Cashel

An Caiseal

Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

St Jame's Church
Roger Harrison
Cashel House Hotel
Roger Harrison
Signpost
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Old Baptismal Font
Roger Harrison

Townland:                                Cashel

Civil Parish:                              Moyrus

Barony:                                     Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                         Roundstone

District Electoral Division:    Moyrus

Area:                                         1256.57 acres / 1256 acres, 2 roods, 11 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Roundstone R.C. Parish 1872-1881

Map

Galway Library for Cashel

Logainm for Cashel

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Cashel

 

1911 Census for Cashel

Overview of Cashel in 1911

The census of 1911 shows the there were 14 houses in Cashel and 12 of those were occupied. House 12 was the Cashel National School and house 13 was unoccupied. House 8 was a hotel, house 11 was the post office and house 14 was the R.I.C. Barracks. All the buildings were constructed of stone, brick or concrete and houses 1 had 14 had slate, iron or tiled roofs and the others had only thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. Houses 1, 8 and 14 were 1st class dwellings, houses 2, 3,5 10 and 11 were 2nd class dwellings and house 4, 6, 7 and 9 were 3rd class dwellings. Houses 6 and 7 had 2 rooms and 1 window, houses 4 and 9 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, 2, 3, 5 and 10 had 2 rooms and 3 windows in the front, house 11 had 3 rooms and 3 windows, house 14 had 6 rooms and 12 windows, house 1 had 6 rooms and 18 windows and house 8 had 6 rooms and 36 windows. The out-offices and farm-steadings return (form B2) shows that there were a total 38 out buildings in Cashel consisting of 8 stables, 4 coach houses, 2 harness rooms, 10 cow houses, 5 piggeries, 2 fowl houses, 5 turf houses, a potato house and a workshop. The enumerator’s abstract return (form N) shows that there were 52 people in the townland at that time, 26 male and 26 female. The enumerator for the area was Const. John Kelly.

 

Hazell                          (additional surnames: Carpenter, McGowan and O’Connor)

The Hazell family lived in the first house in Cashel and the head of this family was Thomas (53) and he had been married to to his wife Cecil (sic) (44) for 20 years and in that time they had had 6 children and all of those had survived. Four of those children lived with them at that time and they were Frances (20), April (15), Arthur (10) and Phyllis (8). Also in the house at that time were 4 servants, James Carpenter (49), who was married and had been for 29 years and in that time he had had 5 children of which 4 had survived. Elizabeth McGowan (29), Annie McGowan (24) and Katherine O’Connor (17). Thomas, Francis, April, Arthur and Phyllis were Church of Ireland and born in Co. Galway, Cecil (sic) was Church of England and was born in Somerset and teh servants were all Roman Catholic and James was born in Co. Meath, Elizabeth and Annie were born in Co. Leitrim and Katherine was born in Co. Galway. Only Katherine spoke both Irish and English and there was nothing entered for the other members of the household so that could indicate that they only spoke English. All of them could read and write. Thomas was a land agent, April, Arthur and Phyllis were scholars, James Carpenter was a couffeur, Elizabeth McGowan was a parlour maid, Annie McGowan was a house maid and Katherine O’Connor was a cook, domestic servant. The house they all lived in was a 6 roomed, 2st class dwelling with 2 stables, 3 coach houses, a harness room, a fowl house, a turf house, a potato house and a workshop. Thomas Hazell was the landholder.

 

Geary

The head of this family was the widower Patrick (76) and he had been married for 43 years and in that time he had had 7 children and all of those had survived. He shared the house with 3 of his daughters, Margaret (35), Bridget (28) and Annie (26) and also a servant, Collman (sic) Geary. All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway and all spoke both Irish and English. They could all read and write. Patrick was a farmer, Margaret and Bridget were assistant sub post mistresses and Collman (sic) was a labourer. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, cow house and piggery. Patrick Geary was the landholder.

 

Canavan                                  (additional surname; Connor)

The head of this family was the widow Mary (66) and she shared the house with 2 of her children Winifred (24) and Richard (19) and also servant Patrick Connor (14). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They all could speak both Irish and English and all could read and write. Winifred was a relieving officer, Richard was a farmer and Patrick was a farm servant domestic. They all shared a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, 2 cow houses and a piggery. The landholder was Mary Canavan.

 

Canavan

The head of this family in house 4 was John (60) and he had been married to Eliza (52) for 23 years but there was no record of them having children. They were both Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. They both spoke Irish and English but only John could read and write. John was listed as being a farmer. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a stable, a cow house and a piggery. John Canavan was the landholder.

