Gorteenacra / Gorteenacre

Civil Parish of Athenry

Nuala King, Athenry Active Retirement / Heritage Office Galway County Council

Gorteenacra / Gorteenacre

Civil Parish of Athenry

Standard Name: Gorteenacra

Irish Form: Goirtín Acra

Translation: little field of the acre

Other forms of the name: Gorteennockra (in BS Sketch Map)

Gurteenacre (Vestry Book 1826)

Situation

Gorteenacra is situated in the Barony of Athenry, on the North East side of Athenry town, bounded on the North by Caheroyan, South by Knocaunglass and the road to Kiltullagh; East by Kingsland North and South. At the South West angle is the gate on the old town wall called Laragate.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Book

Records from this source (1860’s) list Gurteenacra as the property of Lord Oranmore, containing 60 Statute acres, all under tillage.

These townland of Gorteenacra shares a border with 4 other townlands:

Athenry

Caheroyan

Kingsland North and South

Knocaunglass

The Down Survey Map (1641 pre-Cromwell;1670 post Cromwell) 

This source gives the owner as Sir Richard Blake (Catholic) before Cromwell and Robert Blake (Protestant) after Cromwell. Down Survey Name was Knockanaknuchouse. The map of this Barony was destroyed in 1711. No copies have, so far, come to light.

Griffith’s Valuation (1855) records the Occupiers as Timothy Kinneen, Rev. Peter Curran and Patrick Hennely. The immediate Lessors were Directors of the Alliance Insurance Company.

Timothy Kinneen 55 Acres 1 Rood and 32 Perches and a Cottier’s house, Annual rateable value of land and property £40.

Rev. Peter Curran 3 Acres and £3.10 Annual rateable valuation

Patrick Hennely 1 Acre 2 Roods and 20 Perches. Annual rateable valuation £2.15.

Griffith’s Valuation gives the Area as 60 Acres, 0 Roods and 12 Perches and the Total Annual Valuation of the Rateable Property land and buildings was £46. 05s. 00d £2 being buildings valuation. Money, at that time was Pounds, shillings and pence and fractions of pence.

The Tithe Applotment Books 

The Tithe Applotment Book (Rental Applotment Valuation) for Gorteenacra (1827) has one name – Patrick Fitzpatrick with 35½ Acres and annual tithes of £2.11shillings.

Census

No records of Census prior to 1901 could be found for Gurteenacre on May 15th, 2022.

Census 1901

There was only one family – Hollands, recorded in Gurteenacras at census time 1901. There were 4 people, 2 males and 2 females. All were Roman Catholic. Houses were classed by the construction type, number of rooms and front windows from first to fourth class.

Holland’s

Dominick Holland (35) was Head of the household, married and a Shepherd. His wife, Bridget (34) was also a Shepherd. Neither one could read or write. His son Patrick Holland (20), a Car Man unmarried not able to read or write and daughter Sarah (16), not married and described as a Shepherd’s daughter could read completed the household. Patrick and Sarah spoke Irish and English. The walls of all the house were made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof was made of thatch, wood or other perishable material. It had 2 front windows and the family occupied 2 rooms. It was a third class dwelling. Mrs P. Lambert was the landholder on whose holding the house was situated.

1911 Census

There were five households and 35 people, 18 male and 17 female in Gurteenacre when the Census were taken on Sunday 2nd April 1911. Census forms were collected on 12th April 2011. Constable John Carroll was the enumerator. All residents were Roman Catholics.

Madden’s   Edward Madden (32) was Head of the Household. He could read and write, was a farmer and blacksmith and spoke Irish and English. His wife, Bridget Madden (26) could read and write. Their children were – daughters Mary (3), Sish (2) and son Thomas (8 months). Mary Madden, Edward’s sister (32), Single, could read and write and spoke Irish and English was in the house. Others there on Census night were James Kelly, (74) Single, a General Servant who couldn’t read or write; Patrick Egan (36) Single, a Servant Blacksmith, could read and write; Frank Hougan (28) Single, a Servant, could read and write; Annie O’Brien (16) a Domestic Servant could read and write; Michael Coyan (40) Single, a Lodger, a Tea Agent could read and was born in Co. Mayo; Peter Nolan (36), single, a general servant, couldn’t read or write; Thomas Mannion (47) single, a general servant, couldn’t read or write and Mathew Donaghe (38) Single, a Farm Servant, couldn’t read or write. There was no occupant sick on Census night and no child of the marriage had died. The walls of the house were made of brick, stone or concrete and the roof was slate, iron or tin. It had 8 front windows and the household occupied 10 rooms. There were 5 Out-offices – a stable, cow house, piggery, shed and a forge. It was a first-class house.

Dominick Holland (60) was Head of the household, married and a Farmer living with Bridget (72), his wife of 33 years. Neither one could read or write. His daughter Sarah (26) not married and described as a Housekeeper could read and write. All three spoke Irish and English. Three children were born alive and 3 are still living. The house had 2 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms. The walls of all the house were made of stone, brick, or concrete and the roof was slate, iron or tin. It was a second-class house. There was one out-house – a cow house.

McDermott’s

Patrick McDermott (41) was Head of the Family, married and a Farmer living with Catherine (37), his wife of 14 years.  Neither one could read or write. His daughters Mary (12) and Honoria (1) along with his mother-in-law Honoria Nolan (64) a widow and his sister-in-law, Agnus (23) not married were in the house. None of the occupants could read or write. His mother-in-law spoke Irish and English. Patrick, the head of family was born in Co. Roscommon, a Roman Catholic and all the others were born in Co. Galway and all were Roman Catholics. Two children were born alive and still living. The house had 2 front windows and they occupied 3 rooms. The walls of all the house were made of stone, brick, or concrete and the roof was slate, iron or tin. It was a second class house. There was one out-house – a cow house.

O’Brien’s Patrick O’Brien, aged 73 was the Head of the Family, married and was born in Co. Galway as were all members of the family. He was a Labourer, could not read or write and spoke Irish and English. His wife of 27 years, Bridget (65), could not read or write and also spoke Irish and English, as did the entire household. Daughter Mary, aged 23, was not able to read and unmarried; Martin O’Brien (20) his son cannot read and write and is a Labourer and Single. Daughter Margaret, a labourer aged 17 and Single couldn’t read or write. His next daughter Ellie 16 and two sons William (15) and Thomas (13) were scholars and could read and write, three rooms were occupied by this family of 8. The house had walls of stone, brick or concrete, had two front window and the roof was made of slate, iron or tin. There was one out office – a shed. It was a second-class house. None of the occupants were sick on Census night. Ten children were born alive and ten were still living.

Reilly’s John Reilly (36) was Head of the Household, a Labourer, Married, born in Co. Galway and unable to read or write. With him were three lodgers: Patrick Fitzharris,(75) Married, a Butler, born in Co. Wexford and unable to read or write; Catherine Fitzharris (66) Married 21 years and Patrick Fitzharris (20) Single, a Labourer and able to read and write. Catherine and Patrick Junior were born in Co. Galway. Three rooms were occupied. The house had walls of stone, brick or concrete, had two front window and the roof was made of slate, iron or tin. There was one out office – a shed. It was a second-class house. None of the occupants were sick on Census night. One child was born alive, and one was still living.

This page was added on 25/08/2022.

No Comments

Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this page!

Add a comment about this page

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *