Ballinafad

Béal an Átha Fada

Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

Townland:                                  Ballinafad

Civil Parish:                                Moyrus

Barony:                                       Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                          Roundstone

District Electoral Division:     Bencorr

Area:                                          755.31 acres / 755 acres, 1 rood, 10 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Roundstone R.C. Parish 1872-1881

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Ballinafad  (no records)

Map

Galway library for Ballinafad

Logainm for Ballinafad

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Ballinafad

 

 

1911 Census for Ballinafad

Overview of Ballinfad in 1911.

The 1911 census shows that there 17 houses in Ballinafad in 1911. House 3 was the Ballinafad National School and was not occupied. All the other houses were listed as being private dwellings. All the houses were constructed of stone, brick or concrete and houses 3-8 had slate, iron or tiled roofing and the rest had thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing. Houses 56 were 1st class dwellings, 2, 13-15 and 17 were 3rd class dwellings and the rest were all 2nd class dwellings. House 14 had 1 room and 1 window in the front. Houses 2, 13, 15 and 17 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, houses 1, 4, 9-12 and 16 had 2 rooms and 3 windows. House 3 had 2 rooms and 4 windows, houses 7 and 8 had 3 rooms and 3 windows, house 5 had 5 rooms and 7 windows and house 6 had 6 rooms and 13 windows. The out-offices and farm-steadings return (form B2) shows that there were a total of 36 out buildings in the townland and they consisted of 10 stables, a coach house, a harness room, 11 cow houses, 3 calf houses, a piggery, 4 fowl houses, a turf house, a workshop, a store, a forge and an electric power house. The enumerator’s abstract return (form N) shows that there were a total of 66 people living in Ballinafad, 38 male and 28 female. The enumerator was Const. Martin Gilmore.

 

Davit 

The head of the first family in Ballinafad was John (59) who had been married to Bridget (50) for 31 years and in that time they had had 11 children of which 10 had survived. They shared the house at that time with 8 of those children Mary (27), Patrick (26), James (24), Peter (21), Charles (17), Delia (15), Thomas (11) and Joseph (7). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English except Joseph, who only spoke English. Joseph could read only but all the other members of the family could read and write. John was a Postman, Patrick and James were milesman (sic) railway labourers, Peter was a railway porter, Charles was a general labourer and Delia, Thomas and Joseph were scholars. They all shared a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and they had a stable, 2 cow houses and a calf house. John Nee was the landholder.

 

Thornton

The sole occupant of house 2 was Catherin (67), a widow who was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. She spoke both Irish and English but could not read. There was no occupation listed for her. She lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and she had a stable and a cow house.

 

Cummins                           (additional surname: Briheny)

The head of this family was Peter (40) who had been married to his wife, Mary Kate for 2 years and they had had 1 child, James Augustine (1). Also in the house with them at that time was Peter’s brother-in-law, Martin Briheny (13). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Peter spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others so that could indicate that they only spoke English. Apart from baby James Augustine, they could all read and write. Peter was a national school teacher and Martin was a scholar. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling but there was no landholder listed.

 

Lally

The head of the Lally family was the widow Mary (72) and she lived with her son Thomas (27). Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke both Irish and English but only Thomas could read and write. Thomas was a general labourer and they lived in a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and they had a cow house and a fowl house. Mary Lally was the landholder.

 

Melia 

The head of the Melia family in house 5 was John (53) and he had been married to Sarah (50) for 26 years and they had had 14 children in that time and 12 of those had survived. They shared the house with 10 of those children and they were, Patrick (24), John (220, Thomas (18), James (17), Mary (15), Norah (15), Barbara (12), Sarah (8), William (7) and Bridget (5). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English, except William and Bridget for whom there was nothing entered so that could indicate that they only spoke English. All the family could read and write. John (53) was a farmer, Patrick was a motor car driver and domestic servant, John (22) was a footman and domestic servant, Thomas and James were farmer’s sons, Mary and Norah were farmer’s daughters and Barbara, Sarah (8), William and Bridget were scholars. They all lived in a 5 roomed, 1st class dwelling and they had a stable, a cow house, a calf house and a piggery. John Melia was the landholder.

 

Willcox                                (additional surnames: Mathews, Wallace, Stebbeds, Perryman, Hussie, Mansell, Speren and Lougheed)

The head of the household in house 6 was Arthur V. (47) and he had been married to his wife, Marion (47) for 23 years and in that time they had had children, James M. (22) and Katherine K. (20). Also in the house was a visitor, Arnold Mathews (42) and 7 servants, John Wallace (26), Bernard Stebbards (20), Grace Perryman (23), Harriot Hussie (50), Louisa Mansell (22), Edith Speren (26) and Sarah Lougheed (23). There was no entry under the religion heading for Arthur V., Marrion, James M. and Katherine K. were Roman Catholic and all the other members of the household were Church of England. Arthur V. was listed as being an American citizen, Marion, James M. and Katerine K. were listed as American, Sarah Lougheed was born in Co. Sligo, Ireland and the rest were all born in England. There was nothing recorded for any of them under the Irish Language heading so that could indicate that they only spoke English. All could read and write. Arthur V. was a gentleman, Arnold was a J.P. estate manager and all the other servants were listed as domestic servants. They all lived in a 6 roomed, 1st class dwelling and they had a stable, a coach house, a harness room, a turf house, a workshop, a store and an electric power house. Arthur V. Willcox was the landholder.