 

Canavan

The sole occupant of house 5 was The widower Anthony (65). He was a Roman Catholic and spoke Irish and English but could not read. He was listed as being a farmer and the house he lived in was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and he was the landholder.

 

King

There were 11 members of the King family in house 6 and Joseph (54) was the head of the family and he had been married to Mary (46) for 27 years and in that time they had had 14 children of which 13 had survived. Nine of those children lived with them and they were John (19), Joseph (17), Thomas (16), Val (14), Barbara (10), Owen (8), Lizzie (6) Michael (4) and Maggie (8mths). All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Joseph (54), Mary, John, Joseph (17), Thomas, Val and Barbara spoke both Irish and English and could read and write while there was nothing entered for the others under the Irish Language heading so that could indicate that they only spoke English. Joseph (54) was a farmer, John was a postman, Joseph (17) was a farmer’s son and Val, Barbara, Owen and Lizzie were scholars. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class house with a stable, 2 cow houses and a piggery. Joseph King was the landholder.

 

Sullivan

The head of this family was Matthias (75) and he shared the house with his Bartley (47), both widowers. They both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke Irish and English but neither of them could read. Matthias was a farmer and Bartley was a farmer’s son. They shred a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and they had a cow house. Matthias Sullivan was the landholder.

 

O’loghlan                                (additional surnames: Leonard, Coyne, Kenny, Walsh, Jordan                                                                                      and Westwell)

The head of this family was John Joseph (61) who had been married to Delia (45) for 30 years and in that time they had had 11 children but only 6 of those had survived. They shared the house with 4 of those children, May (27), William Joseph (25), Maude (21) and Gertrude (12). Also in the house at that time were 6 servants, Margaret Leonard (19), Kate Coyne (17), John Kenny (20), Bartley Walsh (18), Johanna Jordan (16) and Albert Westwell (22). Albert Westwell was a member of the Church of England and all the others were Roman Catholic. Delia was born in Co. Mayo, Margaret was born in Co. Meath, Johanna was born in Co. Wexford, Albert was born in England and the others were all born in Co. Galway. All of the household could read and write. John Joseph, Delia, May and Bartley could speak both Irish and English, William Joseph spoke English but there was nothing entered for the others under that heading. John Joseph was a hotel proprietor, William Joseph was listed as petty sessions, Margaret was a shop assistant, Kate was a domestic servant, John was a coachman domestic servant, Bartley was a general servant, Johanna was a cook domestic servant and Albert was listed as an engineer fitter at work. The house they all occupied was a 6 roomed, 1st class dwelling and they had 2 stables, a coach house, a harness room, 2 cow houses, a piggery, a fowl house and a turf house. The landholder was listed as being John O’Loghlin.

 

Creane

Thomas (52) was the head of this family and he lived with his wife, Mary (34) and they had been married for 1 year but there were no children listed at that time. Thomas was born in Co. Clare and Mary was born in Co. Galway and both were Roman Catholic. They spoke both Irish and English and both of them could read and write. Thomas was listed as being a slater. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and they had a cow house and a turf house. Thomas Creane was the landholder.

 

Diskin                         (additional surname: Cullinan)

William (36) was the head of this family and he shared the house with a servant, Maggie Cullinan (46). They were both Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. William spoke both Irish and English and both could read and write. William was a Roman Catholic clergyman and Maggie was a cook domestic servant. The house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and the landholder was Thomas Hazell.

 

Geary

The sole occupant of this house was John (40). He was a Roman Catholic and was born in Galway. He could read and write and spoke Irish and English. He was listed as being a farmer. The house in which he lived was a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and the landholder was Patrick Geary.

 

Flattery

The head of this family in house 14.1 was Daniel (49)[i] and he shared the house with his wife, Ellen (38) and they had been married for 18 years and in that time they had had 6 children and 4 of those had survived. Three of those children lived with them at that time and they were Joseph (14), Charles (9) and Aileen (4). Daniel, Charles and Aileen were born in Co. Galway and Ellen and Joseph were born in Co. Mayo. Ellen spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others. Aileen could not read but the others could all read and write. Joseph and Charles were scholars. The house they lived in was a 4 roomed, 1st class dwelling and it had 2 turf houses. The landholder was Richard Berridge of Ballynahinch.

