Mulpit

Civil Parish of Athenry

Anna Bourke/Galway County Council Heritage office

Mulpit

Mul Péat, Mulpit

Mulpit is situated 7½ miles S. S.W. of Athenry, bounded on the North by Newford, West by Cloghraun, South by Millpark and Castleturvin and East by Farranablanky and Furzepark.

It is the property of John Blakeny, Esq., containing 181.3 statute acres, the whole under cultivation. It is intersected by two roads one of which forms the South bounds. of the townland for a short distance. There is near its Northern extremity a house the residence of – Taylor, Esq., called Mulpit House. The general surface of this land varies from 83 to 103 feet above the sea.

The Down Survey map provides no record of this townland and indicates the map of the barony of Athenry was destroyed in 1711.

 

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books provide various spellings of this townland: Mulpit, Mul Péth
Mul Péath, Mulpit B.S. Sketch Map, Mulpit Barony Map, Mulpit County Map, Mulpit Vestry Book 1826.

Griffith’s Valuation

According to Griffith’s Valuation 1855, Francis Bruen [SIC] leased tenements to Timothy Cornealy [SIC], Walter Taylor, and Patrick Waldron.

Timothy Cornealy [SIC] paid £71-15-0 in tax for his house, offices, and land of 184 acres, and 34 perches. Walter Taylor’s House offices, corn-mill, and land of 41 acres, 2 roods, and 11 perches cost him £29-5-0 in tax. Patrick Waldron paid a tax of £3-13-0 for his house, offices, and land comprised of 6 acres. The total annual valuation of rateable property in the townland of Mulpit was £104-13-0.

1901 Census

There were 3 households in Mulpit in 1901. 9 individuals were listed as head of household. A total of 14 inhabitants were recorded, 8 male and 6 female. All the residents in this townland were from County Galway but Hannah Baptie [SIC] who originated from County Leitrim and Waldron Rose who was from Co. Mayo. Everyone was also Roman Catholic but the MacCoy [SIC] family who were members of the church of Ireland. The census forms which were collected on the 6th of April showed that all the houses were inhabited and were private dwellings. All of the walls of the houses were made from stone, brick or concrete. The roofs were made from slate, iron, or tiles.

Margaret M Hynes (24) was a married farmer. She lived with her single brother Michael (39), niece Mary H Glynn (13), and unmarried farm labourer, servant Pat Heane [SIC] (23). Everyone was able to read and write. Margaret M Hynes was able to speak both Irish and English while the rest of the inhabitance spoke English only. They lived in a 5-roomed, 2nd class house with 4 front windows. Margaret owned the land her house, 2 stables, 2 cow houses, calf house, piggery, barn, and shed resided.

Hector MacCoy (67) was a married farmer. He lived with his wife Kate (65), single son Robert Hector (27), and unmarried domestic servant Hannah Baptie [SIC] (54). They were all members of the Church of Ireland and Kate was from Galway town while Hannah Baptie originated from County Leitrim. They were all able to read and write. They dwelled within an 8-roomed, 1st class house with 6 front windows. Trecloir Macbay [SIC] owned the holding his coach house, cow house, piggery, barn, shed and 2 stables dwelled.

Michael Waldron (38) was a farmer. He resided with his wife Rose (33), sons Patrick Joe (7), John Martin (3), Willie B (1) and daughter Nora May (5). Waldron Rose was from Co. Mayo. Michael and his wife Rose were able to read and write while Patrick Joe read-only and the rest of the children could do neither. Michael spoke both Irish and English but there was no language listed for any of the children suggesting they spoke English only. All 6 resided in a 4 roomed, 2nd class house with 6 front windows. Michael owned the terrain in which his stable, cow house and piggery were situated.

1911 Census

There were 3 households in Mulpit in 1911. There were 19 inhabitants, 10 were male and 9 were female. All the occupants were Roman Catholic except for Robert, Harriet, Kate and George McCoy who were members of the Irish Church. Everyone also originated from County Galway, but Peter Flannery from England and Rose Waldron from Co Mayo. The heads of households were: Robert McCoy, Margaret Flannery, and Michael Waldron. The census forms, which were collected on the 6th April 1911, showed that all the houses were listed as private dwellings. Each house roof was made of slate, iron, or tiles, while all of the walls were made from stone, brick, or concrete.

Robert McCoy (36) was a farmer. He had been married for 1 year to Harriet (24). He also lived with his daughter Kate (1), farm labourer, servant George and domestic servant Mary Connor (17). Everyone in this household but Mary Connor was a member of the Irish Church. Everyone was able to read and write but Kate. They lived in a 7 roomed, 1st class house with 7 front windows. Robert owned the land his house, stable, cow house, calf house, piggery, fowl house, barn, turf house, potato house, and shed resided.

Margaret Flannery (34) was married for 4 years and was a farmer. He lived with his son Peter (4), brother Michael Hynes (45), farm labourer, servant William McGagh (45). Everyone was able to read and write but Peter. Margaret was cited as being from Ireland and Peter’s birthplace was England. They inhabited a 3 roomed, 3rd class house, with 1 front window. She owned the land her house, stable, cow house, calf house, piggery, fowl house, barn, and shed resided.

Michael Waldron (48) was a farmer. He had been married for 18 years and had 8 children with Rose (44) from Co Mayo. He also lived with his sons Patrick (17), John (13), William (11), and James (1) along with his daughters Nora (15), Ellen (7), Mary (5), and Cecelia (9). Everyone was able to read and write but James. Michael and his wife spoke both Irish and English and there were no languages listed for the children suggesting they spoke English only. They lived in a 3 roomed, 2nd class house with 2 front windows. Michael Waldron owned the land his house resided, along with his stable, cow house, piggery, barn

This page was added on 16/05/2022.

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