Ardbear

Aird Bhéarra

Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

Ardbear Pier and Bay
Roger Harrison
Ardbear Cemetry
Roger Harrison

Townland:                               Ardbear

Civil Parish:                            Moyrus

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                         Clifden

District Electoral Division:    Clifden

Area:                                       387.97 acres / 387 acres, 3 roods, 34 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Clifden R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Ardbear  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Ardbear

Logainm for Ardbear

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Ardbear

 

1911 Census for Ardbear

Overview of Ardbear in 1911

The townland of Ardbear had a total of 21 houses and all were occupied and listed as being private dwellings. They were all built with stone, brick or concrete walls and houses 1, 2, 5, 6, 9-18, 20 and 21 had slate, iron or tiled roofs while houses, 3, 4, 7, 8 and 19 had only thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofs. Houses 1, 9, 11, 13 and 14 were first class dwellings, houses 2, 10, 12 and 16-21 were 2nd class dwellings and the others were all 3rd class. Houses 6 and 7 had 1 room and 1 window, houses 3-5, 8, 10 and 19 had between 2 and 4 rooms and 2 windows in the front, houses 12 and 21 had 3 rooms and 3 windows in the front and houses 15-18 had 5 rooms and 4 windows in the front. Houses 2 and 20 had 5 or 6 rooms and 5 windows, house 1 had 9 rooms and 8 windows, house 14 had 12 rooms and 6 windows, house 9 had 12 rooms and 7 windows in the front and house 11 had 14 rooms and 8 windows in the front. The out-offices and farm-steadings return shows that there were a total of 42 out buildings consisting of 7 stables, 4 coach houses, a harness room, 8 cow houses, a piggery, 4 fowl houses, a barn, 9 turf houses, a workshop, 5 sheds and a forge. There were a total of 113 people in the townland, 62 males and 51 females. The enumerator for the area was Const. Jas Barrett.

 

Emerson                                              (additional surname: Donelan [sic])

The head of the first family in Ardbear was Geoffrey R. (56) and he had been married to Mary (47) for 29 years and they had had 9 children and 7 of those had survived. They lived in the house with 5 of those children, Maddie (23), Timothy (21), Lucius (15), Frank (10) and Sidney (6) and also in the house was a niece, Henrietta Donelan [sic] (11). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic, except for Geoffrey R., who was born in Co. Clare. The whole family could read and write. Geoffrey R. was an architect, Maddie was a P O assistant, Timothy was a builder and the other children were all scholars. The house they all lived in was a 1st class dwelling with 9 rooms and they also had a fowl house and a shed. The landholder was Geoffrey Emmerson.

 

Harley

The head of the Harley family in house 2 was Henry (54) and was married to Susanna (46) and they had been married for 25 years and had had 10 children, all of whom had survived. They shared the house with 6 of those children and they were, Mary (24), William (13), Dorcas (10), Robert (6), Violet (5) and Olive (8mths). They were all members of the Church of Ireland and Henry was born in Cork, Susanna was born in Yorkshire, Mary, William and Dorcas were born in Co. Mayo and Robert, Violet and Olive were born in Co. Galway. Apart from Violet and Olive, they could all read and write. Henry was an ex const. in the R.I.C. and William, Dorcas, Robert and Violet were scholars. The house they all lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 5 rooms and they also had a turf house. The landholder was Henry Harley.

 

Crimmons [sic]                                               (additional surname: Coyne)

The widow Mary (86) was the head of this household and she shared the house with a lodger, Mary Coyne (75), also a widow. They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They could speak both Irish and English but neither could read. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms. The landholder was Peter O’Toole.

 

Flaherty                                               (additional surname: Coyne)

The head of this family was James (90) and he had been married to Honor (76) for 60 years and they had had 9 children and 5 of those had survived. Also in the house was their widowed daughter, Bridget Coyne (56) and their granddaughter, Annie Coyne (14). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English with the exception of Annie, who only spoke English. Only Annie could read and write. James was a farmer, Bridget was a boarder and Annie was a scholar. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms and they had a stable and a cow house. The landholder was Jas Flaherty.

 

Jennings

The widow, Mary (72) was listed as the head of the family in house 5 and she had been married for 52 years and had had 3 children but only 2 had survived, John (23) and Martin (20). Mary spoke both Irish and English, but only the sons could read and write. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mary was an old age pensioner and John was a labourer. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms and they had a shed. The landholder was Peter O’Toole.

 

Conroy

The sole occupant of house 6 was Patrick (72), a widower and he was a Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. He could read only, spoke both Irish and English and was an old age pensioner. The house he lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with 1 room. The landholder was Peter O’Toole.

 

Gannon

Festus (73), a widower, was the only person in this house and he was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway. He spoke Irish and English and was a farmer. The house he lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with 1 room and he had a cow house. The landholder was Festus Gannon.

 

Coyne

The head of this Coyne family in house 8 was Martin (45) and he had been married to Ellen (44) for 22 years and they had had 9 children, all of whom had survived. They lived in the house with 8 of those children, Patrick (19), Bridget (16), John (14), Kate (12), Martin Henry (9), Thomas F. (8), Helena (4) and Stephen (2). They were all Catholic and all the children were born in Clifden but no place of birth was recorded for the parents. Martin and Ellen spoke Irish and English and all the children spoke only English. Martin, Helena and Stephen could not read but all the others could read and write. Martin was a caretaker, Patrick was an engineer attendant and Kate Martin Henry and Thomas F. were scholars. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with 3 rooms and they had a cow house. The landholder was Jas O’Sullivan.

 

O’Sullivan                              (additional surnames: Stevens, Rawlins, Hogan and Brien)

James (76) was listed as the head of this household and he was married to Henrietta Maud (42) and they had been married for 5 years but had no children. They lived in the house with a chauffeur, Alfred Stevens (34) who had been married for 5 years and had 3 children, but there was no mention of his wife in this entry. Also in the house at that time were 3 servants, Richard Irwin Rawlins (18), Henrietta Hogan (19) and Sophia Brien (16). They were all Protestant Episcopal and James was born in Co. Kerry, Henrietta Maud was born in Co. Galway, Alfred was born in London, Richard Irwin was born in Queens County[i], Henrietta was born in Co. Carlow and Sophia was born in Dublin. They could all read and write and James could speak both Irish and English while the others spoke only English. James was a bishop, Alfred was a chauffeur and Richard Irwin, Henrietta and Sophia were servants. The house they lived in was a 1st class dwelling with 12 rooms and they had a coach house, a fowl house and a turf house. The landholder was James O’Sullivan.

 

King

Patrick (68) was listed as the head of this family and he had been married to Mary Anne (40) for 20 years and in that time they had had 7 children, of which 6 had survived. Those 6 children also lived in the house with them and they were, Bridget (15), Thomas (13), John (11), Pat (9), Mary Anne (7) and Michael (4). They were all Roman Catholics and Patrick and Mary Anne (40) were born in Carna, Co. Galway, but there was no place of birth for the children. Patrick and Mary Anne spoke both Irish and English. Mary Anne (7) and Michael could not read, Pat could read only and the others could all read and write. Patrick was an agricultural labourer. The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 2 rooms and they had a turf house. The landholder was Frank Connolly.

 

McDonnell                              (additional surnames: Mannion and Lowney)

There were 14 members of this household and at the head was Joseph R. (53) and he was married to Mary (42) and had been for 17 years and they had had 7 children, all of whom had survived. Six of those children lived with them and they were, Charles Edwd [sic] (16), Josephina (12), Joseph (10), Mary Veronica (8), Helen Jane (6) and Dorothy Mary Patricia (1). Also in the house were Joseph R.’s mother, Mary (87), his sister, Josephine (52), his brother, Harry (50) and 3 servants, Joseph McDonnell (23), Thomas Mannion (17), Margaret Lowney (19). They were all Roman Catholic and Mary (42) was born in Wales, Charles Edwd [sic] and Josephina were born in England, Margaret was born in Co. Cork and the others were all born in Co. Galway. Joseph R., Charles Edwd [sic], Mary (87), Josephine, Harry and Joseph (23) spoke Irish and English. Mary Dorothy Mary Patricia and Mary (42) could not read, Helen Jane and Thomas could read only and the rest could all read and write. Joseph R. was a fleet surgeon R. I. (retired), Josephine was a district councillor, Harry was a farmer, Joseph (23), Thomas and Margaret were domestic servants and Charles Edwd [sic], Josephina, Joseph (10), Mary Veronica and Helen Jane were scholars. The house they lived in was a 1st class dwelling with 14 rooms and they had a stable, a coach house, a cow house, a fowl house, a turf house and a shed. The landholder was Joseph R. McDonnell.

 

Duane

The widow, Barbara (40), who had been married for 20 years, was the head of this family. She shared the house with her 5 children, Mary (18), Bridget (15), John (12), Festy (19) and Michl (8). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and, apart from Michl, they could all read and write. Festy was a stoker at the Marconi’s Wireless Company and John was a scholar. The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 3 rooms. The landholder was Paul McCabe.

