Moyveela

Civil Parish of Athenry

Anna Bourke/Galway County Council Heritage office

Moyveela

Maigh Mhaola, Moyveela

Moyveela is situated 3½ miles West of Athenry, bounded on the North by Palmestown, West by Derrydonnelbeg, Shantholla and Stradbally Parish, East and South by Coldwood and Derrydonnel More.

It is the property of Judge Vandeleur, containing 893½ statute acres, 7/8 ths of which is cultivated. It is bounded on the North by the road from Athenry to Galway and intersected by the road from Galway to Dublin, near its S.W. angle stands the ruins of an old castle, S.W. of which 24 chains is a fort, a Trigl. Station stands North of the Dublin road nearly central. West of the townland and an eighth part of the townland is heathy and rocky pasture. The general surface varies from 45 to 125 feet above the level of the sea.

The Down Survey map provides no record of this townland and indicates the map of the barony of Athenry was destroyed in 1711.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books provide various spellings of this townland: Moyveela, Magh Mhaola, Moyveela B S. Sketch Map, Meeveela Barony Map, Meeveela County Map, Moyvaela O’Flaherty in Ogygia, Movilla Vestry Book 1826.

Tithe Applotment Books

The Tithe Applotment books show that John Bourke occupied 49 ½ acres of land. He paid £2-11-6 ¾ in tax. William Mitchell ‘s 22 ½ acres cost him £1-15-2 in tax. John Bourke paid £0-7-0 ½ for his 6 ¾ acres of land. Bernard Browne paid £15-7-9 ¾ for his 217 acres of terrain. Thos Fahy’s 39 ½ acres of land cost him £2-1-1 ¾ in tax. Patrick Fitzpatrick paid £3-18-1 ½ in tax for his 50 acres of land. The tithes were calculated using pounds, shillings, and pence.

 

Griffith’s Valuation

According to Griffith’s Valuation 1855, Thos C Vandeleur leased tenements to James Kinneen and James Kaveney [SIC]. Andrew Browne also leased tenements to Thomas Fahy and the constabulary force.

James Kinneen paid £212 in tax for a house, offices and land of 230 acres and 31 perches along with two other sections of land comprised of 143 acres, 2 roods, and 16 perches and 36 acres, 2 roods and 8 perches. James Kaveney’s house cost £1 in tax. The M. G. W. Railway Co. paid a tax of £3 for a Railway on 5 acres and 20 perches of land. Thomas C. Vandeleur had numerous sections of land he paid tax for, along with a caretaker’s house and offices. In total, he paid £43 for 135 acres, 2 roods, and 31 perches of land. Thomas Fahy’s house, offices, and land of 40 acres and 7 perches came to £22 in tax. The Constabulary Force paid a tax of £5 for their police barrack, office and a small garden. Lastly, Andrew Browne paid £179 in tax for 2 caretaker houses, 2 offices and 2 sections of land encompassing 5s acres, 1 rood, and 36 perches and 230 acres, 3 roods and 24 perches. The total annual valuation of rateable property in the townland was £465-0-0.

1901 Census

There were 5 households in Moyveela in 1901. 5 individuals were listed as head of household. A total of 33 inhabitants were recorded, 26 male and 7 female. All the residents in this townland were from County Galway and Roman Catholic, but Edward C Robinson who was a protestant, and from County Westmeath, and Annie Mary Martin Hogan whose birthplace was Co Mayo. The census forms which were collected on the 1st of April showed that all the houses were inhabited and were private dwellings. All of the walls of the houses were made from stone, brick, or concrete. The roofs were made from slates, iron, or tiles except for Michael Fahy’s roof which was made from thatch, wood, or another perishable material.

Patrick Fahy (32) was a single farmer. He lived with his 3 unmarried farmer brothers Thomas (28), Michael (23), and Owen (20) along with their 2 servants Patrick Cahill (17), a farm servant, and Norah Cooley (16) a house servant. Everyone was able to read and write. Everyone also spoke English while Patrick could speak both Irish and English. They lived in a 4-roomed, 2nd class house with 2 front windows. Robert McDonald owned the land his house resided on, along with his stable, cow house, calf house, piggery, fowl house, boiling house, barn, turf house, and shed.

Michael Fahy (66) was a married farmer. He lived with his wife Mary (44), sons Thomas (21), Michael (18), Patrick (17), Daniel (16), Timothy (15), Peter (13), James (11), William (8), Christopher (6), and Andrew (4) and daughter Mary (10). Everyone was able to read and write but Andrew, who could read-only. Only Michael and his wife were listed as speaking both Irish and English there were no languages listed for the rest of the children suggesting they spoke English only. All 13 lived in a 4-roomed, 2nd class house with 3 front windows. Michael owned the holding his house, stable, cow house, piggery, and barn resided.

Edward C Robinson (73) was an unmarried farmer. He was a member of the Irish Church and was born in Westmeath. He lived with his 2 servants Patrick Donhoe a general servant and Margaret Murray (53) a domestic servant. Both Males were able to read and write while Margaret could not. Only Margaret spoke both Irish and English the other 2 inhabitants had no language listed for them in the census suggesting they spoke English only. They lived in a 7 roomed, 1st class house with 5 front windows. Edward owned the land his house was situated on along with a stable, coach house, harness room, cow house, piggery, fowl house and shed.

Honor Mullin (50) was a widowed herd. She lived with her single daughter Julia (30) and unmarried sons John (25), Thomas (22), and Martin (22). Honor could not read and write, Julia a housekeeper could read only, and all 3 labourer sons could both read and write. Everyone spoke both Irish and English. They lived in a 4 roomed, 2nd class house, with 4 front windows. Rodger Shaughnessy owned the terrain her house, stable, cow house and shed resided.

