Faul

Na Fáil

Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

Townland:                                Faul

Civil Parish:                              Moyrus

Barony:                                     Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                         Clifden

District Electoral Division:    Clifden

Area:                                         195.90 acres / 195 acres, 3 roods, 24 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Clifden R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Map

Galway Library for Faul

Logainm for Faul

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Faul

 

1911 Census for Faul

Overview of Faul in 1911

The 1911 census shows that there were a total of 10 houses in the townland of Faul with 8 of those occupied. There was a note on the house and building return to say that houses 9 and 10 were “occupied until lately” and that the landholder was Wm Gorham. All the occupied houses were listed as being private dwellings and were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and houses 1 and 8 had a slate, iron or tiled roof while the others all had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. House 1 was a 1st class dwelling and all the others were 2nd class. House 1 had 12 rooms and 10 windows in the front while all the others had 3 rooms and 3 windows. There were a total of 25 out buildings in the townland consisting of 7 stables, a coach house, a harness room, 8 cow houses, a calf house, a fowl house, a turf house, a shed and 2 dog houses. The enumerator’s abstract return shows that there were 42 people in the townland, 22 males and 20 females. 17 men and 12 women were Roman Catholic and 5 men and 8 women were Protestant. The enumerator for the area was Const. James Barrett.

 

Mansfield                    (additional surnames: La Nauze [sic], Kinsella and Quinlisk [sic])

The head of the first family in Faul was George Scott (38) and he had been married to Edith Emma (46) for 6 years and had had 2 children, Norah (5) and Kathleen (3). Also in the house were 3 step children, Anna La Nauze [sic] (20), George La Nauze [sic] (19) and Ellen La Nauze [sic] (17), a nurse, May Kinsella (27) and a house maid, Margaret Quinlisk [sic]. Margaret was a Roman Catholic and born in Kings County[i] and the other members of the household were all Church of Ireland with George Scott being born in Co. Dublin, Norah and Kathleen being born in Co. Galway, May was born in Co. Waterford and Edith Emma, Anna, George and Ellen were born in Co. Fermanagh. Apart from Norah and Kathleen, they could all read and write and there was no profession listed for any of the household. The house was a 1st class dwelling with 12 rooms and had 3 stables, 2 coach houses, 2 harness rooms, 2 cow houses, a calf house, a fowl house, a turf house, a shed and 2 dog houses. The landholder was George S. Mansfield.

 

Conneely

There were 10 members of this family and the head was John (40) and he lived in the house with his wife of 14 years, Anne (39) and their 8 children, Mary (13), Ellen (12), John (9), M. Joseph (7), Festy (6), Stephen (5), Patrick (2) and Willie (7mths). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. The parents spoke both Irish and English while the children all spoke only English. John (40), Anne, Mary, Ellen, John (9) and M. Joseph could read and write. John (40) was a farmer and M. Joseph and Festy were scholars. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 3 rooms and had a stables and a cow house. The landholder was John Conneely.

 

Conneely [sic]

John (70) was the head of this family and he had been married to Bridget (69) for 38 years and they had had 8 children and 6 of those had survived. They shared the house with 2 of those children, Patrick (33) and Maggie (27). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and Patrick and Maggie could read and write. John was a farmer and Patrick was a farm labourer. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 3 rooms and had a stables and a cow house. The landholder was John Conneely.

 

Vaughan

The widow, Anne (80) was listed as being the head of this family and she lived in the house with her son, John (40), her daughter, Margaret (35) and a niece, Mary (18). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and John, Margaret and Mary could read and write. John was listed as being farmer. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 3 rooms and had a stables and a cow house. The landholder was Anne Vaughan.

 

Vaughan

The head of the family in house 5 was Martin (50) and he had been married to Kate (49) for 21 years and during that time they had had 5 children, all of whom had survived. They shared the house with 4 of those children, John (20), Festus (16), Daniel (15) and Delia (13). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and all, apart from Kate, could read and write. Martin was a farmer, John, Festus and Daniel were farmer’s sons and Delia was a scholar. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 3 rooms and had a cow house. The landholder was Martin Vaughan.

 

Connolly

The widow, Mary (71) was listed as being the head of this family and she had been married for 49 years and had had 11 children and 8 of those had survived. She lived in the house with 2 of her sons, Martin (38) and Festus (25). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English and Martin and Festus could read. Both Martin and Festus were farm labourers. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 3 rooms and had a cow house. The landholder was Mary Connolly.

 

Conneely

Pat (70) lived in this house with his wife of 40 years, Honor (72) and they had had 8 children and 7 of those had survived. They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They could speak both Irish and English but could not read. Pat was listed as being a farmer. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 3 rooms and had a stable and a cow house. The landholder was Patk Conneely.