 

Murphy                                   (additional surnames: Boay [sic] and Chapman)

Charles Ouseley [sic] (37) was the head of this family and he was married to Marguerita [sic] Hoke ? ? (33) and had been for 6 years and they had 1 child, John Charles Ouseley [sic] Coley (5) and also in the house at that time were 2 servants, Annie Coley Boay [sic] (40) and Patrick Chapman (23). Annie Coley and Patrick were listed as members of the Church of Rome and the others were all members of the Church of Ireland. Charles Ouseley [sic] and Annie Coley were born in the City of Dublin, Marguerita [sic] was born in Co. Dublin, John Charles Ouseley Coley was born in Co. Mayo and Patrick was born in Co. Galway. Apart from John Charles Ouseley Coley, they could all read and write. Charles Ouseley was in the D.I.R.I. Constabulary, John Charles Ouseley Coley was a scholar, Annie Coley was a cook domestic servant and Patrick was a Chauffeur domestic servant. The house they lived in was a 1st class dwelling with 13 rooms and they had 2 stables, a coach house, a harness room, a cow house, a fowl house, a turf house and a shed. The landholder was Charles O. Murphy.

 

McCabe                                  (additional surnames: Cafferty, Ward and Conneely)

Paul (48) was the head of this household and he lived in the house with 2 brothers, Joseph Cafferty (74) and Bonaventure Cafferty (68) and 2 servants, John Ward (22) and Thomas Conneely (14). They were all Roman Catholic and Paul was born in Co. Fermanagh, Joseph and Bonaventure were born in Co. Mayo and John and Thomas were born in Co. Galway. Joseph, Bonaventure and Thomas spoke both Irish and English and Paul and John spoke only English but they could all read and write. Paul, Joseph and Bonaventure were farmers, John was a domestic servant and Thomas was a farm servant. The house they lived in was a 1st class dwelling with 12 rooms and they had 2 stables, a coach house, 2 cow houses, a piggery, a fowl house and a turf house. The landholder was Paul McCabe.

 

Wilson                                                (additional surname: Harley)

Jackson (74) was the head of this household and he had been married to Mary Jane (65) for 48 years and they had had 2 children, both of which had survived. They share the house with 2 of their grandchildren, Henry Wilson Harvey (21) and Richard George Harvey (16). They were all Church of Ireland and Jackson was born in St Anningsley, Yorkshire, Mary Jane and Richard George were born in Co. Galway and Henry Wilson was born in Co. Mayo. Mary Jane spoke Irish and English and all could read and write. Jackson was a coach builder retired and Henry Wilson was a coach builder master. The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 5 rooms and they had a stable, a workshop and a forge. The landholder was Jackson Wilson.

 

McCormack

John (40) was the head of this family and he had been married to Annie Teresa (26) for 9 years and they had had 5 children of which 3 had survived. Those 3 children also lived in the house and they were, William Gerrard (5), Madeline Christina (3) and Irene Gertrude (2). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic, with the exception of John, who was born in Co. Sligo. Iren Gertrude could not read, Madeline Christina could read only and the others could all read and write. John was a sergeant in the R.I.C. and William Gerrard and Madeline Christina were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 5 rooms and they had a turf house. The landholder was Bernard J. Lee.

 

Graham

The head of the family in house 17 was Thomas (30) and he had been married to Susanah (23) for 2 years and they had had 2 children, Florence (5) and Harold (1). They were all Church of Ireland and there was no place of birth for Thomas or Susanah but Florence was born in Liverpool and Harold was born in Co. Galway. Apart from Harold, they could all read and write. Thomas was an electrical engineer at the wireless station and Florence was a scholar. The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 5 rooms and they had a turf house. The landholder was Bernard J. Lee.

 

Leonard                                   (additional surname: McGowan)

John (35) was the head of this family and he had been married to Bridget (31) for 5 years, but they had no children. They shared the house with 2 boarders, James Leonard (31) and Joseph McGowan (30). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John and Joseph spoke only English and Bridget and James spoke both Irish and English and all could read and write. John was a coach builder, James was a wheel wright and Joseph was a coach painter. The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 5 rooms and they had a shed. The landholder was Bernard J. Lee.

 

Murray

The widow, Mary (58) was the head of this family and she had been married for 36 years and had 8 surviving children, although the census does not show how many she actually had. She shared the house with 3 of those children, Thomas (19), Nora (16) and Festus (13). Also in the house were 2 grandchildren, Martin (10) and Mary (8). They were all Roman Catholic and Martin and Mary (8) were born in America and the others were all born in Co. Galway. Mary (58) spoke Irish and English and the others all spoke only English. Apart from Mary (58), they could all read and write. Thomas was a farm labourer. The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 2 rooms. The landholder was J. J. Connolly.

