Rahard

Civil Parish of Athenry

Nuala King, Athenry Active Retirement / Heritage Office Galway County Council

Rahard

Rahard is in the Civil Parish of Athenry

Standard Name: Rahard

Irish Form: Ráth árd                                                               

Translation: high fort

Other form of the Name: Rathard

According to P.W. Joyce  Ra, Ray, Raw, Rath; an ancient fortified residence: the part of a place-name following Ra, Rath, Raheen,  is very often a personal or family name.

Situation

Rahard is situated in the Barony of Athenry, 1¼ miles from Athenry town, bounded on the North by Kingsland South, West by Baunmore, Boyhill and Loobruah, South by Kilconieron Parish and East by Blain.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Book

Records from this source (1860’s) list Rahard as the property of a Mr. Kelly, containing 398 Statute acres, mainly cultivated except for a boggy portion in its eastern extremity. Its value at that time was £161.13. 08 pence.

These townlands share a border with Rahard townland:

Backpark

Blean

Baunmore

Boyhill

Deerpark

Kingsland South

Loobroe

Moyode

The Down Survey Map (1641 pre-Cromwell; 1670 post Cromwell) 

The map of this Barony was destroyed in 1711. No copies have, so far, come to light.

The Down Survey Name is Farkill. The pre-Cromwell Owner was Hubert McWalter Burke (Catholic) and the post-Cromwell Owner was Countess Mountrath (Protestant)

Griffith’s Valuation (1855) records the occupiers as:

John Mangan 15 Acres 2 Roods 5 Perches  Rateable Annual Valuation  £3.15s

John Roonoe 17 Acres 1 Roods 16 Perches  Rateable Annual Valuation  £5.15s

Michael Roonoe Jnr. 13 Acres 3 Roods 38 Perches  Rateable Annual Valuation  £4.15s

Patrick Donohoe 3 Roods 1 Perch  7 shillings and a house 13 shillings Total £1

John Donohoe 14 Acres 2 Roods 38 Perches  Rateable Annual Valuation  £5.15s plus £1 for house and out-office Total £6.15s

James Hynes also £6.15s total

Timothy Hynes 16 Acres 0 Roods 19 Perches  Rateable Annual Valuation  £5 plus £1 for buildings

Patrick Whelan 3 Acres 2 Roods 5 Perches  Rateable Annual Valuation  £1 plus 10 shillings for buildings

Martin Roonoe Snr. 18 Acres 0 Roods 7 Perches  Rateable Annual Valuation  £6.15s plus £1.5s for house and out-office

Martin Roonoe Jnr. 32 Acres 1 Roods 19 Perches  Rateable Annual Valuation  £9 plus £1 for house and out-office – total £10

Mary Higgins 4 Acres 0 Roods 11 Perches  Rateable Annual Valuation 12s plus 8s for house – total £1

Martin King 117 Acres 2 Roods 34 Perches  Rateable Annual Valuation  £38.10s plus £3.10s for 3 cottiers houses and out-offices.

Thomas Kelly was the Immediate Lessor for all of those properties.

John Hanbury 36 Acres 0 Roods 5 Perches Rateable Annual Valuation £13.5s plus £ 1 for house and out-offices – total £14.5s

John Murphy 20 Acres 3 Roods 4 Perches  Rateable Annual Valuation  £7

James Connor 18 Acres 3 roods 14 perches Rateable Annual Valuation  £5.10s plus £1.10 shillings for cottier’s house and out-offices – total £7

Martin King was the Immediate Lessor for 3 – Hanbury, Murphy and Connor.

The total land area was 308 Acres and 38 Roods. The rateable annual valuation of the land was £40 and of the buildings £2.15s.

The description of the tenement was Land, House, Out-office, and Cottier’s house with a total annual rateable valuation of £139.10s.

The Tithe Applotment Books (1827)

The Tithe Applotment Book (Rental Applotment Valuation) has 2 people listed for Rahard:

Patt Donoghue, 68 Acres having  £3. 11s 07½d annual levy

Martin Roono, 149 Acres having £7.15s. 2½d annual levy

Those levies were imposed by the ‘Irish Church’ that being ‘The Church of Ireland’.

Currency then was Pounds, shillings and pence and fractions of pence. £ s d

Census 1901

No records of Census prior to 1901 could be found for Rahard. In 1901 there were 15 dwelling houses in Rahard, each one a private dwelling and inhabited. There were 77 people, 36 males and 41 females. All were Roman Catholics. All were born in Co. Galway unless specified otherwise. Census night was Sunday 31st March 1901 and forms were collected on 8th April 1901. Sgt. M. Davis was the enumerator.

Houses were classed by the construction type, number of rooms and front windows and went from Class 1 to Class 4. All of the householders owned the land on which their houses were built.