Annie Mary Martin Hogan (30) was married and originated from Co Mayo. There was no language listed for her suggesting she spoke English only and she was able to read and write. On the form, it cites that she was the wife of the head of the household. In Form B Martin Hogan is cited as being the head of household. She lived in a R.S Barrack with her Sergeant Husband.

M.H (46) was a Sergeant R.S Constabulary. He lived with M.W (43), O.G (34), J.J (31), and M.M (25) who were all Constables in the R.S Constabulary. Everyone was able to read and write and all but J.J were farmer’s sons before enlisting. Everyone was married but J.J and M.M. Both M.H and M.W originated from County Clare while O.G came from Cavan, J.J from Donegal, and M.M from Roscommon. There was no language listed for any of the inhabitance but M.W who could speak both Irish and English, suggesting they spoke English only. They lived in a 1st class house with 7 rooms ad 7 front windows. Mrs.  O Connor Henshy [SIC] owned the land his barracks and shed resided.

1911 Census

There were 7 households in Moyveela in 1911. There were 46 inhabitants, 31 were male and 15 were female. All the occupants were Roman Catholic and originated from County Galway. The heads of households were: T.Mc, Thomas Shaughnessy, Michael Fahy, Honor Mullins, Patrick Fahy, and James Casey. The census forms, which were collected on the 5th and 6th April 1911, showed that all the houses were listed as private dwellings but 2 that were uninhabited on Roger Shaughnessy’s and Martin Beaty’s land. Each house roof was made of tiles, slate, or iron but Michael Fahy and James Casey’s which was made of thatch, wood, or another perishable material. All of the walls were made from stone, brick, or concrete.

Mc.T (46) was a Sergeant R.S Constabulary. He was originally from Wexford and was a widower. He dwelled with J.FG (29) from Galway, C.P (30) originating from Leitrim, C.M.F (29) from Sligo, J.F (24) from Mayo, R,O (28) came from Cavan, B.FF (26) originated from Dublin, B.M’s birthplace was Kerry (22), and J.J was from Co Cork (25). Everyone was able to read and write and was single. Mc J and J.FG were shop assistants before enlisting while C.P,J.F, R.O, M.B, and J.J were farmers sons and B.FF was a gardener and C.MF was a scholar. All 9 lived in the 1st class Barracks, with 5 rooms and 7 windows. Thomas Mc Evory [SIC] was the head of household while Maude O Connor Hinely [SIC] owned the land the barracks was situated on.

Thomas Shaughnessy (79) was a married farmer. He had been married to 38 years to Mary (70). Out of the 7 children they had together 6 was still alive in 1911. He also lived with his single sons Thomas (37) a farmer and Rodger a labourer (32), and unmarried daughters Sabrina (34), Margaret (30), and Ellie (26), along with his 2 farmer single brothers Rodger (83), and Nicholas (75) and a farm servant John Mullin (30). Everyone was able to read and write but Nicholas Shaughnessy and John Mullin. Everyone but John Mullin was also able to speak both Irish and English. There was no language listed for John Mullin suggesting he spoke English only. They all inhabited a 1st class house with 11 rooms and 5 front windows. Thomas owned the terrain in which his house resided along with his stable, coach house, cow house, harness room, calf house, dairy, piggery, fowl house, boiling house, barn, turf shed, and shed.

Michael Fahy (70) was a married farmer. Mary (51) had been married to him for 31 years and they had 12 children together. They lived with their single sons Thomas (30), Michael (17), James (21), and William (19) all of which were listed as labourers, Christi (16), and Andrew (15) scholars, along with their unmarried daughter Hollie (18). Everyone was able to read and write but only Michael (70) and Mary were cited as speaking both Irish and English. There was no language listed for the rest of the inhabitance suggesting they spoke English only. All 9 lived within a 2nd class house with 5 rooms and 3 front windows. Michael owned the land his house, stable, cow house, calf house, fowl house, boiling house, barn, potato house and 2 sheds were located.

Honor Mullins (72) was a widower. She dwelled with her single daughter Julia (38), sons John (35) a married farmer, Thomas (29) an unmarried labourer, and Martin (29) a single herd. Everyone spoke both Irish and English and all 3 males could read and write while the women could not. They inhabited a 4 roomed, 2nd class house with 2 front windows. Honor Owned the terrain her house, stable, cow house, piggery, and barn resided.

Patrick Fahy (44) was a herd. He was married for 7 years and had 4 children with Mary-Anne (29) at the time of the census. They lived with their daughters May [SIC] (6), Gretta (4), and Ellen James (5 months) and son John (2) along with their unmarried farm servant Pat Shaughnessy (28). All 3 adults spoke both Irish and English while there was no language listed for the children suggesting they spoke English only. All 3 adults were able to read and write while May and Gretta could read-only, and the rest of the children could do neither. They lived in a 2nd class house with 4 rooms, and 2 front windows. Michael Costello owned the land his house was located along with a stable, cow house, piggery, fowl house, and barn.

James Casey (50) was a farmer. He had been married for 16 years at the time of the census to Mary (45). They resided with their 2 sons Michael (15) a labourer and Martin (11) and 2 daughters Mary (13) and Kate (8). Both James and Michael were unable to read or write but the rest of the family could do both. There were no languages listed for anyone suggesting everyone in the family spoke English only. They lived in a 3 roomed, 2nd class house with 3 front windows. James owned the land his house, stable, barn, and 2 sheds resided.

This page was added on 16/05/2022.

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