 

Fulcher                                                (additional surname: Scantlebury [sic])

There were 2 occupants of house 20 and the head of the household was Clarence Alban (37) and he was single and shared the house with a servant, Alice Scantlebury [sic] (25). They were both Church of England and were born in England. They could both read and write. Clarence Alban was a lieutenant in the Royal Navy active list (? Offr of Coast Guard) and Alice was a housekeeper. The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 6 rooms and they had a turf house. The landholder was Pat Clancey.

 

Gibbons

Martin (51) was the head of the last house in Ardbear and he had been married to Mary S. (43) for 21 years and they had had 7 children and 6 had survived. They shared the house with 5 of those children, Kathleen E. (14), Aileen R. (9), John F. (7), Joseph P. (5) and Christopher (3mths). They were all Roman Catholic and Martin and Christopher were born in Co. Galway, Mary S. was born in Co. Westmeath and the others were all born in Co. Roscommon. Martin spoke both Irish and English and all, apart from baby Christopher, could read and write. Martin was a R.I.C. pensioner and Kathleen E., Aileen R., John F. and Joseph P. were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 3 rooms and they had a cow house. The landholder was Thomas Gibbons.

 

 

1901 Census for Ardbear

Overview of Ardbear in 1901

The 1901 census shows that there were a total of 31 houses in the townland and 24 of those houses were occupied. Houses 3-5, 8, 9, 21 and 31 were unoccupied. The landholder of house 3 was Fidelis M. Lynch, the landholder of houses 4 and 5 was Rep. J. J. Eyre, the land holder of houses 8 and 9 was Margaret A. Stanley, the landholder of house 21 was Patrick J. Needham and the landholder of house 31 was Bishop O’Sullivan. House 2 was a monastery, House 3 was a monastery school and all the others were listed as being private dwellings. All the occupied houses were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls with houses 1, 2, 12, 15-18, 20 and 23-25 had a slate, iron or tiled roof and all the others had only thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing. Houses 1, 2, 15 and 23 were 1st class dwellings, houses 12, 13, 16-18, 24 and 25 were 2nd class dwellings and all the others were 3rd class. House 27 had 1 room and 1 window, houses 10, 20 and 30 had 2 rooms and 1 window in the front, houses 6. 7, 11, 14, 17, 19, 22, 26, 28 and 29 all had between 2 and 4 rooms 2 windows in the front and house 13 had 3 rooms and 3 windows in the front. House 16 had 4 rooms and 4 windows, house 12 had 5 rooms and 3 windows in the front, house 18 had 5 rooms and 4 windows in the front, houses 24 and 25 had between 7 and 9 rooms and 2 windows in the front, house 15 had 9 rooms and 9 windows, house 23 had 13 rooms and 6 windows in the front, house 2 had 13 rooms and 8 windows in the front and house 1 had 14 rooms and 14 windows. There were a total of 59 out houses in the townland and they consisted of 9 stables, 6 coach houses, 3 harness rooms, 9 cow houses, a dairy, 6 piggeries, 6 fowl houses, 2 barns, 6 turf houses, 3 potato houses, 3 workshops, 3 sheds, a forge and a laundry. The enumerator for the area was Sergeant William Sullivan.

 

Pye [sic]

The head of the first family in Ardbear was Joseph Patrick (53) and he was married to Mary Clarke Pye [sic] (40) and they shared the house with their daughter, Agnes (18). They were all Catholic and Joseph Patrick and Agnes were born in Co. Galway and Mary Clarke was born in Co. Donegal. Joseph Patrick spoke both Irish and English and all of them could read and write. John Patrick was a Professor of Anatomy Q. C. and a Galway J.P., Agnes was a scholar. The house they lived in was a 1st class dwelling with 14 rooms and they had 2 stables, a coach house, cow house, a fowl house, a turf house, a workshop, a shed and a laundry.

 

Lynch              (additional surnames: Cafferkey [sic], Donnelly, Daly, Burke and Kerr)

The head of this household and Superior of Monastery was Fidelis M. (36) and also in the house were 5 monks, Bonaventure Cafferkey (55), Francis Donnelly (43), Anthony Daly (28), Jaochim [sic] Burke (20) and Sebastian Kerr. All were Roman Catholic and Fidelis M. was born in Co. Fermanagh, Bonaventure and Jaochim [sic] were born in Co. Mayo, Francis was born in Co. Westmeath and Anthony was born in Kings County[ii]. Bonaventure, Jaochim [sic] and Sebastian could all speak both Irish and English and all could read and write. Fidelis was a teacher of mathematics, Bonaventure was the outdoors superintendent of farm and C, Francis was a horticulturist, Anthony was the indoor superintendent, Jaochim [sic] was a teacher (music) and Sebastian was a teacher in infant department (school). The house they lived in was a 1st class dwelling with 13 rooms and they had a stable, a coach house, cow house, a dairy, a piggery, a turf house and a potato house. The landholder was Fidelis M. Lynch.