 

Mason

The head of the last family in Faul was the widow, Gertrude (34), who had been married for 6 years and had 3 children, Robert (10), Edward (8) and Charlie (6). Gertrude was listed as being Church of Ireland and born in Cork, Robert was born in Cork and Edward and Charlie was born in Roscommon. Gertrude and Robert could read and write. Gertrude was listed as being a laundress and Robert was a scholar. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 3 rooms. The landholder was Gertrude Mason.

 

1901 Census for Faul (Paul)

Overview of Faul in 1901

There were a total of 9 houses in Faul in 1901 and all were occupied and listed as being private dwellings. All the houses were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and houses 8 and 9 had slate, iron or tiled roofs while the others all had only thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. House 9 was a 1st class dwelling, house 6 was a 3rd class dwelling and all the others were 2nd class. House 6 had 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front, house 9 had 19 rooms and 18 windows in the front and the rest all had 2 or 3 rooms and 3 windows. The out-offices and farm-steadings return shows that there were 35 out buildings, 3 stables, a coach house, a harness room, 7 cow houses, a calf house, 7 piggeries, 3 fowl houses, a boiling house, a barn, 2 turf houses, 6 potato houses and 2 sheds. The enumerator’s abstract return shows that there were a total of 41 people in the townland at that time consisting of 19 males and 22 females with 18 males and 18 females being Catholic and 1 male and 4 females were Protestant. The enumerator for the area was Sergeant William Sullivan.

 

Connolly

John (27) was the head of the first family in Faulk and he was married to Annie (25) and they lived in the house with John’s brother, Michael (16) and 2 of their children, Mary (4) and Ellie (2). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John, Annie and Michael spoke Irish and English and could read and write. John was a farmer and Michael was a farm servant. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 3 rooms and had a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a potato house. The landholder was John Connolly.

 

Connolly

The head of this family was John (56) and he was married to Bridget (52) and they shared the house with 3 of their children, Patrick (21), Bridget (17) and Margret (15). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John, Bridget (52) and Patrick spoke Irish and English and Bridget (17) and Margret spoke only English and the children could all read and write. John was a farmer, Patrick was a farmer’s son and Bridget (17) and Margret were farmer’s daughters. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 3 rooms and had a cow house, a piggery and a barn. The landholder was John Connolly.

 

Connolly

House 3 was home to another Connolly family and the head of that family was Daniel (80), a widower, and he lived in the house with his son, Patt (38), his daughter, Mary (36) and a grandson, Michael (14). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of the family could speak both Irish and English but none of the family could read. Daniel was a farmer, Patt was a farmer’s son, Mary was a farmer’s daughter and Michael was a farm servant. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 3 rooms and had a cow house and a piggery. The landholder was Daniel Connolly.

 

Connolly

Patrick (56) was the head of this Connolly family and he was married to Norah (51) and they shared the house with 3 of their children, Thomas (18), Annie (16) and Ellen (12). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both parents spoke Irish and English but only Annie and Ellen could read and write. Patrick was listed as being a farmer, Thomas was a farmer’s son, Annie was a farmer’s daughter and Ellen was a scholar. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 3 rooms and had a cow house, a piggery and a potato house. The landholder was Patrick Connolly.

 

Connolly

House 5 was also home to a Connolly family and the head of this one was Martin (65) who was married to Mary (60) and they lived in the house with 3 of their children, Martin (26), Norah (20) and Festy (15). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin (65), Mary and Martin (26) spoke Irish and English with Norah and Festy speaking only English and all 3 children could read and write. Martin (65) was a farmer, Martin (26) and Festy were farmer’s sons and Norah was a farmer’s daughter. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 3 rooms and had a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a potato house. The landholder was Martin Connolly.

 

Vaughan

Of the 7 members of this family, Martin (40) was the head and he lived in the house with his wife, Kate (38) and their 5 children, John (11), Mary (9), Festy (6), Dan (5) and Delia (3). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin, Kate, John and Mary could speak both Irish and English and the other children could speak only English. Only Martin, John and Mary could read and write. Martin was listed as being a farmer and John and Mary were scholars. The house was a 3rd class dwelling with 2 rooms and had a piggery and a potato house. The landholder was Martin Vaughan.

 

Vaughan

The widow, Anne (65) was listed as the head of this family and she lived in the house with her son, John (28). Anne spoke only Irish and John could speak both Irish and English and read and write. They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Anne was a farmer and John was a wool weaver. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 2 rooms and had a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a potato house and a shed. The landholder was Anne Vaughan.

