Castleturvin

Civil Parish of Athenry

India Costello/Heritage Office Galway County Council

Castleturvin

Caisleán Tuirbhin, Castleturvin, Castle

Castleturvin was situated 2 miles South/Southwest of Athenry, bounded on the North by Mulpit and Cloughraun and Millpark, on the West by Killeeneen Parish, on the South and on the East by Clamper Park and Turloughalonger townlands.

The Down Survey Map 1642 (pre-Cromwell) under the name Curfarine states that Lord Clanmorris (Catholic) was the owner. The down survey map 1670 (post Cromwell) states that the owner was the Earl of Clanrickard (protestant). There was 167 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 56 plantation acres of profitable land and 56 plantation acres of forfeited land.

O’Donovan’s Field Name books provides various names for this townland Castleturvin and Castle Turvin. This source also states that Turvin Family are the proprietors and the townland contains 388 statute acres, 9/10 ths of which is cultivated and the remainder rocky pasture. This townland is intersected by several roads, and in its S.W end stands a remarkable fort used as a burial ground and in it the ruins of a chapel called Tamplekilmona. 50 acres of this land at its South extremity is subject to winter flood. S.E. of this burial ground is a Cahir at 24 chains distant. Its average height above the sea is from 63 to 102 feet.

Griffith’s Valuation 1855

Francis Bruen leased tenements to Rev. Mark Perrin, Ross Carthy and Alexander Carthrew. Perrin paid £29-0-0 for 27 acres 2 roods 22 perches of houses, offices, and land. Carthy paid £12-15-0 for 48 acres 3 roods 16 perches of land. Carthrew paid £14-5-0 for 54 acres of house, office, and land and 0 acres 5 roods 0 perches of Cottier’s house. Ross Carthy leased tenements to Michael Moran. Moran paid £0-17-0 for 1 acre 3 rood 32 perches of house and land. William Smith leased tenements to Thomas Mahon. Mahon paid £78-0-0 for 83 acres 0 roods 13 perches of land and 112 acres 0 roods 8 perches of house, offices and land. Thomas Mahon leased tenements to Myles Sweeney. Sweeney paid £1-10-0 for 2 acres 0 roods 30 perches of house and land. Francis Bruen and George Cotton leased tenements to John Davock and Michael & Owen Davock. The tenants paid £14-0-0 for 7 acres 2 roods 30 perches of office and land, 9 acres 3 roods 1 perch of land and 2 acres 3 roods 33 perches of land.

1901 Census

There were 9 households in Castleturvin in 1911, all of which were inhabited. There was a population of 45 people, 21 females and 24 males. The heads of households were as follows Michael Fynn, Patrick Healy, Mary Darock, Patrick Darock, Thomas Connelly, John Bright McCoy, Edward Davies, Brigid Claney and Elizabeth Keane. The walls of each dwelling were made from stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of each household was made from iron, tile, slate, thatch, wood, or some other perishable material. The census was collected in April. There were 43 farm buildings altogether.

Michael Fynn [sic] (49) was a farmer married to Mary (48). They lived with their 7 children John (21), Thomas (18), Margaret (17), Kate (14), Patrick (12), Martin (10) and Mary (5). All occupants were Catholic and born in Co. Galway. All children were scholars except for the oldest John who was a farmer and the youngest Mary. All members of the house could read and write apart from Mary. The four eldest members of the household could speak Irish as well as English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front. Michael Fynn owned the land upon which the house was built along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 barn and 1 shed.

Patrick Healy (51) was a farmer and manure merchant married to Jane (41). They lived with their 6 children Brigid (11), Morgan (10), Margaret (9), John (7), Norah (4) and Patrick (3). They also lived with two servants William Gyles (29) and Mary Cloonan (21). All occupants were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. The four eldest children were scholars. Norah, Patrick and Mary could not read. John could read only, and the rest of the house could read and write. John, Norah and Patrick spoke English only however the rest of the house could speak Irish as well English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms and 3 windows in the front. Patrick Healy owned the land upon which the house was built along with 2 stables, 1 cow house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 shed and 1 store.

Mary Darock [sic] (65) was a widowed farmer. She lived with his son Patrick (29) and daughter Sarah (25). All members of the family were farmers. They also had a lodger in the house James Timelton (80) who was a labourer. All occupants were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Mary and Sarah could read and write, Patrick could read, and James could not read. All members of the household could speak Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms and 2 windows. Mary Darock owned the land upon which the house was built along with 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 barn.

Patrick Darock (60) was a farmer married to Margaret (56). They lived with their daughter Cissie (16). All occupants were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Patrick and Cissie could read and write, Margaret could not read. All members of the family could speak Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms and 3 windows. Patrick Darock owned the land upon which the house was built along with 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

Thomas Connelly (38) was a farmer. He lived with his sister Honour (28) who’s occupation was recorded as a farmer servant. They were both Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. All occupants could read and write and speak Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms and 3 windows. Thomas Connelly owned the land upon which the house was built along with 1 stable, 1 cow house and 1 piggery.

John Bright McCoy (41) was a farmer. He belonged to the Church of Ireland. He lived with 3 servants Mary Fleming (50), John Colahan (18) and Margaret Hillary (30). Mary was a domestic servant while John and Margaret were farm servants. The 3 servants were Roman Catholic. All occupants were born in Co. Galway apart from John who was born in Co. Dublin. No member of the house could read or write. Margaret was the only member of the house that could speak Irish as well as English. They lived in a 1st class house with 5 rooms and 9 windows in the front. John owned the land upon which the house was built along with 3 stables, 1 coach house, 1 harness room, 2 cow houses, 1 dairy, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn, 1 turf house and 1 shed.