 

House 3: unoccupied

 

House 4: unoccupied

 

House 5: unoccupied

 

Faherty                                    (additional surname: Geary)

John (30) was the head of this family and he was married to Bridget (30) and the 2 of them shared the house with 3 of their children, John J. (6), Margaret (4) and Mary (1) and also Bridget’s father, Thomas Geary (70). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Apart from the children, all of the family could speak both Irish and English. The children could not read, Thomas could read only and John and Bridget could read and write. John and Thomas were general labourers. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms and they had a cow house and a piggery. The landholder was Bernard J. Lee.

 

Faherty                                    (additional surnames: Coyne and Mullen)

The head of the household in house 7 was John (71) and he was married to Honoria (65) and the lived in the house with their widowed daughter, Bridget Coyne (40) and 2 grandchildren, Stephen Coyne (17) and Honor Mullen (3). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English, with the exception of young Honor, who only spoke English. Only Stephen could read and write. John was a farmer, Honoria was a farmer’s wife, Bridget was a farmer’s daughter and Stephen was a general labourer. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms and they had a cow house and a piggery. The landholder was Bernard J. Lee.

 

House 8: Unoccupied

 

House 9: Unoccupied

 

Faherty

Thomas (45), who was single, was listed as the head of this household and he lived in the house with his brother, James (37). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They could speak both Irish and English and they could both read and write. Bothe were listed as being Agricultural labourers. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms. The landholder was Thomas Flaherty.

 

Nee

There were 4 members of this family and the head of that family was the widow, Barbara (60) and she lived with her3 children, Thomas (34), John (30) and Bridget (22). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and Thomas and Bridget could read and write. Barbara was a farmer, Thomas was a plasterer, John was a farmer’s son and Bridget was a farmer’s daughter. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms and they had a cow house. The landholder was Barbara Nee.

 

Harley

The head of this family was Susannah (36), who was married but there was no mention of her husband in this entry. She shared the house with 6 of her children, Mary Kate (14), Susanna Jane (13), Henry Wilson (11), John Jackson (9), William Albert (3) and Dorcas Amelia (7mths). They were all Church of Ireland and Susannah was born in Yorkshire, England, John Jackson was born in Co. Galway and the others were all born in Co. Mayo. Apart from William Albert and Dorcas Amelia, they could all read and write. Mary Kate, Susanna Jane, Henry Wilson and John Jackson were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 5 rooms and they had a stable and a cow house. The landholder was Elizabeth Connolly.

 

Nee

Patrick (30) was the head of this family and he lived with his wife, Bridget (20) and his widowed father, Patrick (70). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and all could read and write. Patrick (30) was a marble polisher and Patrick (70) was a shoemaker (retired). The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 3 rooms. The landholder was Patrick Nee.

 

Cloherty                                  (additional surname: Quinn)

The head of the Cloherty family in house 14 was Thomas (26) and he was married to Sarah (21) and also in the house at that time were 3 of their children, Mary Kate (4), John Peter (2) and Margret Anne (1). There was also a boarder living there, Thomas Quinn (20). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic, except for Thomas Quinn, who was born in Dublin City. Sarah spoke both Irish and English and the others, apart from baby Margret Anne, spoke only English. Thomas (26) and Thomas (20) could read and write. Thomas (26) was a tailor and Thomas (20) was a coach painter. The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 3 rooms with a piggery. The landholder was Mary A. Harley.

 

Ring                                        (additional surnames: Lydon and King)

John J. (32) was listed as being the head of this family and he was married to Helna [sic] (25) and the lived in the house with their son, Alfred J.J. (4), their daughter, Mary J. King [sic] (1) and a servant, Anne Lydon (15). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John J. could speak only Irish and Anne could speak Irish and English. John J., Helna [sic] and Anne could read and write. John J. was a clerk of petty sessions, Anne was a general servant domestic and Alfred J.J. was a scholar. The house they lived in was a 1st class dwelling with 9 rooms with a stable, a coach house and a harness room. The landholder was Rep. J. J. Eyre.

 

Wilson                                    (additional surnames: Harley and Duane)

Jackson (64) was the head of the household in house 16 and he was married to Mary Jane (55) and they lived in the house with their grandson, Richard George Harley and 2 nieces, Elizabeth Duane (19) and Emily Duane (16). They were all Church of Ireland and Jackson was born in Yorkshire, England, Emily was born in Dublin City and the others were all born in Co. Galway. Mary Jane spoke Irish and English and all, apart from Richard George could read and write. Jackson was a master coach builder and Richard George was a scholar. The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 4 rooms with a piggery, a fowl house, a workshop, a shed and a forge. The landholder was Jackson Wilson.

 

Boylan

Of the 5 members of this Boylan family, Philip (45) was the head and he lived with his wife, Bridget (32) and 3 of their children, Michael (13), James (9) and Mary Frances (6). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Philip and Bridget spoke Irish and English and the children spoke only English. None of the family could read. Philip and Bridg.et were fruit dealers and the children were all scholars. The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 2 rooms. The landholder was Campbell Rutledge.

 

Casey

Patk (48) was the head of this family and he was married to Susan (47) and they shared the house with 6 of their children, Patk (24), Jas (16), Edward (18), Thomas (14), Margret (13) and Susan (9). They were all Roman Catholic and Patk (48) was born in Co. Roscommon, Susan (47) was born in Co. Clare and the children were all born in County Galway. Apart from Edward, Margret and Susan (9), all of the family could speak both Irish and English but they could all read and write. Patk (48) was a retired sergeant in the R.I.C., Patk (24) was a national school teacher and the other children were all scholars. The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 5 rooms. The landholder was Campbell Rutledge.

 

Geary                          (additional surnames: Keady and Devine)

Bridget (65) was the head of this household and she shared the house with 2 lodgers, Sarah Keady (65) and Honor Devine (86). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Bridget only spoke only Irish and Sarah and Honor spoke both Irish and English. None of the household could read. There were no occupations listed. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with 1 room. The landholder was Patrick J. Needham.

 

Needham

The sole occupant of house 20 was Patk J. (72), who was a widower. He was a Roman Catholic and was born in Clifden, Co. Galway. He could read and write, speak both Irish and English and was listed as being a civil engineer. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms and he had a stable. The landholder was Patrick J. Needham.

 

House 21: Unoccupied

 

Coyne

The head of this family was Martin (34) and he was married to Ellen (30) and they shared the house with 6 of their children, Mary Anne (11), Patrick (9), Bridget (7), John (5), Kate (3) and Martin H. (2mths). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin and Ellen spoke Irish and English. Martin, Kate and Martin H. could not read, John could read only and all the others could read and write. Martin was a farm steward and Mary Anne, Patrick, Bridget and John were scholars. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms and they had a cow house and a turf house. The landholder was Bishop O’Sullivan.

 

Lynan [sic]                              (additional surname: O’Flatney[sic][iii])

There were 2 people in this house, Elizabeth (30) and Helen (20) Helen O’Flatney [sic] (20). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Elizabeth spoke only English while Helen spoke both Irish and English and both could read and write. Elizabeth’s occupation was described as being a lady who takes in pagy [sic][iv] guests and Helen was a lady in waiting. The house they lived in was a 1st class dwelling with 13 rooms and they had a stable, a coach house, a harness room, a cow house, a fowl house, a barn and a turf house. The landholder was Joseph Gorham.

 

Wilson                                    (additional surnames: (? un-legible) and Cooke)

James H. (37) was listed as the head of this household and he was married to Annie (37), Also in the house at that time was their son, Joseph (3mths) and 2 servants, Rose (surname is un-legible) (47) and Anne Cooke (21). They were all Roman Catholic and James H. was born in Dublin City, Annie and Rose were born in England and Joseph and Anne were born in Co. Galway. Only Anne Cooke could speak Irish and English. Apart from baby Joseph, they could all read and write. James H. was a landlord J.P., Rose was a nurse domestic servant and Anne was a cook domestic servant. The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 7 rooms and they had a stable, a coach house, a fowl house, a turf house and a workshop. The landholder was James H. Wilson.

 

Goodman                                (additional surnames: Smith, Murphy and Quin)

There were 7 members of this household in house 25 and the head of the house was Walter J. (65) and he was married to Lillie A. (39). Also in the house were 2 of their children, Evelyne [sic] A. (3) and Walter R. (2) and 3 servants, Elizabeth Smith (16), Bridget Murphy (25) and Ellen Quin (21). Bridget and Ellen were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Meath, the others were all members of the Irish Church and all the Goodman’s were born in Dublin City and Elizabeth was born in Co. Meath. There was nothing entered under the language heading but all, apart from Evelyne [sic]A. and Walter R., they could all read and write. Walter J. was a land comr. [sic], Elizabeth was a parlor maid domestic servant, Bridget was a cook domestic servant and Ellen was a nurse domestic servant. The house they lived in was a 2nd class dwelling with 9 rooms and they had a stable, a coach house, a harness room, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house, a barn, a turf house and a potato house. The landholder was Walter Goodman.