 

R.I.C. Barracks                                   (additional surnames: Kelly,Gilmore and Flattery)

Members of the R.I.C. Only went by initials in the census’ but some of the names could be got from sources like the names of the enumerators etc.. D.F. (Daniel Flattery) (49) was a sergeant and was born in Co. Galway and could read and write. He was married (see Flattery above) and before joining the R.I.C. He was a farmer labourer. J.D. (27) was born in Co. Mayo and was a Roman Catholic. He could read and write. He was single and before joining the R.I.C. He was a farmer’s son. M.G (Martin Gilmore) (25) was a Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. He could read and write. He was single and before joining the R.I.C. He was a farmer’s son. J.K. (John Kelly) (21) was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Kerry. He could read and write. He was single and before joining the R.I.C. He was a shop assistant. The building was a 4 roomed, 1st class dwelling and they had 2 turf houses. Richard Berridge of Ballynahinch was the landholder.

 

 

 

1901 Census for Cashel

Overview of Cashel in 1901

The 1901 census shows that there were a total of 14 buildings in the townland of Cashel. 12 were occupied at that time. House 6 was a lodging house, House 9 was a hotel, House 10 was a public house, House 12 was the R.I.C. Barracks, house 13 was a shop and post office and house 14 was Cashel National School. All the houses were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and houses 7-9 and 12 had slate, iron or tiled roofs while the others all had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. Houses 7, 9 and 12 were 1st class dwellings, houses 8, 10 and 11 were 2nd class dwellings and the others wee all 3rd class. House 3 had 2 rooms and 1 window, houses 1, 2, 4-6 and 8 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, house 11 had 2 rooms and 3 windows, house 10 had 4 rooms and 5 windows, house 12 had 5 rooms and 6 windows and house 7 had 6 rooms and 15 windows. He enumerator’s abstract return (form N) shows that there were a total of 66 people in the townland at that time, consisting of 38 male and 28 female. The enumerator for the area was Const. Michael Begley.

 

Canavan

The head of the first family in Cashel was Michl (sic) (54) and he was married to Mary (50) and they shared the house with 5 of their children and they were John (23), Mary (16), Winifred (14), Monica (12) and Richard (9). They were all Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. They all spoke both Irish and English and all could read and write. Michl (sic) and Mary (50) were listed as being farmers, John was a farmer’s son, Mary (16) was a farmer’s daughter and Winifred, Monica and Richard were scholars. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Michael Canavan was the landholder.

 

McCormack                            (additional surname: Green)

The head of this family was Martin (35), who was married but no record of his wife was given here, and he shared the house with a servant, Joseph Green (25). Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Both of them were boatmen. The house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and John McCormack was the landholder.

 

Canavan                                  (additional surnames: McDonagh and McDonnell)

The head of this family was John (44) and he lived with his wife Eliza (35), a relative, Peter McDonagh (12) and a boarder, Mary McDonnall (65). Peter was born in Boston and the others were born in Co. Galway and all were Roman Catholic. Mary spoke only English and could not read while the others could all read and write and spoke both Irish ans English. John, Eliza and Peter were listed as being farmers while Mary was recorded as being a servant. The house they all lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and John Canavan was the landholder.

 

Molloy

The head of this family in house 3 was Martin (72) and he was married to Mary (70). They wee both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke Irish an English and but could not read. Martin was a farmer. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Martin Molloy was the landholder.

 

King

Joseph (40) was the head of this King family and he was married to Mary (30). They shared their house with 8 of their children, Martin (17), Patrick (15), Stephen (13), Mary (11), Joseph (9), Thomas (7), Valentine (5) and Barbara (1). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. With the exception of baby Barbara, all spoke Irish and English and all, except Valentine and Barbara could read and write. Joseph (40) was a farmer, Martin was a labourer, Patrick was a post boy and Stephen, Mary(11), Joseph (9) and Thomas were scholars. They all loved in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Joseph King was the landholder.

 

Canavan

The head of this Canavan family was Thomas (50) and he shared the house with his brother, Anthony (45). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke both Irish and English but neither could read. Thomas was listed as being a farmer and Anthony was a farmer’s son. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class house and Thomas Canavan was the landholder.

 

Molloy                        (additional surnames: Crean, McCracken, Morris and Faherty)

Barbara (40) was the head of this family and she shared the house with her brother Michael (33), 3 boarders, Thomas Crean (35), Arthur McCracken (33) and Thomas Morris (25) and a visitor was also in the house at that time and he was Michael Faherty (9). Arthur was a Presbyterian and born in Co Antrim and the others were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All could read and write, with Barbara, Michael, Thomas Crean and Michael Faherty spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the other 2 which could indicate that they only spoke English. Barbara’s occupation was listed as farmer and lodging housekeeper, Michael was an agricultural labourer, Thomas Crean was a plasterer, Arthur McCracken and Thomas Morris were painters and Michael Faherty was a scholar. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Barbara Molloy was the landholder.