 

Nee

The sole occupant of house 7 was martin (23) and he was a Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. He could read and write but had nothing entered under the language heading. He was an electrician domestic. The house he lived in was a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and Arthur V. Willcox was the landholder.

 

Ledwidge 

Head of the Ledwidge family in house 8 was Christopher (31) who had been married to Alice (30) for 10 years and in that time they had had 5 children and all of those had survived. They lived with those 5 children and they were Esther (7), Annie (5), William (4), Patrick (2) and Christopher (1mth). Christopher (31) and Patrick were born in Co. Dublin, Alice was born in Co. Meath, Esther and Annie were born in Co. Limerick and Christopher (1mth) was born in Co. Galway. All of the family were Roman Catholic. There was nothing entered under the Irish Language heading so that could mean they only spoke English and Christopher (31), Alice and Esther could read and write, Annie could read only and the rest could not read. Christopher (31) was a gardener domestic servant and Esther, Annie and William were scholars. They all lived in a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and Arthur V. Willcox was the landholder.

 

Kelly                         (additional surname: Toole)

Head of the Kelly family was Patrick (73) and his wife Mary (71) who had been married for 30 years but had no children. Also in the house at that time was a visitor, Stephen Toole (11). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but only Patrick and Stephen could read and write. Patrick was a farmer and Stephen was a scholar. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and they had a stable and a cow house. Patrick Kelly was the landholder.

 

Mongan

The head of this Mongan family was Joseph (52) who had been married to Bridget (40) for 15 years and in that time they had had 5 children and all of those had survived. Four of those children lived with them at that time and they were James (13), Mary (11), Ellen (8) and Joseph (6). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English, except Joseph. Apart from Joseph, they could all read and write. Joseph was a farmer and all the children were scholars. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and they had a stable and a forge. Joseph Mongan was the landholder.

 

Mannion                           (additional surname: King)

The head of this family was Martin (57) who had been married to Margaret (56) for 30 years and in that time they had had 11 children and 9 of those had survived. They shared the house with 5 of their sons, Festy (25), John (23), Martin (22), Patrick (20) and Peter (18) and also in the house at that time was a niece, Mary King (9). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English apart from Mary King. Martin (57) and Margaret could not read but all the others could all read and write. Martin was farmer, Margaret was a housekeeper, Festy and John were farmer’s sons, Martin (22) was a shepherd, Patrick was a labourer and domestic servant, Peter was a cow boy domestic and Mary was a scholar. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and they had a stable, a cow house and a calf house. Martin Mannion was the landholder.

 

Keane 

The head of the family in house 12 was John (71) and Bridget (67) and they had been married for 40 years and in that time they had had 11 children and all of those had survived. They lived with 3 of those children, Catherine (30), James (19) and Penelphia (sic) (16). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but only Catherine, James and Penelphia (sic) could read and write. John was a farmer, Catherine was a farmer’s daughter, James was a farmer’s son and Penelphia (sic) was a scholar. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and they had a stable and a cow house. John Keane was the landholder.

 

Keane 

The head of this Keane family in house 13 was Patrick (32) and he had been married to his wife Agnes (28) for a year but, at that time, they had no children. Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke both Irish and English and both could read and write. Patrick was a railway labourer. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and they had a fowl house. The landholder was John Keane.

 

Carre 

Head of the Carre family was the widow Barbara (80) and she lived with her son John (65). Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke both Irish and English but neither of them could read. John was listed as being a farmer. They shared a single roomed, 3rd class house and they had a fowl house. Barbara Carre was the landholder.

 

Davis

John (55) was the head of this Davis family and he had been married to his wife Mary (46) for 25 years and in that time they had had 11 children of which 10 had survived. They shared the house with 8 of those children and they were Patrick (24), Mary (19), Margaret (15), Michael (12), Sarah (11), Julia (9), John (6) and Joseph (4). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English apart from John and Joseph. John (55) and Joseph could not read, John (6) could read only and the rest of the family could read and write. John was a railway labourer, Patrick was a general labourer domestic, Mary (15) was a farmer’s daughter, Margaret, Michael, Sarah, Julia and John (6) were scholars. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and they had stable and a cow house. John Davis was the landholder.

 

Mannion 

The head of this Mannion family was William (50) and he had been married to Mary (47) for 19 years and they had had 8 children but only 5 of those had survived. Five of their children lived in the house with them and they were Bridget (17), Thomas (15), Margret (12), John (10) and Festy (5). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. William, Mary and Thomas spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing recorded for the others so that could indicate that they only spoke English. William and Mary could not read, Festy could read only and the others could all read and write. William was a farmer, Bridget was listed as a farmer’s daughter, Thomas was a farmer’s son and Margret, John and Festy were scholars. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and they had a stable and a cow house. William Mannion was the landholder.

 

O’Donnell

The head of the last family in Ballinafad was John (50) and he had been married to Bridget (39) for 10 years and they had had 5 children and all of those had survived. Those children lived with them and they were Mary Agnes (9), John Joseph (8), Martin (6), Bridget (4) and Margret Ellen (9mths). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English except Bridget and Margret Ellen. Bridget (39), Bridget (4) and Margret Ellen could not read, Mary Agnes and Martin could read and John and John Joseph could read and write. John was a railway labourer and Mary Agnes, John Joseph and Martin were scholars. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and they had a cow house and a fowl house. John O’Donnell was the landholder.

 

1901 Census for Ballinafad

Overview of Ballinafad in 1901.

The 1901 census shows that there were 13 houses in the townland of Ballinafad in that year. All the houses were occupied and were listed as being private houses. All were constructed of stone, brick or concrete and houses 1, 11, 12 and 13 had slate, iron or tiled roofs and the rest had only thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. Houses 1, 2, 5, 7 and 11-13 were 2nd class dwellings while the rest were 3rd class. House 10 had 1 room and 1 window in the front, houses 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 12 and 13 had 2 rooms and 2 windows. Houses 2, 5, 7 and 11 had 2 rooms and 3 windows and house 1 had 4 rooms and 5 windows. The out-offices and farm-steadings return show that there were a total of 20 out buildings in Ballinafad at that time consisting of 3 stables, 12 cow houses, 4 piggeries and a forge. There were a total of 82 people living in the townland, 45 male and 37 female. The enumerator for the area was Const. Thomas Tuohy.

 

O’Malley                             (additional surnames: Lalley and Lynch)

The first house in Ballinafad was home to the O’Malley family and the head of that family was John (43) and he was married to Sarah (36) and they lived with 9 of their children, Michael (15), Pat (13), John (11), Peter (9), Tom (7), James (5), Mary (4), Honor (3) and Barbrah (sic) (2). Also in the house at that time were John’s father-in-law, John Lalley (81) and a lodger, Thomas Lynch (24). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Tom, James, Mary, Honor and Barbrah (sic) spoke only English but the rest all spoke both Irish and English. Barbrah (sic) and John (81) could not read, Honor could read and the rest of the family could all read and write. John (43) was a farmer, Sarah was a housekeeper, Michael was a farmer’s son, Barbrah (sic) was listed as an infant and the other children were all scholars. Thomas Lynch was a priest, Roman Catholic curate. They all shared a 4 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and John O’Malley was the landholder.

 

Byrne                          (additional surname: Mongan)

The head of the family in house 2 was the widow Mary (62) and her son’s family lived with her and they were all Mongan’s and where her son, Joseph (40), her daughter-in-law, Bridget (30) and grandchildren James (4), Honor (2) and Mary (9mths). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mary (62), Joseph and Bridget all spoke both Irish and English but only Joseph and Bridget could read and write. Mary (62) was a farmer, Joseph was a blacksmith, Bridget was a housekeeper and the children were recorded as being infants. They lived in a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and Joseph Mongan was the landholder.

 

Thornton 

House 3 was home to the married couple Patrick (60) and Catherine (52). Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke both Irish and English and neither of them could read. Patrick was a farmer and Catherine was a housekeeper. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Patrick Thornton was the landholder.

 

Kelly                          (additional surname: Toole)

The head of this family was Pat (58) and he was married to Mary (50) and also in the house at that time was a relative, Peter Toole (14). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Pat and Peter spoke both Irish and English and Mary spoke only Irish. Mary could not read but Pat and Peter could read and write. Pat was a farmer, Mary, a housekeeper and Peter, a scholar. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Pat Kelly was the landholder.

 

Davitt 

The head of the family in house 5 was John (49) and he was married to Bridget (42) and they shared the house with their 8 children, Mary (20), Patrick (18), James (15), John (12), Peter (10), Charles (7), Bridget (5) and Thomas (1). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. No language was listed for baby Thomas, Charles and Bridget could speak English and the rest all spoke both Irish and English. Apart from Bridget and Thomas, the family could all read and write. John (49) was a farmer, Bridget (42) was a housekeeper, Mary was a farmer’s daughter, Patrick and James were farmer’s sons, baby Thomas was described as an infant and the other children were all scholars. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and John Davitt was the landholder.