 

King

John (70) was the head of this family and he lived with his wife, Ellen (60) and their daughter Julia (15). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English but only Ellen and Julia could read and write. John was a farmer, Ellen was a farmer’s wife and Julia was a farmer’s daughter. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms. The landholder was John King.

 

Walsh                                      (additional surname:  Cribbins)

The widow, Mary (80) was listed as the head of this family and she lived with her widowed sister-in-law, Mary Cribbins (70). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They could speak both Irish and English but neither of them could read. Mary (80) was a farmer and Mary (70) was a farm servant. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with 1 room. The landholder was Mary Walsh.

 

Devenish (?)

Dunlop (67) was the only occupant of house (28) and he was a Protestant Church of Ireland and was born in Co. Galway town. He could read and write and was a farmer. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with 3 rooms and he had a fowl house and a potato house. The landholder was Dunlop Devenish.

 

Conroy

Of the nine members of this family, Michael (70) was the head and he was married to Julia (35) and they shared the house with 7 of their children, Mary (13), Julia (11), Michael (9), Martin (7), Bridget (5), Ellen (3) and Patrick J. (14 days). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael (70), Julia (35), Mary, Julia (11) and Michael (9) spoke Irish and English. Martin could read only and Mary, Julia (11) and Michael (9) could read and write. Michael (70) was a herd and Mary, Julia (11), Michael (9) and Martin were scholars. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms. The landholder was Michael Conroy.

 

Gannon

The head of the last family in Ardbear was Festus (55) and he was married to Margaret (70). They were both Roman Catholic and Festus was born in Kylemore, Co. Galway and Margaret was born in Ardagh, Co. Galway. They could speak both Irish but English and neither could read. Festus was a farmer and Margaret was a farmer’s wife. The house they lived in was a 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms. The landholder was Festus Gannon.

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Ardbear

The main immediate lessor in the townland of Ardbear was Thomas Ayres and all the tenements were leased from him unless otherwise stated.

 

James Needham and Michael Lyden jointly leased 5 acres, 3 roods and 3 perches of land for £2 each, John Lydon (Smyth) leased a garden of 27 perches for 3s and Michael Lydon leased a herd’s house on 7 acres, 3 roods and 33 perches of land for which he paid £4 for the land and 5s for the herd’s house. Catherine O’Dowd leased 3 plots of land, the first, of 3 acres, 2 roods and 37 perches for £1 17s, the second of 2 acres, 3 roods and 30 perches for £2 5s and the third of 6 acres, 1 rood and 35 perches of land, Michael Joyce (short) leased 7 acres, 1 rood and 30 perches of land for £4 10s and Abraham J. Creighton leased 16 acres, 2 roods and 21 perches of land for £5 15s. There was a vacant house and offices belonging to Abraham J. Creighton that had an annual ratable valuation of £8 and Edward Meally [sic] leased a house and a garden of 16 perches for 2s for the garden and 10s for the house. William Pearce leased a house and offices on 1 acre, 2 roods and 30 perches of land from Anthony Mullin for £1 10s for the land and £4 5s for the buildings, also he leased a garden of 1 rood from Bridget McDonough for 5s and 1 acre and 30 roods, again from Bridget McDonough, for £1. Thomas Lynch and Patrick Connor each leased a house from William Pierce for 7s each. John McDermott leased a house from William Harlan for 15s, Denis Mullins leased a house from William Harlan for 12s and Catherine McDonald leased a house on 1 acre of land for 5s for the land and 7s for the house.

 

William Lydon leased 2 plots from Thomas Ayres, the first being 1 acre, 3 roods of land for £1 10s and a house and small garden for 7s. Patrick Lynch paid 15s for 3 roods of land and 10s for a house. Jeramiah Faherty paid £1 5s for 1 acre, 3 roods and 20 perches of land and 5s for a house, Peter Faherty paid £1 8s for 2 acres and 8 perches of land and also £3 5s for 9 acres, 1 rood and 21 acres of land and 5s for a house. Peter Faherty then leased the house to Michael Carney for 7s, he leased a house to John Mulkerrin for 5s, he leased 2 roods of land to Patrick Nee for 6s and a house on 4 acres, 2 roods and 8 perches of land to Peter and Michael Nee for £2 15s for the land and 12s for the house. John Kelly leased a house from Denis Logan for 5s, John Mullins had a house with an annual ratable value of 5s, Barnaby Hurles [sic] leased a house from Mary Nee for 5s and there was a vacant house belonging to Mary Nee that had an annual ratable value of 5s.

 

Mary Nee paid 8s for a 1 rood and 32 perches of a garden and 7s for a house, Mary Faherty and Michael Walsh jointly leased houses on 3 acres, 3 roods and 18 perches of land for £1 10s for the land and 5s for the houses each. Martin Faherty leased a house on 4 acres and 20 perches of land for £2 for the land and 7s for the house, Francis McDonald leased tenements, the first was a house and offices on 6 acres and 1 rood for £2 10s for the land and 7s for the buildings and secondly, 7 acres, 1 rood and 9 perches of land for £3 10s. William Cunnis [sic] paid £1 10s for 3 acres, 2 roods and 10 perches of land, Patrick Mullin (Roe) paid 18s for 2 acres, 1 rood and 10 perches of land, Andrew Corneely [sic] paid £2 5s for 5acres and 2 roods of land and Mary Corneely [sic] leased 2 plots, the first was 3 roods and 20 perches of land for 15s and the second was 7 acres, 2 roods and 32 perches of land for £2 8s. Richard Foreman leased a house and offices on 4 acres, 2 roods and 10 perches of land from Thomas Harlan for £2 10s for the land and £4 for the buildings, Denis Logan leased a house and offices on 6 acres, 1 rood and 6 perches of land for £1 10s for the land and 5s for the buildings, John McGuinness leased a herd’s house and offices on 8 acres, 2 roods and 21 perches of land for £2 10s for the land and 5s for the buildings and Michael O’Brien leased 5 acres, 2 roods and 4 perches of land from Thomas Ayres for £2 5s and also a herd’s house and office on 1 acre, 1 rood and 30 perches of land from Francis Costello for £1 for the land and 7s for the houses.

 

Francis Costello leased 5 tenements from Thomas Ayres, 1rood of land for 3s, 28 acres 1 rood and 35 perches of land for £11 10s, a monastery and offices on 11 acres, 3 roods and 33 perches of land for £7 15s for the land and £12 for the buildings, a herd’s house on 11 acres and 10 perches of land for £3 for the land and 7s for the herd’s house and a house on 2 acres and 20 perches of land for 7s for the land and 3s for the house. The parochial school leased a house from Francis Costello for £2 10s.

 

Francis Mullin leased 10 acres, 2 roods and 27 perches of land from Thomas Ayres for £2 5s, Patrick Mullin (Peter) leased 6 acres, 1 rood and 10 perches of land from Thomas Ayres for £1 7s and 3 acres and 1 rood of land from Bridget McDonough for 18s. Anthony Mullins leased 12 acres, 3 roods and 28 perches of land for £4 10s, Patrick Healy and Anthony Gorham Jointly leased 15 acres, 1 rood and 27 perches of land for which each paid £3 and Patrick Healy also paid 15s for a house. John Darcy paid £9 for 35 acres, 2 roods and 30 perches of land and 5s for a herd’s house and Samuel Jones, John Scully, Francis Costello and Dunlop Devenish jointly leased 15 acres of mountain land for 4s each. Dunlop Devenish leased a house and offices on 1 acre, 3 roods and 2 perches of land for 15s for the land and 10s for the buildings and also 2 acres, 1 rood and 30 perches of land for 7s. Samuel Jones leased a herd’s house on 5 acres and 33 perches of land for £1 for the land and 5s for the herd’s house and also a house, offices and a gate-lodge on 49 acres, 2 roods and 14 perches of land for £28 10s for the land and £26 10s for the buildings. John Geraghty leased a house and offices from Samuel jones for £4 16s, a graveyard of 2 roods was leased from Thomas Ayres for 3s, George H. Clarke paid £4 10s for 11 acres and 6 perches of land and £5 5s for a house and offices on that land and John Scully leased a house and offices on 19 acres, 2 roods and 11 perches of land for £12 10s for the land and £7 10s for the buildings.

 

There were also 2 acres and 32 perches of water in the townland. There were exemptions for the parochial school house of £2 10s and 3s for the graveyard. There was 1 small Island belonging to Richard Foreman of 1 rood and 16 perches that had no agricultural value and also another island of 16 perches that also had no agricultural value.

 

1670 Down Survey for  Ardbear

The 1670 Down Survey name for this area was Arbera. The 1641 (pre Cromwell) owners were the Catholics, Murragh O’Flaharty [sic]and Edmund O’Flaharty [sic] and in 1670 the owners were James Darcy and Edward Geoghegan, again, both Catholics. There 60 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 258 plantation acres of profitable land and that 258 plantation acres were forfeited.

[i] Co. Laois

[ii] Co. Offaly

[iii] Possibly Flatley or Flaherty?

[iv] Possibly could mean “lady who takes in paying guests”

This page was added on 11/06/2018.

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