Knockaunglass

Civil Parish of Athenry

Nuala King, Athenry Active Retirement / Heritage Office Galway County Council

Knockaunglass

Civil Parish of Athenry

Standard Name: Knockaunglass

Irish Form: Cnocán Glas

Translation: green hillock

Other forms of the Name: Knoakaungloss

Knockaneglasse

Situation

Knockaunglass is situated in the Barony of Athenry, on the East side of the town, bounded on the North by Gurteenacra, West by Athenry town, South by Baunmore and East by Kingsland South. It is bounded on the West by the road from Athenry to Kiltulla and the road from Athenry to Craughwell passes through the West side of the townland parallel to the Town wall of Athenry.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Book

Records from this source (1860’s) list Knockaunglass as the property of Lord Oranmore, containing 29 Statute acres, all under tillage.

These townlands share a border with Knocaunglass townland:

Athenry

Baunmore

Gorteenacra

Kingsland South

The Down Survey Map (1641 pre-Cromwell;1670 post Cromwell) 

This source gives the owner as Earl of Clanrickard (Protestant) both before and after Cromwell. Down Survey Name was Knockanaknuchouse. The map of this Barony was destroyed in 1711. No copies have, so far, come to light.

Griffith’s Valuation (1855) records the Immediate Lessor as James Finn and the Tenants with land and cottier houses as:

Patrick Grealy             14 Acres. 1Rood.                    £13.10.00

Timothy Kinneen         9 Acres 27 Perches                 £5.00.00

Thomas Whelan.         5 Acres 2 Roods 14 Perches £2.15. 00

Griffith’s Valuation gives the Area as 20 Acres 0 Roods and 1 Perch and the Total Annual Valuation of the Rateable Property land and buildings was £22. 05s. 00d £1 being buildings valuation (£-Pound s-shilling d -pence)

The Tithe Applotment Books 

The Tithe Applotment Book (Rental Applotment Valuation) for Knockaunglass (1827) has one name – (Mrs.) E. Cooney who paid £1.2.01 in tax annually for her 17 acres.  The Tithes were calculated using pounds, shillings, and pence (£ s d).

Census 1901

No records of Census prior to 1901 could be found for Knockaunglass. In 1901, there were 8 dwelling houses in Knockaunglass, all inhabited and each one a private dwelling. There were 40 people, 19 males and 21 females. All were Roman Catholics. The walls of all the houses were a made of stone, brick, or concrete. Houses were classed by the construction type, number of rooms and front windows. There was one 1st Class House, six 3rd Class Houses and one 4th Class House (that being without any front window and having 1 room). On 4th May 2022 there is no available record on out-offices and farm-steading (i.e no Form B2)

The heads of the households were as follows: Catherine Connors; Thomas Fleming; Patrick O’Brien; Margaret Grogan; Mary Murphy; Patrick Martin; Thomas Madden and William Ward. The census was taken on 31st March and collected on 1st April 1901. Sergt. M. Davis was the enumerator. There was just one distinct family in each of the houses.

Connors

Catherine Connors, (50), was head of the household, married and a Charwoman. She could not read or write and spoke Irish and English. Her daughter Mary aged 18, not married and her son Patrick aged 12 were the occupants on census night. The two children could read and write. All three were born in Co. Galway. They lived in a house with 1 room that had no front window. The house had walls of stone, brick or concrete, The roof was made of thatch, wood or other perishable material. One room was occupied, and it had no front window or out offices. It was a fourth-class house. None of the occupants were sick on Census night.

Fleming’s

Thomas Fleming aged 70 was the head of the household and was born in Co.Galway. He was a widower and a labourer, could read but not write and spoke Irish and English. His daughter Bridget aged 40 could read and write and spoke Irish and English. She was a chairwoman, unmarried, and was born in Co. Galway. One room was occupied and there was no out office. The house had walls of stone, brick or concrete, The roof was made of thatch, wood or other perishable material. It had one front window and was a third-class house. None of the occupants were sick on Census night.

O’Brien’s

Patrick O’Brien, aged 70 was the head of the household, married and was born in Co. Galway as were all members of the family. He was a domestic servant, could not read or write and spoke Irish and English. His wife Bridget (50), also a domestic servant could not read or write and spoke Irish and English. Daughter Mary, aged 21, not able to read, a domestic servant and unmarried; Patrick O’Brien 19 a son, domestic servant can read and write. Bridget O’Brien 12 a scholar can read and write. Martin O’Brien (9) son could read and write.  The next 3 daughters were scholars and could not read or write, Margaret (7), Annie (6), Ellen (5) and Maria (4).  Son William (3) and Thomas (1) could not read and write. Two rooms were occupied by this family of 12. The house had walls of stone, brick or concrete, had one front window and the roof was made of thatch, wood or other perishable material. It had one front window and there was no out office. It was a third-class house. None of the occupants were sick on census night.

Grogan’s

Margaret Grogan, (60), was a widow and domestic servant and could not read and write. Her son Michael (26) not married was a labourer, daughter Bridget (22), not married, could read and write and son John (14) a scholar could read and write. They lived in a house with 1 room that had one front window. The house had walls of stone, brick or concrete, The roof was made of thatch, wood or other perishable material. One room was occupied, and it had no out offices. It was a third-class house. There was no occupant sick on census night.

Murphy’s

Mary Murphy (50) was head of the family. A widow and domestic servant who could not read and write and spoke Irish and English. Her daughter Mary (22), not married was a domestic servant, could not read and write; daughter Margaret (15), could read and write and was not employed; Son Patrick (10), a scholar could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway. They lived in a house with 1 front window. The house had walls of stone, brick or concrete, The roof was made of thatch, wood or other perishable material. Two rooms were occupied, and it had no out offices. It was a third-class house. There was no occupant sick on census night.

Martin’s

Patrick Martin (91) was Head of Household, could not read and records himself as a cottier. His wife Margaret (62), could “read only.” They both spoke Irish and English and were born in Co. Galway. The house had walls of stone, brick or concrete and had 2 front windows.  The roof was made of thatch, wood or other perishable material. Two rooms were occupied, and it had no out offices. It was a third-class house. There was no occupant sick on census night.

Madden’s

Thomas Madden, (67) was Head of Household and a widower. He was a farmer and Smith and could “read only” and spoke Irish and English. Living with him on census night were Bridget Madden (25), his unmarried daughter who could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Kate (23), daughter, not married could read and write and spoke Irish and English. son Edward Madden, (21), could read and write, spoke Irish and English and was a Smith. The 4 Maddens were born in Co. Galway. James Kelly, (70), servant and labourer could not read. James McHugh (40), could read and write, was a servant and labourer. Martin Murphy, (23), servant and a Smith; James Fleming, (23), a servant and Smith could read and write. John O’Shea, (17) could read and write and was a servant and a Smith and was born in Co. Cork. Sarah Connors, (14), could read and write and was a servant and household attendant. The entire household spoke Irish and English. The walls of the house were made of brick, stone or concrete and the roof was slate, iron or tin. It had 7 front windows and the household occupied 7 rooms. There were 5 out-offices. It was a first-class house. There was no occupant sick on census night.

Ward’s

William Ward (61) was Head of Household, his occupation a bottle and rag gatherer. He could not read. His wife Margaret Ward (55) could not read. She too was a bottle and rag gatherer and could speak Irish and English. Daughter Mary Ward (17) not married was also a bottle and rag gatherer. All were born in Co. Galway. The walls of the house were made of brick, stone or concrete and the roof was made of slate, iron or tin. It had 1 front window and the household occupied 1 room. There were no Out-offices. It was a third-class house.

1911 Census

Constable J. Carroll was the enumerator of the census taken on Sunday 2nd April 1911. The forms were collected on 13th April 2011. Six dwelling houses are listed, with 10 people living in the townland, four males and six females. All were one-room houses. The walls of all the houses were a made of stone, brick, or concrete. Houses were classed by the construction type, number of rooms and front windows. The roof of each of the six houses was made of thatch, wood or some other perishable material and were classed as 1st to 4th class. Thomas Hynes was the Landholder on whose holding all six houses were built. No one in the townland was recorded as “sick”. All the residents were Roman Catholic.

Hynes’s Thomas Hynes (48) was Head of Family, Catherine (37), his wife of 10 years and his mother Bridget Hynes (79), a widow were in the house. No children, dead or alive were recorded. Thomas and his mother couldn’t read. Thomas was a labourer and his wife a domestic servant. All three were Roman Catholics, born in Co. Galway and Thomas spoke Irish and English. The house had no front window and one room was occupied by the family. It was a 4th class house. There was one outhouse – a turf house.

Martin’s Michael Martin (62), was head of the household. He was blind. Married for 39 years to Norah. They were born in Co. Galway. Two children are recorded as being born alive yet no living children were recorded. They couldn’t read. The house had one front window and they occupied one room. It was a third-class house. It had no outhouse.

Donohoe’s Norah Donohoe (84), a widow was Head of Household. She couldn’t read and spoke Irish and English. The house had one room, no front window and was a fourth-class house. It had no outhouse.

Connors Patrick Connors (84) was Head of Household. He was married for 26 years to his wife Catherine Connors (71). Neither of them could read and both spoke Irish and English. They had 4 children born alive and 3 living. The house had one room, no front window and was a fourth-class house. It had no outhouse.

Kenny’s Patrick Kenny (65) was Head of Household. He was Single and a labourer. He spoke Irish and English and could not read or write. The house had one room, no front window and was a fourth-class house. It had no outhouse.

Fleming’s Bridget Fleming (60) was Head of the Household. She was single, a general servant and could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Like her neighbours, she lived in a one-roomed 4th class house with no front window and no out-house.

This page was added on 25/08/2022.

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