 

Hazell                         (additional surnames: Merrick, Galland, Oliver, Henry, and Cooke)

The head of this house was Thomas (44) and he was married to Cecil (sic) (34) and they shared the house with 5 of their children, Francis (10), Falcon (sic) (8), Cecil (6), April (4) and Arthur (7mths). Also in the house were a governess, Edith Merrick (40) and 4 servants, Lydia Galland (20), Rose Oliver (15), Mary Henry (21) and Bridget Cooke (22). Thomas, Francis, Falcon, Cecil (6), April and Arthur were Church of Ireland and born in Co. Galway, Cecil (sic)(34) and Lydia were born in England and were Church of England, Edith was Church of Ireland and born in Limerick, Rose was Church of Ireland and born in Scotland, Mary was Roman Catholic and born in Co. Clare and Bridget was born in Co. Galway and was Roman Catholic. Apart from baby Arthur they could all read and write and Bridget could speak both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others under that heading so that could suggest that they only spoke English. Thomas was a agent land and magistrate, Francis, Falcon, Cecil and April were scholars, Arthur was listed as an infant, Edith was a governess, Lydia was a parlour maid domestic servant, Rose was a housemaid domestic servant, Mary was a nurse domestic servant and Bridget was a cook domestic servant. The house they all lived in was a 6 roomed, 1st class dwelling and Thomas Hazell was the landholder.

Healy

The head of the Healy family in house 8 was the widower Jeremiah(66) and he shared the house with his daughter Hannah (22). Both were Roman Catholic and Jeremiah was born in Co. Kerry and Hannah was born in Co. Tipperary. Both could read and write but there was nothing entered under the Irish Language heading, so that could indicate that they only spoke English. Jeremiah was an ex H. constable in the R.I.C. and Hannah’s occupation was listed as housekeeping for parent. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and the landholder was Thomas Hazell.

 

O Loghlen                               (additional surnames: McDermot, O Nealley, Kiely, King,                                                                                            Cosgrave, Howard, Kilkelly and Faherty)

The head of the family in house 9 was William Joseph (52) and he was married to Delia Agnes (40). They shared the house with 3 of their daughters, Mary (19), Ruth (6) and Gertrude (3). Also in the house at that time were, a visitor, E.J. McDermot (53), a shop assistant, Patrick O Nealley (20), 5 servants, Bridget Kiely (21), Pat King (25), Martin Cosgrave (21), Michl (sic) Kilkelly (25) and Coleman Faherty (18) and also a baker, Pat Howard (27). They were all Roman Catholic, William Joseph and Mary were born in Cashel Co. Galway, There was no birth place listed for Gertrude, Bridget and Pat were born in Co. Clare and the others were all born in Co. Galway. Patrick spoke only English and the others, with the exception of Ruth and Gertrude, spoke both Irish and English. They were all listed as being able to read and write. William Joseph was a justice of the peace and a (?) farmer, Mary was a merchants daughter, Ruth was a scholar, EJ McDermot was a magistrate, Patrick was a shop man grocery, Bridget was a parlour maid domestic servant, Pat and Martin were a car drivers domestic servants, Pat was a baker domestic servant, Michl (sic) was a stable man domestic servant and Coleman was a boots domestic servant. The house they were all in was a 6 roomed, 1st class dwelling and the landholder was John J O Loghlen.

 

Sweeney

The sole occupant of house 10 was Edward (25) and he was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway. He spoke Irish and English and could read and write. His occupation was a grocery shop assistant. The house he lived in was a 4 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and the landholder was John J O Loghlen.

 

Geary                          (additional surname: Cooke)

The head of the house in house 11 was the widower Patrick (63) and he shared the house with 5 of his children, John (30), Edward (28), Margaret (25), Brigid (20) and Annie (17) and also a servant, Pat Cooke (18). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They could all read and write and spoke Irish and English. Patrick was a farmer, John and Edward were farmer’s sons, Margaret, Brigid and Annie were telegraphists and Pat was a farmer servant, The house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and Patrick Geary was the landholder.