Edward Davies (83) was a widowed Doctor of Medicine. He lived with his daughter Emily (45) who was a doctor’s daughter and his son St John [sic] (34) who was a doctor’s son. He also lived with his cousin Alfred Coffey (55) and servant John Connors (48). All occupants were born in Co. Galway and Roman Catholic. The 3 eldest members of the household could read and write, Alfred could read only, and John could not read. Only John could speak Irish as well as English. They lived in a 1st class house with 13 rooms and 9 windows in the front. Edward Davies owned the land upon which the house was built along with 2 stables, 1 coach house, 1 harness room, 1 cow house, 1 fowl house, 1 boiling house, 1 turf house and 1 shed.

Brigid Claney (80) was a labourer’s wife. She was a widow and lived with her son Joseph (40). He was a labourer. They were both born in Co. Galway and Roman Catholic. They could not read but they both spoke Irish as well as English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 1 room and 1 window in the front. Patrick Healy owned the land upon which the house was built.

Elizabeth Keane (46) was a widowed farmer. He lived with his 5 children Martin (19), Michael (17), Mary (14), Ellen (11) and James (8). All occupants were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. All the children were scholars apart from the eldest who was a farmer. Only Elizabeth could speak Irish as well as English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front. Elizabeth Keane owned the land upon which the house was built.

 

1911 Census

There were 7 households in Castleturvin in 1911. There was a total population of 40 people, 22 males and 18 females. The census forms which were collected on the 5th of April stated that all the households were private dwellings. The heads of households were as follows Martin Treacy, Michael Finn, Mary Davock, Thomas Connelly, Patrick Davock, Patrick Healy, and John B. McCoy. The walls of each dwelling were made from stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of each household was made from iron, tile, slate, thatch, wood, or some other perishable material. There were 39 farm buildings altogether.

Martin Treacy (37) was a primary school teacher. In 1911 he had been married for 5 years. He had 1 child, who was still living in 1911. He lived with his sister Katherine (21) and Julia (19) who was an assistant schoolteacher. There was a visitor the night of the census Michael Burke (29) who was a farmer. There was also 2 farm servants Laurence Larkin (38) and Peter Flaherty (25). All occupants were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. All members of the household could read and write apart from the 2 servants who could not read. Katherine and Michael were the only 2 members of the house that could not speak Irish as well as English. They lived in a 1st class house with 12 rooms and 18 windows in the front. Martin Treacy owned the land upon which the house was built along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house and 1 barn.

Michael Finn (61) was a farmer married to Mary (60). In 1911 they had been married for 32 years, they had 8 children, 7 of whom were still living in 1911. They lived with 3 of their children, John (30), Patrick (21) and Kate (23). All occupants were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All members of the household could speak Irish as well as English and could also read and write. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front. Michael Finn owned the land upon which the land was built along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 shed.

Mary Davock (78) was a widow. She lived with her son Martin (47) who was a farmer. She also lived with her son Patrick (52) and daughter Anne (30). Anne had 3 children who also lived in the house, Mary (6), Agnes (4) and Sarah (1). In 1911 Anne had been married for 9 years, had 3 children, 3 of whom were still living in 1911. All members of the household were born in Co. Galway apart from Anne who was born in Co. Cavan. All occupants were Roman Catholic. Each family member could read and write apart from Sarah. Only Mary, Martin and Patrick could speak Irish as well as English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front. Mary owned the land upon which the house was built along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Thomas Connolly (55) was a farmer. He lived with his sister Honor (53). They were both Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. They could not read but they could both speak Irish as well as English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms and 3 windows in the front. Thomas owned the land upon which the house was built along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Patrick Davock (76) was a farmer married to Margaret (70). In 1911 they had been married for 48 years, had 5 children, 5 of whom were still living in 1911. They lived with their daughter Celia Jiles (28) and son in law William Jiles (43). In 1911 they had been married for 8 years, had 4 children, 4 of whom were still living. These children lived in the house also, Martin (5), Patrick (7), Ellen (4) and Anthony (1). All occupants were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. William was a farmer and Patrick (7) was a scholar. William, Celia, and Patrick (7) were the only members of the household that could read and write. All occupants could speak Irish and English apart from Anthony. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms and 3 windows in the front. Patrick Davock owned the land upon which the house was built along with 1 stable,1 cow house, 1 piggery and 1 barn.

Patrick Healy (61) was a ? manufacturer farmer married to Jane (51). In 1911 they had been married for 22 years, had 7 children, all of whom were still living in 1911. They lived with their 7 children, Brigid (21), Margaret Mary (20), Morgan Ptr [sic] (18), Norah Maira [sic] (14), Pat Wn [sic] (13) and Peter Joseph (8). All occupants were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. All members of the household could read and write and could speak Irish as well as English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms and 2 windows in the front. Patrick Healy owned the land upon which the house was built along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 barn and 1 shed.

John B McCoy (52) was a farmer married to Kate (30). In 1911 they had been married for 12 years. They were members of the Irish Church. They were both born in Co. Galway. The night of the census they had a visitor Michael Fahey (47). He was born in Co. Galway and was born in Co. Galway. He was also a widow. He was the only member of the house that could speak Irish as well as English. They also lived with a servant James Scott (27) who was a farm labourer. He was born in Co. Dublin. All occupants could read and write. They lived in a 1st class house with 6 rooms and 6 windows in the front. John owned the land upon which the house was built along with 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 1 fowl house, 1 barn and 1 barn.

 

This page was added on 05/04/2022.

No Comments

Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this page!

Add a comment about this page

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *