Clifden (Bridge Street)

An Clochán

Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

Clifden (Bridge Street)

Townland:                                Clifden

Civil Parish:                              Omey

Barony:                                     Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                         Clifden

District Electoral Division:    Clifden

Area:                                         335.93 acres / 335 acres, 3 roods, 28 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Clifden R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Map

Galway Library for Clifden

Logainm for Clifden

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Clifden

 

1911 Census for Bridge Street

Overview of Bridget Street in 1911

There were a total of 10 buildings in Bridge Street, 7 of which were occupied and were listed as being private dwellings. House 8 was a wooden mills and the landholder was the National Bank, house 9 was listed as being the old store and the landholder was Bernard J. Lee and house 10 was an unoccupied private dwelling with the landholder being Bartly King. All the occupied houses were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and had slate, iron or tiled roofs. Houses 1, 4 and 6 were 1st class dwellings and houses 2, 3, 5 and 7 were 2nd class. House 7 had 4 rooms and 3 windows in the front, house 5 had 4 rooms and 4 windows, house 3 had 6 rooms and 4 windows in the front, house 2 had 5 rooms and 5 windows in the front, house 4 had 6 rooms and 7 windows, house 6 had 8 rooms and 6 windows in the front and house 1 had 10 rooms and 9 windows in the front. There were a total of 7 out buildings, a cow house, a turf house, a store, 2 forges, a woolen mill and a coal house. There were 33 people listed in the townland, 14 males and 19 females. The enumerator for the area was Const. Jas Barrett.

 

King                                                    (additional surname: Cloonan)

The head of the first household in Bridge Street was John J. (45) and he was married to Helena (34) and they had been married for 17 years and had had 6 children and 5 of those had survived. They lived with 3 of their daughters, Mary Frances (11), Eveleen [sic] Josephine (7) and Helena Mary (1) and also in the house at that time was a servant, Mary Cloonan (20). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All, apart from Helena Mary, could read and write. John J. was a clerk of fetz [sic] sessions, Mary was a servant and Mary Frances and Eveleen [sic] Josephine were scholars. The house was a 1st class dwelling with 10 rooms. The landholder was Peter O’Toole.

 

Prendergast                                         (additional surname: Younger)

Michael (38) was listed as the head of this family and he had been married to Jane (36) for 14 years and they had had 5 children, of which 4 had survived. Those 4 children also lived in the house and they were Patrick Joseph (13), Michael (11), Mary Josephine (6) and Robert James (4) and also in the house at that time was a boarder, Robert Younger (21). They were all Roman Catholic with Michael, Mary Josephine and Robert James were born in Dublin City Jane was born in Belfast City and Patrick Joseph and Michael were born in Co. Sligo. Patrick Joseph and Michael (11) spoke both Irish and English and all, apart from Robert James, could read and write. Both Michael (38) and Robert were railway guards and the children were all scholars. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 5 rooms. The landholder was Peter O’Toole.

 

Boland

The head of the family in house 3 was James (38) and he was married to Maria (36) and had been for 10 years and had 5 children, Maud (9), Michael James (8), Nellie Josephine (7), Denis (5) and Thomas Stanislaus (2). They were all Roman Catholic with James being born in Co. Sligo, Maria and Maud were born in Co. Mayo and the rest were all born in Co. Galway. Apart from Thomas Stanislaus, they could all read and write. James was a constable in the R.I.C. and the children, apart from Thomas Stanislaus, were scholars. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 6 rooms. The landholder was Peter O’Toole.

 

Waldron                                  (additional surname: Cassidy)

Patrick J. was listed as the head of this household and he shared the house with Mary Cassidy (33), a servant. Both were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Mayo. Patrick J. could speak both Irish and English and Mary spoke only English and both could read and write. Patrick J. was a catholic clergyman and Mary was a domestic servant. The house was a 1st class dwelling with 6 rooms and they had a turf house. The landholder was Bernard J. Lee.

 

O’Connor

There were 4 members of the family in house 5 and the head of the family was Mark (58) ad he was married to Bridget (47) and had been for 21 years and they had had had 5 children and 3 of those had survived. They shared the house with 2 of their sons, John (19) and Mark (11). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and, apart from Bridget, they could all read and write. Both Mark (58) and John were blacksmiths and Mark (11) was a scholar. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 4 rooms and they had a forge. The landholder was Mark O’Connor.