 

Carney

The head of this family was Patrick (47)[ii] and he lived with his wife, Ellen Patrick (30) and their children Mary (7), Lily (6), John Francis (3) and James Odonnell (10mths). They were all Roman Catholic and Patrick was from Co. Leitrim, Ellen Patrick was born in Kings County[iii], Mary was born in Co. Roscommon and the others were born in Co. Galway. John Francis and James ODonnell could not read but the others could read and write. There was nothing entered under the Irish Language heading, so that could indicate that they only spoke English. Patrick was a sergeant in the R.I.C. And Mary and Lily were scholars. The house they lived in was a 5 roomed, 1st class dwelling and the landholder was Richard Berridge.

 

R.I.C. Barracks                                   (additional surnames: Carney, Begley and Tuohy)

The census only shows the initials of serving R.I.C. Members but some names can be got from other sources such as the enumerators. P.C. (Patrick Carney) (47), who was a sergeant, was a Roman Catholic and born in Co. Leitrim. He could read and write and before joining the R.I.C. He was a Farmer’s son. T.T. Thomas Tuohy (27) who was a constable, was born in Co. Clare and was a Roman Catholic. He could read and write and before joining the R.I.C. he was a farmer’s son. M. B. (Michael Begley) (26), who was a constable, was a Roman Catholic and born in Co. Mayo. He could read and write and before joining the R.I.C. he was a farmer’s son. J.B. (25), who was a constable, was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Tipperary. He could read and write and before joining the R.I.C. he was a farmer’s son. J. OB. (20), who was a constable and he was born in Co. Mayo and a Roman Catholic. He could read and write and before joining the R.I.C. he was a farmer’s son. The building was a 5 roomed, 1st class dwelling and the landholder was Richard Berridge.

 

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Cashel

Ann Conneely – Aplication No. C/17 96. Application was received on 02 January 1917 with an address at that time of Mrs Anne Conneely, Inishlacken, Roundstone Co. Galway. Ann’s parents were given as Michl. And Bridget Conneely nee Ridge. The address in 1851 was Cashel, in the Parish of Moyrus, in the Barony of Ballynahinch, Co. Galway. The search was returned on 06 January 1917.

 

Brigid Flynn – Application No. C/20 4289. Application received on 20 March 1920 with the address of Mrs. Brigid Fury, Railway Cottage, Gurrane, Oranmore. Brigid’s parents were given as James and Bridget Flynn (Folan). The address given for 1851 was Cashel, Lettercaumus, in the Parish of Moyrus, in the Barony of Ballynahinch, Co. Galway. The search was returned on 20 April 1920 with the words “Family not found”

 

Margaret Faherty – Application No. D/10 20684. The application was received on 19 September 1910. Officer of Customs and Excise was Oughterard. Margaret’s parents were given as Pat and Anne Faherty. Several place names for the search were given, Cashel, Doonreaghan, Illion East, Illion West, Lawnaghmore and Derryvoreada, in the Parish of Moyrus, in the Barony of Ballynahinch, Co. Galway. The search was returned on 01 October 1910 and “no trace of family” was written next to particulars found.

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Cashel

Griffiths Valuation (1847-1864) shows that the Directors of the Law Life Assurance Co. had a total of 1250 acres, 3roods and 15 perches of land and they leased a house, offices on some of that land to Thomas Hazell for £24 10s for land and £6 for the buildings, they leased a hoiuse and offices on some of that land to Barthol. O’Loughlin for £2 15s for land and £1 5s for buildings. In turn, Barthol. O’Loughlin leased a house, offices and land to Martin Molloy for £2 15s for land and 15s for the buildings. The Directors of the Law Life Assurance Co. leased a house on some of their land to Richard Canavan for £2 15s for land and 8s for the house, in turn Richard Canavan leased that to John Canavan for £2 15s for land and 8s for the house. The Directors of the Law Life Assurance Co. leased land and a house to Patrick Geary for £4 10s for land and 5s for a house. Thomas Hazell leased houses to Anthony Canavan, Mary Spelman, Mary Nash and Mina McDonagh for 5s each. There was a total of 21 acres 1 rood and 7 perches of water in the townland. There were also 2 islands of 3 roods and 32 perches belonging to Thomas Hazell of no agricultural value.

 

1670 Down Survey for Cashel

The 1670 Down Survey name for this area was Cashell. The 1641 owner was the Catholic Murragh O’Flaharty and in 1670 the owner was the Protestant, John Brown. There were 2258 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 201 plantation acres of profitable land and 201 plantation acres were forfeited.

[i]              Information on Daniel got from the R.I.C. Barracks listing.

[ii]              Got from the signature as head of family on the household return.

[iii]             County Offaly

This page was added on 03/07/2018.

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