The Heads of the Households were Margaret Roonoe, James Rooney, Patrick Rooney, John Rooney, Martin Hynes, Michael King, John Hanberry, Michael Murphy, Ellen Connor, Edward King, Thomas Higgins, Thomas Rooney, Patrick Donohoe, Martin Hynes.

Roonoe’s Margaret Roonoe aged 70 was Head of the Family, describes herself as a cottier and speaks Irish and English as does her sister Mary Roonoe (60). They are both unmarried and cannot read or write. This house had walls which were made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There were 2 out-offices/farm steadings.

James Rooney’s James Rooney, aged 24, was Head of the Family, a farmer. With him were his wife Margaret Rooney (29), his brother Thomas Rooney (25), farmer’s son, unmarried and his sister Mary Rooney, (20), a farmer’s daughter, unmarried. All could read and write and spoke Irish and English. This house had walls which were made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There were 3 out-offices/farm steadings.

Patrick Rooney’s Patrick Rooney (53) was Head of the Family, a farmer. With him were his wife Mary Rooney (45) and his 5 children, Martin (20), a farmer’s son, unmarried; Mary (18), a farmer’s daughter, unmarried; Stephen (15) a scholar; Kate (13), a scholar and John (10) a scholar. All, except Patrick, the head of the house could read and write and Patrick and his wife Mary spoke Irish and English. This house had walls which were made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There were 3 out-offices/farm steadings.

John Rooney’s John Rooney (68) was Head of the Family, and a farmer. With him was his wife Bridget Rooney (70). Neither could read or write and they both spoke Irish and English. This house had walls which were made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second-class house. It had no out-office.

Martin Hynes’s Martin Hynes (60) was Head of Family, was a farmer and widowed. He couldn’t read or write and spoke Irish and English. Living with him were his four children: daughter Bridget (20) housekeeper, and sons Martin (18) and Michael (14) labourers. These were single and could read and write and spoke Irish and English. The youngest, son Patrick (12) was a scholar and spoke only English. This family didn’t specify where they were born other than ‘Ireland’. The family house had walls which were made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or another perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There were 4 out-offices/farm steadings.

Norah Rooney’s Nora Rooney (62), a widow, is Head of the Family. She describes herself as a farmer’s wife. Living with her were her 2 unmarried sons Martin (42) and John (28) both described as farmer’s sons. They can all read and write and speak Irish and English. This family house had walls which were a made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable materials. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second-class house. There were 4 out-offices/farm steadings.

Michael King’s Michael King (64) a farmer, married, was Head of the Family. He couldn’t read or write. With him were his wife Margaret (52), a farmer’s wife who could read and write, his son Patrick (25) unmarried, described as a farmer’s son and daughter Agnes (18), unmarried, a farmer’s daughter. All spoke Irish and English and could read and write – except Michael. This family house had walls which were a made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There were 4 out-offices/farm steadings.

Hanberry’s John Hanberry (59) a farmer, married, was Head of the Family. He could read and write. With him were his wife Mary (47), a farmer’s wife who could not read and write, his daughter Mary Ann (25) unmarried, described as a farmer’s daughter, farmer’s sons John (23), Timothy (20) and 4 scholars, son Martin (17), daughter Kate (16), daughters Bridget (8) and Marget (SIC) (7) (as recorded).  All except the three youngest spoke Irish and English and could read and write – except the youngest Marget.  All were single except the parents. This family house had walls which were made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There were 5 out-offices/farm steadings.

Murphy’s Michael Murphy (46), a farmer, was Head of the family. In the house were: his wife Anne Murphy (30), son John (5), daughter Mary (4), daughter Margaret (3), daughter Bridget (2), and daughter Julia (1). The 2 adults could read and write and spoke Irish and English. In the house also was Bridget Burke (62) a widow, lodger and described as a begger. This family house had walls which were made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There were 3 out-offices/farm steadings.

Connor’s Ellen Connor (65), a widow, and farmer, and was Head of the Family. With her were her 2 unmarried offspring – son Michael Connor (35), a farmer and daughter Norah Connor (22). All 3 could read and write and spoke Irish and English. This family house had walls which were made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 2 front windows and was deemed a third class house. There were 3 out-offices/farm steadings.

Edward King’s Edward King. was Head of the Family, aged 70, a farmer living with his wife Eliza King (54), described as a farmer’s wife. In the house were: his brother Daniel King (60), a farmer, not married; his sons Michael Joe (24), Edward (20), daughters Delia M (26) not married, Lizzie (17), a scholar and Annie M (15) a scholar. All in the house could read and write and spoke Irish and English. This family house had walls which were made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 2 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There were 4 Out-offices/farm steadings.

Higgins’s Thomas Higgins (66) a farmer, was Head of the Family. Living with him were his wife Bridget (50) and their 4 daughters, all scholars: Margaret (17), Julia (13), Bridget (11) and Honoria (7). The parents and children spoke Irish and English and could read and write. The parents- Thomas and Bridget  Snr. could not read or write. There was one out-office / farm-steading.

Thomas Rooney’s Thomas Rooney (60) was Head of the Family, a farmer. With him were his wife Catherine Rooney (39) and their 6 children: Thomas (13) a scholar; Sarah (11), a scholar, Delia (9) a scholar, James (7), a scholar, Mary (5) and Patrick (1). All, except the 2 young children could read and write and Thomas and his wife Catherine spoke Irish and English. This house had walls which were a made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There were 3 out-offices/farm steadings.

Donohoe’s Patrick Donohoe (52) was Head of the Family and a farmer. Living with him were his wife Bridget (48) and their son John (24) a farmer’s son and Catherine (19) a farmer’s daughter, both unmarried. The parents and children spoke Irish and English all and could read and write. This family house had walls which were a made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 2 front windows and was deemed a third class house.  There were 3 out-offices/farm steadings.

Hynes’s Martin Hynes (60) was Head of the Family and a farmer. Living with him were his wife Margaret (55) and their 2 sons Patrick (27) a labourer and Martin  (20) a labourer, both unmarried. The parents and sons spoke Irish and English and the sons could read and write. This family house had walls which were made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 2 front windows and was deemed a third class house.  There were 3 Out-offices/farm steadings.

1911 Census

Constable J. Carroll was the enumerator of the census taken on Sunday 2nd April 1911. The forms were collected on 8th April 2011. There were 15 dwelling houses in Rahard, each one a private dwelling and inhabited. There were 85 people, 44 males and 41 females.  All inhabitants were Roman Catholics. All were born in Co. Galway unless specified otherwise.  The Heads of the Households were: Michael Connors, Michael Murphy, John Hanbury, Elizabeth King, Michael King, Martin Rooney, Thomas Rooney, Patrick Rooney, Martin Hynes, James Rooney, John Rooney, Patrick Donohue, Martin Hynes, Mary Rooney, Thomas Higgins.

Connors’s Michael Connors aged 53, an unmarried farmer was Head of the Family. Living in the house with him were: his sister Norah Connors (35) who was 7 years married; his brother-in-law John Farrell (40) a general labourer; his nephews Michael Farrell (6), Martin Farrell (5). James Farrell (2) and his nieces Mary Farrell (1) and baby Ellen Farrell weeks old. The 3 adults could read and write, and the head of household and his sister spoke Irish and English. 7 There were 5 children born alive and 5 still living. This family house had walls which were a made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 2 front windows and was deemed a third-class house. There were 4 out-offices/farm steadings, stable, cow-house, piggery and a shed.

Murphy’s Michael Murphy (55), a farmer, was Head of the family. In the house were: his wife of 16 years, Annie Murphy (41) and their 11 children ranging in ages from 15 to 1. The eldest son John (14) is described as a farmer’s son and all the others are scholars. The names are self-explanatory for determining son or daughter and are Mary (14), Margaret (13), Bridget (11), Julia (10), Catherine (8,) Thomas (8), Annie (5), Ellen (4), Michael (3), Patrick (1). All except the 4 youngest could read and write and the parents and 2 eldest girls spoke Irish and English. This family house had walls which were made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second-class house. There were 3 Out-offices/farm steadings, stable, cow-house and a piggery.

Hanbury’s John Hanbury (69) a farmer and widower was Head of the Family. He could read and write and spoke Irish and English. (This family name was Hanberry in the 1901 census) With him was his son John (35) a farmer’s son, unmarried; his daughter Brigid (19) unmarried, daughter Margrett Hanbury (15) and Mathew Griffin (22) single, a servant labourer. This family house had walls which were a made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 4 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There were 4 out-offices/farm steadings – stable, cow house, piggery and fowl house.

Elizabeth King’s Elizabeth King (68), a widow was Head of the Family and a farmer. The 7 other occupants of the house were unmarried. They all spoke Irish and English and all except Thomas Laffey could read and write. The household consisted of: Daniel King (73) her brother in law, a farmer; Michael King (33), her son a farmer; Edward King (30), a farmer; Elizabeth King (26) her daughter a national school-teacher; Annie Marie King (23) a daughter; Michael Treacy (26), farm servant and Thomas Laffey (34) an agricultural labourer. This family house had walls which were a made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There were 6 out-offices/farm steadings, stable, cow-house, fowl house, barn, shed and a piggery.