 

O’Connor                                            (additional surname: King)

John (34) was listed as the head of this family and he lived with his wife, Delia (34) and they had been married for 11 years and had had 5 children and 4 of those had survived, Norah (8), John (6), Mary (4) and Delia (2) and also in the house at that time was Delia (34)’s mother, Mary King (71), who was a widow. All were Roman Catholics and Norah and John were born in America and the others were all born in Co. Galway. Delia (34) and Mary (71) spoke Irish and English. John (6), Mary (4) and Delia (2) could not read, Mary (71) could read only and John (34), Delia (34) and Norah could read and write. John (34) was a blacksmith. The house was a 1st class dwelling with 8 rooms and they had a forge. The landholder was John O’Connor.

 

Gough

Michael (36) was the sole occupant of the last house in Bridge Street and he was listed as being married but no wife was mentioned in this entry and no details were given as to for how long or how many children. He was a Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. He could read and write and was listed as being a plumber. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 4 rooms and he had a woolen mill. The landholder was Peter O’Toole.

 

1901 Census for Bridge street

Overview of Bridge Street in 1901

The 1901 census shows that there were 11 houses in bridge Street and that only 6 were occupied. House 10 was a public house, house 11 was a saw mills and all the other houses were listed as being private dwellings. The occupied houses were all constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and houses 1, 2 and 10 had a slate, iron or tiled roof and the rest of the houses only had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. House 10 was a 1st class dwelling, Houses 1 and 2 were 2nd class dwellings, houses 6 and 8 were 3rd class dwellings and house 7 was a 4th class. House 7 had 1 room and no windows, houses 6 and 8 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 2 windows in the front, houses 1 and 2 had 5 rooms and 3 windows in the front and house 10 had 11 rooms and 12 windows in the front. There only 2 out buildings, a cow house and a piggery. At the time of this census there were 14 people in Bridge Street, 7 males and 7 females. The enumerator was Sergeant W. Sullivan.

 

Coyne

John (46) was the only occupant of the first house in Bridge Street and he was born in Clifden, Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. He spoke Irish and English, could read and write and was listed as a cooper-master. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 5 rooms but there was no landholder listed for this property.

 

Keane

John (60) was the head of this family and he was married to Bridget (61) and they shared the house with their daughter, Margaret (20). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English but only Margaret could read and write. John was a farmer and Margaret was a farmer’s daughter. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 5 rooms but there was no landholder listed for this property.

 

Houses 3, 4 and 5 were unoccupied

 

Donohoe

The widow, Anne (68) was the sole occupant of this house and she was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Roscommon. She could not read but could speak both Irish and English and was a fishmonger. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms but there was no landholder listed for this property.

 

McDonough

There was only the 1 person in this house at the time of the census and she was Mary (60) and was unmarried. She was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway. She could not read, but spoke both Irish and English. The house was a 4th class dwelling with 1 room but there was no landholder listed for this property.

 

Connolly                                  (additional surnames: MacDonnell and MacNamarra [sic])

The widow, Bridget (64) was the head of this household and she shared the house with her son, James (19), a niece, Delia MacDonnell (11) and a boarder, Thomas MacNamarra [sic] (40). They were all Roman Catholic and Thomas was born in Co. Clare and all the others were born in Co. Galway. Bridget could not read while all the others could read and write. Bridget was a housekeeper, James was a plasterer, Thomas was a Carpenter and Delia was a scholar. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with 3 rooms and they had a piggery. There was no landholder listed for this property.

 

O Neil

The head of the last family in Bridge Street was Thomas (60) and he was married to Bridget (60) and they shared the house with 2 of their sons, Thomas (26) and Patrick (23). They were all Roman Catholic and Thomas (60) was born in Co. Clare and the others were all born in Connemara, Co. Galway. Thomas (60) and Bridget spoke Irish and English and Thomas (26) and Patrick spoke only English but all could read and write. Thomas (60) was a shopkeeper, Bridget was a spirit merchant, Thomas (26) was a shop assistant and Patrick was a farm servant. The house was a 1st class dwelling with 11 rooms and they had a cow house. There was no landholder listed for this property.

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Clifden

Bridget Beamon – Application No. C/20 9934. Ref No. Cen S/11/441. The application was received on the 3rd of November 1920 with an address at that time of Church hill, Clifden. Bridget’s parents were given as Festy and Ellen Beamon (Ward). The address for the 1851 search was Clifden, in the Parish of Omey, in the Barony of Ballynahinch, Co. Galway. A hand written note in the right hand margin says “Chapel lane Barragh (?) is a street name in Clifden in 1850 and not in list of householders”. The search was returned on the 8th November 1920 with the words “Fam not found”.

Bridget Joyce – Application No. D/10 24144. Ref. No. Cen S/11/443. The application was received on 29th September 1910 with an address of Ballina. Bridget’s parents were John and Bridget Joyce. The address for both 1841 and 1851 searches was Hill St or Bach St, Clifden in the Parish of Omey, in the Barony of Ballynahinch, Co. Galway (seems as though there was some confusion of the address). The search was returned on 7th November 1910 with the words “no trace in Back St. No Hill St. in bundle”

Bridget Nugent – Application No. D/10 24144. Ref. No. Cen S/11/445. Application was received on 29th September 1910 with an address of Ballina. Bridget’s parents were listed as being Geo and Celia Nugent. The address for the 1841 and 1851 searches was Clifden, in the Parish of Omey, in the Barony of Ballynahinch, Co. Galway. The search was returned on 4th November 1910 with the words “Townland uninhabited” and “No Trace in 1841”.

Margaret Walker Steenson [sic] – Application No. C/21 1974. Ref. No. Cen S/11/446. The application was received on 8th March 1921 and had an address of Mrs. M.W. McAdorney [sic], 67 Weir Street, Belfast. Margaret’s parents were James and Jane Steenson (Mahood) and they lived with Blake, Renville Castle, Clifden. The address for the 1851 search was Clifden, Clifden Demesne or Clifden Town, in the Parish of Omey, in the Barony of Ballynahinch, Co. Galway. In the left hand margin the names Mary, Anne, Eliza and Jane were written. The search was returned on the 4th April 1921 with the words “No trace of James and Jane Steenson. Found Thos and Bridget Blake, shoemaker, no trace applicant”.

Peter Higgins (born 1831) – Application No. C/21 7029. Ref. No. Cen S/11/442. The application was received on 10th November 1921with an address at that time of Mr. Timothy Kyne, Ross, Headford, Co. Galway. Peter’s parents were Michael and (?) Higgins. The address for the 1841 search was Clifden Demesne or Clifden Town, in the Parish of Omey, in the Barony of Ballynahinch, Co. Galway. The search was returned on 11th November 1921 with the words “Found Michl and Catherine Higgins married 1809. Children, Michael 15yrs, Mary Nee 7yrs, cousin” and also “This is the only family of Higgins in Clifden”

Mary Leetle [sic]– Application No. C/17 764. Ref. No. Cen S/11/444. The application was received on 22 January 1917. The address at that time was Mrs. Mary Tyrell, West End, Bundoran. Mary’s parents were Pat and Honour Leetle [sic] nee Fahey. The address for the 1851 search was Clifden or Clifden Demesne, in the Parish of Omey, in the Barony of Ballynahinch, Co. Galway. In the right hand margin there was a hand written note saying “Birth certs of persons born in Ireland prior to 1864 are not procurable as public regn. of births in Ireland did not commence until that year.” The application was returned on 26th January 1917 with the words “Not found”.

 

Griffith’s Valuation 91847-1864) for Bridge Street

William McDermott leased a house with a garden of 1acres, 1 rood and 20 perches from Thomas Eyre for which he paid £2 10s for the garden and £8 10s for the house, Rev. Mr. Rudd leased a house from John Reilly for £8 annually, William Doolan [sic] leased a house from William McDermott for £1 15s and Mary King leased a house, again from William McDermott, for 10s. Rev. Mr. Rudd leased offices and a yard from John Reilly for £2, Patrick Toher [sic] leased a house from William McDermott for 8s, Patrick Jennings paid 8s for a house to William McDermott, Daniel Kane leased a house from William McDermott for 7s and there was a vacant house belonging to Francis Mullin that had an annual ratable valuation of 5s. Martin Walsh leased a house from Thomas Eyre for 5s annually, James Thornton leased a house from William McDermott for 15s, John Ganning [sic] leased a house, again from William McDermott, for 5s and William McDermott and John Reilly jointly leased an office with a garden of 38 perches for 15s for the garden and 5s for the office. John Connor paid £2 16s for a house and office to William McDermott, John Darcy leased ruins and a garden of a rood from Thomas Eyre for 10s, Thomas Conroy leased a house from William McDermott for 7s, Mary Toole had a house in fee (for herself) that had an annual ratable valuation of 5s and there was a vacant tuck-mill and garden of 1 rood and 5 perches belonging to Thomas Eyre that had an annual ratable valuation of 15s for the garden and £5 15s for the tuck-mill.

 

This page was added on 03/09/2021.

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