 

Reilly                                                              (additional surname: Fox)

Michael (25) was the head of this family and he lived in the house with his wife, Annie (26) and their daughter, Grace (3mths) and also in the house at that time was a visitor, Fannie Fox (15). Michael and Fannie were Roman Catholic and Annie and Grace were Church of Ireland. Michael was born in Co. Clare and the others were all born in Co. Galway. With the exception of baby Grace, they could all speak only English and read and write. Michael was listed as being a dog trainer. The house was a 2nd class dwelling with 3 rooms and had a fowl house and a turf house. The landholder was George S. Mansfield

 

Mansfield                                                        (additional surnames: Reilly and McGrace [sic][ii])

George (28) was the head of the last family in Faul and he lived in the house with his widowed mother, Emily C. (56) and 2 servants, Mary Reilly (50) and Ellen McGrace [sic] [iii] (21). Ellen was a Roman Catholic and the others were members of the Irish Church and all were born in Co. Dublin. They could all read and write and George was a J.P. and landlord, Mary was a cook domestic servant and Ellen was a housemaid domestic servant. The house was a 1st class dwelling with 19 rooms and had a stable, a coach house, a harness room, a cow house, a calf house, a fowl house, a boiling house, a turf house, a potato house and a shed. The landholder was George S. Mansfield

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Faul

John Conneely – Application No. C/20 4943, Ref No. Cen/S/11 377. The application was received on 9th April 1920 with an address at that time of Mr. John Conneely (Dan), Polreavagh, Ballyconneely, Clifden, Co. Galway.  John’s parents were given as being Dan and Mary Conneely. The address given for the 1851 search was Faul, in the Parish of Moyrus, in the Barony of Ballynahinch, Co. Galway. The search was returned on 5th May 1920 with the hand written note: Married 1822, Mary Conneely 50 mother ‘widow’, Daniel Conneely 50 father died 1846. No return of applicant John.

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Faul

The Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) shows that the immediate lessor for the townland of Faul was Thomas Geoghegan and that le leased all the tenements in the townland.

 

Patrick King paid £4 7s for 7 acres, 1 rood and 4 perches of land and 5s for a house, Patrick Corneely [sic] paid £6 10s for 23 acres and 28 perches of land and 5s for a house and Honoria Vaughan leased a house and office on 11 acres and 20 perches of land for £2 4s for the land and 12s for the buildings. Christopher Vaughan leased a house with 12 acres, 3 roods and 4 perches of land for £2 17s for the land and 5s for the house, James Fitzpatrick paid £2 5s for 13 acres and 1 rood of land and 5s for the house and John McDonald paid £1 12s for 13 acres and 13 perches of land. Martin Hart paid £4 10s for 10 acres of land and 3s for a herd’s house and Patrick Conneely and others leased 2 plots of bog land, the first of 2 acres and 3 roods and the second of 2 acres, 2 roods and 23 perches for which they paid 10s for each plot. Patrick Duane leased 2 tenements, the first was 1 acre, 2 roods and 10 perches of land for 6s and the second was a house and office on 13 acres. 1 rood and 34 perches of land for which he paid £7 14s for the land and £3 for the buildings. James Vaughan paid £2 5s for 9 acres of land and 5s for a house and office, Simon Conneely paid £3 for 12 acres and 14 perches of land and 5s for a house and Eleanor Ruby leased 2 tenements, the first was 7 acres 1 rood and 20 perches of land for £2 8s, and the second, a house on 9 acres and 10 perches of land for £4 10s for the land and 12s for the house. Daniel Corneely [sic] paid £2 8s for 6 acres, 3 roods and 35 perches of land and 12s for a house and offices and Martin Hart and William Carty jointly leased 7 acres, 1 rood and 4 perches of land for which they each paid £1 15s and Martin Hart also had a house and an office for which he paid 10s. Christopher Corneely [sic] leased a head’s house on 6 acres and 3 roods of land for £37s for the land and 3s for the herd’s house, Thomas Joyce leased a house on 7 acres, 1 rood and 30 perches of land for £2 5s for the land and 5s for the house and Michael Adams and John Lydon jointly leased 7 acres, 3 roods and 24 perches of land for which they each paid £1 5s and Michael also had a house for 3s. There were also 2 roods and 30 perches of water in the townland. There was a small island of 2 roods and 32 perches with no agricultural value belonging to Bryan King.

 

1670 Down Survey for Faul

The Down Survey name for this area was Slewkiroggy. The 1641 owners were both Catholic, Thomas McRedmund Joyce and Murrogh McDow Flaharty and in 1670 the owners were the College of Dublin and Maurice Thompson, both Protestant, and Richard Martin, a Catholic.

 

[i] Co. Offaly

[ii] Possibly McQuire

[iii] Possibly McQuire

This page was added on 11/06/2018.

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