Kingsland South

Civil Parish of Athenry

Nuala King, Athenry Active Retirement / Heritage Office Galway County Council

Kingsland South

Kingsland South is in the Civil Parish of Athenry

Standard Name: Kingsland

Irish Form: Talamh a Rígh

Translation: land of the king

Other forms of the Name: Kingsland

Talamh a’ Rígh

Tholloaghree

Kings Land (County Map)

Kingsland (Vestry Book1826)

Situation

Kingsland South is situated in the Barony of Athenry, half a mile East of Athenry bounded on the North by Kingsland North, West by Knockaunglass and South by Baunmore and Rathard (Rahard).

O’Donovan’s Field Name Book

Records from this source (1860’s) list Kingsland South as the property of Lord Oranmore, containing 236 Statute acres all under tillage and bounded on the North by the road from Athenry to Kiltulla. The townlands that share a border with Kingsland South are:

Baunmore

Blean

Gloves Middle

Gorteenacra

Kingsland North

Knockaunglass

Pollacapple

Rahard

It is bounded on the South by the road from Athenry to Kiltulla.

The Down Survey Map (1641 pre-Cromwell; 1670 post Cromwell) 

The map of this Barony was destroyed in 1711. No copies have, so far, come to light.

The Down Survey Name is Ahrim. The pre-Cromwell Owner was Sir Richard Blake (Catholic), and the post-Cromwell Owner was Sir Thomas Newcomen (Protestant).

Griffith’s Valuation (1855) records the occupiers as:

Patrick Linskey

William Linskey

Thomas Clasby

Patrick Clasby

Joseph Barrett

James Barrett

Anthony O’Brien

The Immediate Lessors were the Directors of the Alliance Insurance Co.

The total land area was 236 Acres and 10 Perches. The rateable valuation of the land was £100 and of the buildings £5.15s a total of £105.15.0

The “description of the tenements” was Land, Houses, Out-offices.

The Tithe Applotment Books (1827)

The Tithe Applotment Book (Rental Applotment Valuation) has an entry for Kingsland but not specifically Kingsland South. Five people are listed:

Martin Broderick, 6 Acres having 9s 04d annual levy

Patrick Fitzpatrick, 12 Acres having 18s. 9d annual levy

John Clasby, 60 Acres having £2.17s.01d annual levy

Edward Lynsky 62 Acres having £2.8s.9d annual levy

Thady Hanley 54 Acres £2.16.3 annual levy

The Tithes were calculated using pounds, shillings, and pence (£ s d).

Census 1901

No records of Census prior to 1901 could be found for Kingsland South. There were 3 dwelling houses in Kingsland South, each one a private dwelling and inhabited. There were 24 people, 12 males and 12 females.  All were Roman Catholics.  Census night was Sunday 31st March 1901 and forms were collected on 18th April 1901.

The Heads of the Families were William Clasby, Michael Lynskey, and Martin Healy.

The 3 houses had walls which were made of stone, brick, or concrete. The roof of each dwelling was made of thatch, wood, or other perishable material.  Houses were classed by the construction type, number of rooms, and front windows and went from Class 1 to Class 4. Each of the houses had 3 rooms and 3 front windows and were 2nd class houses.

Clasby’s William Clasby, aged 82 was Head of the Family. He was a farmer, could not read and write and was not married. With him were his nephew Peter Clasby (44) a farmer married and could read and write; Sarah Clasby (30) his nephew’s wife and their 3 daughters Bridgit (4), Margaret (3) and Anne (2). The three adults spoke Irish and English. All were born in Co. Galway.

Lynskey’s Michael Lynskey (80) was Head of the Family. He was a farmer, married and could read and write and spoke Irish and English. All 8 members of that household could read and write and spoke Irish and English. In the house on census night were: John Lynskey (70) Michael’s unmarried brother, a farmer: Bridgit Lynskey (50) wife; Mary Lynskey (21) farmer’s daughter, not married; Patrick Lynskey (20) farmer’s son, not married; Celia Lynskey (18) farmer’s daughter, not married; William Lynskey (13) a son, a scholar, not married; Bridgid Lynskey (9) daughter, not married and a scholar. All were born in Co. Galway.

Healy’s Martin Healy (55) was Head of the Family. He was a farmer, married and could read and spoke Irish and English as did his wife. All other members of that household could read and write. In the house on census night were: Catherin Healy (49) a farmer’s wife; Mary J. (24), farmer’s daughter, unmarried; John Healy (22) farmer’s son not married; Thomas Healy (20) farmer’s son, not married; Delia Healy (18) daughter and scholar, not married; Michael Healy (17) a son, a scholar, not married; Dominick Healy (15), a son, not married and a scholar; Timothy Healy (12) a son and scholar and Celia Healy (9), a daughter and a scholar. All were born in Co. Galway.

1911 Census

Constable J. Carroll was the enumerator of the census taken on Sunday 2nd April 1911. The forms were collected on 12th April 2011. Three dwelling houses are listed, with 13 people living in the townland, six males and seven females, all Roman Catholics. The Heads of the Households were Catherine Healy, Peter Clasby and Delia Lynskey. The 3 houses were made of brick or stone and the roof of each was made of thatch, wood or other perishable material. Healys and Lynskeys had 3 front windows and occupied 3 rooms and were 2nd class houses. Clasbys occupied 4 rooms and had one front window. The house was deemed a third-class house.

Healy’s Catherine Healy (58) a widow, was Head of Family and a farmer. She could read and write as could all members of her household. She spoke Irish and English. In the house on census night were: John Healy (32) her farming son, not married; Michael Healy (26) a farming son, not married; Delia Healy (27) a daughter, not married; Timothy Healy (22) a farming son, not married. All were born in Co. Galway. Healys had 4 out-office and farm steadings, a stable, a cow house, a barn, and a piggery.

Clasby’s Peter Clasby (54) a widower was Head of the Family, a farmer, could read and write and spoke Irish and English. In the house on census night were his 2 daughters, both scholars Bridgid Clasby (15) and Margaret Clasby (14). All were born in Co. Galway. Clasbys had 3 out-office and farm steadings, a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

Lynskey’s Delia Lynskey (65) was Head of the Family, a widow and a farmer. She could read and write and spoke Irish and English. In the house on census night were: Patrick Lynskey (29), her unmarried farming son; Celia Lynskey (28) her unmarried daughter; William Lynskey (23) her farming, unmarried son and Bridgid Lynskey (18) her unmarried daughter. All could read and write and all, but the youngest could speak Irish and English. There were 2 out-offices, a stable and a piggery.

This page was added on 25/08/2022.

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