Michael King’s Michael King (76) was Head of the Family and a farmer, could not read or write. With him were Margaret (72) his wife of 53 years who could read and write; Patrick King (38), his son, a farmer and Agnes King (29) his daughter. Patrick and Agnes could read and write, and both were unmarried. They all spoke Irish and English.  Eleven children were born alive and 10 were still living. This family house had walls which were made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or another perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 4 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There were 4 out-offices/farm steadings, stable, cow-house, fowl house and a piggery.

Martin Rooney’s Martin Rooney (50), a farmer, was Head of the Family. With him was his wife of 2 years Margaret (28). Both could read and write; Norah Rooney (70) his mother who couldn’t read and write and John Rooney (28), his brother, a farmer who could read and write. All 4 spoke Irish and English. This family house had walls which were a made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There were 4 out-offices/farm steadings, stable, cow-house, shed and a piggery.

Thomas Rooney’s Thomas Rooney (65), a farmer, was Head of the Family. With him were his wife of 25 years, Catherine (50). Both could read and write and spoke Irish and English. They had 7 children, 6 still living and all 6 were in the house on census night: daughter Sarah Rooney (21); son Thomas (20); son James (18); daughter Mary (15), a scholar; son Patrick (11) a scholar and daughter Bridget (6) a scholar. All but the youngest could read and write and she is recorded as “read only”. None of the children were married. This family house had walls which were a made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There were 4 out-offices/farm steadings, cowhouse, calf house, fowl house and a piggery.

Patrick Rooney’s Patrick Rooney (65), a farmer, was Head of the Family and recorded as being able to read only. The rest of the household could read and write and all spoke Irish and English. With him was his wife of 32 years Mary Rooney (60). They had 6 children, 5 still living and 4 of them were in the house on census night, all single: son Martin (30); son Stephen (25); daughter Kate (22) and son John Rooney (19). Their house had walls which were a made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There were 4 out-offices/farm steadings, stable, cow-house, shed and a piggery.

Hynes’s Martin Hynes (74), a farmer and widower was Head of the Family and recorded as not able to read and write. In the house with him was his: married son Michael (24), daughter in law Mary Hynes (28), unmarried sons Martin (28), Patrick (22) and 2 gran-daughters Ellen Hynes (2) and Infant Norah Hynes. All the adults except martin could read and write. Their house had walls which were a made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There were 3 out-offices/farm steadings, stable, cow-house, and a piggery.

James Rooney’s James Rooney (34), a farmer, was Head of the Family and recorded as able to read and write as were all the adults in the house.  All the adults also spoke Irish and English. With him were his wife of 10 years Margaret Rooney (44). They had 4 children all alive and present on census night. They were daughters Mary B (8); Kathleen (7); Agnes (5) and Teresa Rooney (3) Patrick Lynskey (80) single, a lodger and labourer was there on census night. Their house had walls which were a made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There were 3 Out-offices/farm steadings, stable, cow-house and a piggery.

John Rooney’s John Rooney (78), a labourer, was Head of the Family and recorded as unable to read. Married to Bridget Rooney (80), his wife of 50 years. John Rooney (35), his son was resident. He was a labourer, married and could read and write, as could his mother. There were 7 children born alive and 4 still living.  Their house had walls which were a made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There were no recorded out-offices/farm steadings. Edward madden was the land holder on whose holding the house was situated.

Donohoe’s Patrick Donohoe (62), a farmer and a widower, was Head of the Family and recorded as able to read and write. His son John Donohoe (32), and daughter Catherine Donohoe (26) were with him. Both were single and could read and write and all 3 spoke Irish and English. Their house had walls which were a made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There were 3 out-offices/farm steadings, cow house, piggery and fowl house.

Hynes’s Martin Hynes (71) was Head of the Family, a farmer married for 50 years to his wife Margaret (73). Eight children were born alive and 7 were still living. With them on census night were their 2 unmarried sons Patrick (38) and Martin (32). All the family spoke Irish and English and none could read or write. Their house had walls which were a made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There were 3 out-offices/farm steadings, stable, cow house and a piggery.

Mary Rooney’s Mary Rooney (73), single, was Head of the Family. She could read (but not write) and spoke Irish and English. She was the sole occupant of the house on census night. Her house had walls which were a made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There was 1 out-office/farm steading, a fowl house.

Higgins’s Thomas Higgins (75) was Head of the Family, a farmer and married to his wife Margaret Higgins (62). Six children were born alive and 6 still living. Completed years of the present marriage is recorded as 3. Neither of them can read or write. His two single daughters were in the house on census night, Bridget (22) and Norah Higgins (18) and they can read and write. All four spoke Irish and English. Their house had walls which were a made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of the dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material. It had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and was deemed a second class house. There was 1 out-offices/farm steading – a turf house.

This page was added on 25/08/2022.

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