 

Davis 

The head of this Davis family was John (40) and he was married to Mary (35). They lived with 7 of their children, pat (14), Barbara (11), Mary (9), Maggie (5), Michael (4), Sarah (1) and Agnes (6). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English except baby Sarah, and apart from John, Michael and Sarah, they could all read and write. John was a farmer, Mary (35) was farmers wife and Pat, Barbara, Mary, Maggie and Agnes wee scholars. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and John Davis was the landholder.

 

Mannion

The widow Barbara (70) was the head of this family in house 7 and she shared the house with her son, William (30), her daughter-in-law, Mary (29), her son, Michael (32) and her grandchildren, Delia (7), Thomas (5) and John (1mth). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and William could read, Delia could read and write and the rest could not read. Barbara and Mary were listed as being farmer’s wives, William was a farmer, Michael was an agricultural labourer, John was a farmer’s son and Delia and Thomas were scholars. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class house and Barbara Mannion was the landholder.

 

Mannion 

Martin (48y) was the heads of the family in house 8 and he was married to Margaret (47) and they lived with 7 of their children and they were Bridget (22), Michael (20), Margaret (17), Festus (16), John (14), Pat (10) and peter (7). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and all could read and write except Martin and Margaret (47). Martin was a farmer, Margaret (47) was a farmer’s wife, Bridget and Margaret (17) were farmer’s daughters, Michael and Festus were farmer’s sons and John and Pat were scholars. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Martin Mannion was the landholder.

 

Keane 

The head of this Keane family was John (50) and he was married to Bridget (45) and they shared the house with their 7 children Pat (20), Catherine (21), Martin (16), Maggie (15), Honor (13), James (10) and Penelope (8). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and apart from John and Bridget they could all read and write. John was a farmer, Bridget was a farmer’s wife, Pat and Martin were farmer’s sons, Catherine and Maggie were farmer’s daughters and Honor, James and Penelope were scholars. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and John Kane was listed as the landholder.

 

Carr 

The widow Barbara (71) was the head of this family and she lived with her son John (40). Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke both Irish and English but neither could read. Barbara was a housekeeper and John was a farmer. They shared a single roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Barbara Carr was the landholder.

 

Lally                            (additional surname: Sullivan)

The head of the family in house 11 was Colman (50) and he was married to Mary (45) and they shared the house with 3 of their children, Maggie (17), Peter (15) and Thomas (19) and there was a friend in the house at that time, Honor Sullivan (8). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and, apart from Mary, they could all read and write. Colman, Peter and Thomas were general labourers, Mary was a housekeeper, Maggie and Honor were scholars. They all shared a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and Colman Lally was the landholder.

 

Sweeney 

The widow Mary (54) was the head of the family in house 12 and she lived with her Daughter Julia (29) and son Charles (27). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and Mary could read and Julia and Charles could read and write. Mary was a farmer’s wife, Julia was a farmer’s daughter and Charles was a national school teacher. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling but there was nothing recorded for the landholder.

 

O’Fannell [i]                               (additional surname: King)

The head of the last family in Ballinafad was John (34) and he was married to Bridget (34) and also in the house was a servant, Patrick King (62). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but only John could read and write. John was a railway ganger, Bridget was a housekeeper and Patrick was a Labourer general. They all shared a 2 roomed, 2nd class house and the landholder was the M.G.W Railway Comp.

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Ballinafad

The Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) shows that the main lessors in Ballinafad at that time were the Directors of the Law Life assurance Co. and they had a herd’s house on 71 acres, 1 rood and 37 perches of land with an annual ratable valuation of £32 5s for the land and 5s for the herd’s house. The parochial school leased a house on 4 acres, 2 roods and 30 perches of land from the Directors of the Law Life assurance Co. for no rent but there was a ratable valuation of 15s for the land and £ 15s for the land. R.C. chapel leased a chapel and graveyard of 5 acres, 2 roods and 2 perches at no rent but it had an annual ratable valuation of 15s for the land and £4 10s for the building. There were also 149 acres, 1 rood and 12 perches of water in the townland. The exemptions were, for the Parochial school 15s for the land and £ 15s for the land and for the R.C. chapel and grave yard of 15s for the land and £4 10s for the building.

 

1670 Down Survey for Ballinafad

Other names for this area in the 1670 Down Survey for Ballinafad were Urrasebeg, Litter Veark, Ehariknock, Sheanbeenon, Allice, Erouellough and Ballynumgan Mountain. The 1641 owner was the Catholic Murragh O’Flaharty and the owners in 1670 were the Catholic Richard Martin and Thomas Lynch and the Protestant Edward Browne.

[i] On the house and building return the head of the family was given as John O’Donnell.

This page was added on 11/06/2018.

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