, R.I. Constabulary or Metropolitan Police in Barracks return as an acting sergeant in the R.I.C., Mary H., Margaret M. and John J. were scholars. The house they lived in was a 3 roomed, 1st class dwelling.

 

R.I.C. Barracks                                   (additional surnames: Conaty, Haran and O’Grady)

House 31 was the R.I.C. barracks and members are normally only identified by their initials. In this case we do know the names of three members from the signatures on the bottom of the Conaty and Haran family’s household returns and the fact that Thos. O’Grady was the enumerator for this area. Living in the house were J.H. (John Haran) (39), Patk (sic) Conaty (35), Thos O’Grady (32), P.H. (28) and W.J.H. (23). W.J.H. was a member of the Irish Church and the rest were Roman Catholic, J.H. (John Haran) and P.H. were born in Co. Sligo, Thos O’Grady and W.J.H. were born in Co. Mayo and Patk (sic) was born in Co. Cavan. All could read and write. Before joining the R.I.C. J.H. (John Haran), Patk(sic) Conaty and P.H. were farmer’s sons. The building was a 3 roomed, 1st class dwelling.

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Knockbrack

Thomas Toole – Application No. C/21 2886. Thomas’ application was received on 13/04/1921. The address given at that time was 444 Dunbarton Road Dalinuir (?) N.B. Thomas’ parents are given as Michael and Fanny Toole, Michael was a shoemaker. A handwritten note in the left hand margin lists 3 names and ages, Mary 9, Patt 7, Honor 2 and John (no age). The search was returned on 19/04/1921 with the note “Michael and Fanny Toole married 1840 no return for Thomas”

 

Winifred Coyne – Application No. C/16 5278. Winifreds application was received on 12/09/1916. Her address at the time of application was The Secy L.G.B. Edinburgh. Her parents are listed as John and Mary Coyne (Gallagher) and the head of the family with which the applicant resided was Daniel and Barbara Coyne (Lacy) There were 2 searches done and they were returned on 19/09/1916 with the note to say see over for A and B (the searches). On the second page there are hand written notes as follows:

 

40           35

John and Mary Coyne married 1835

Patt  Michl  Mary  Peter  John  Honoria

12      9         7        5         3         6/12 (6mths)

Martin

Dead                     No return for Winifred

Sheet 34 Knockbrack

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­______________________________________________

No return for Daniel and Barbara Coyne

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Knockbrack

According to Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) a large proportion of Knockbrack was owned by the Rev. Anthony Magee. He leased 194Acres, 2 Roods and 33 Perches of land and buildings between 18 tenants as follows. Patrick Cloherty (Jas) leased a house and land for £3 for the land and 5s for the house, Martin Lynch leased a house and land for £3 for the land and 10s for the house, James price leased a house and land for £3 for the land and 5s for the house. Simon King leased a house and land for £3 for the land and 10s for the house, Margaret Higgins leased a house and land for £3 for the land and 8s for the house and William Cottingham leased a house, office and land for £4 15s for the land and 15s for the buildings. John Maley leased a house and garden for 10s for the land and 15s for the house, Owen Lacey and John McDonnell leased land and house for £3 for the land and 5s for the house each, Samuel Freyer leased a house, office and land £6 for the land and £1 for the buildings and Patrick Conneely leased land and a house for £3 for the land and 7s for the house. John Mongan leased a house, office and land for £6 for the land and 10s for the buildings. Thomas Conys, Pat Cloherty (Denis) and Penelope Mullen each leased land and a house for £3 for the land and 5s for the house each. James Lyden leased land, office and a house for £6 for the land and 10s for the buildings, James Dunne leased land and a house for £3 for the land and 5s for the house, John Coyne leased a house , office and land for £6 for the land and 10s for the buildings. Anthony Davin leased a house and land from James Lyden for £3 for the land and 5s for the house and Thomas Courcey leased a house and land from James Lyden for £1 15s for the land and 5s for the house. Michael Nee leased a house, office and garden with an area of 3 Roods from Francis Giles for 10s for the land and £1 10s for the buildings, Francis Giles leased a house and office from the Rev. Anthony Magee for £1 5s. John Burke leased a house from the Rev. Anthony Magee for 7s, Patrick King leased a house from James Lyden for 7s, Catherine McDonnell leased a house from Simon King for 5s, John Cunningham leased a house from John Mongan for 15s, There was a vacant house belonging to Samuel Freyer that had an annual ratable valuation of 7s, and Mary Mullen leased a house from the Rev. Anthony Magee for 5s annually. Mary Maley had a house that had an annual ratable valuation of 15s, Margaret Mullen leased a house from Thomas Coneys for 5s,Anne Lacey leased a house from Thomas Coneys for 5s, William Manning leased a house from John Mongan for 10s and John Mongan had a vacant house with an annual ratable valuation of 5s. Michael O’Toole leased a house from John Coyne for 5s, Ellen Mullen had a house that had an annual ratable valuation of 5s and the board of customs leased a boat house from John Mongan for 10s.

 

1670 Down Survey for Knockbrack

The names for this area in the Down Survey were Caheigale and Knockbracke. The 1641 owner was Bryan McMurrough O’Flahartye, a Catholic and in 1670 the owner was the protestant John Brown. There were 52 plantation acres of unprofitable land and 64 plantation acres of profitable land with 64 a plantation acres being forfeited.

[i] Probably from a previous marriage.

[ii] Judging by the age, possibly Martin and Bridget’s son and a mistake on the household return form.

[iii] Being described as daughter No.1 and son No. 1 for Honor and Patk could mean that they were Thomas’ children from a previous marriage.

This page was added on 12/06/2018.

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