Doonreaghan

Dún Riacháin

Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

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Townland:                                Doonreaghan

Civil Parish:                              Moyrus

Barony:                                     Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                         Roundstone

District Electoral Division:    Moyrus

Area:                                         161.00 acres / 160 acres, 3 roods, 39 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Roundstone R.C. Parish 1872-1881

Map

Galway Library for Doonreaghan

Logainm for Doonreaghan

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Doonreaghan

 

1911 Census for Doonreaghan

Overview of Doonreaghan in 1911

The census of 1911 shows that there were only the 2 houses in the townland at that time. Both houses were occupied and were listed as being private dwellings. They were both built of stone, brick or concrete walls and had slate, iron or tiled roofs. House 1 was listed as a 1st class dwelling and house 2 was a 2nd class dwelling. House 1 had 4 rooms and 8 windows in the front, and house 2 had 2 rooms and 3 windows. The out-offices and farm-steadings return (form B.2) shows that there were a total of 10 out buildings in the townland, consisting of 1 stable, 5 cow houses, 2 calf houses, a fowl house and a turf house. There were a total of 7 people in the townland at that time, 2 male and 5 female. The enumerator was Const. John Kelly.

 

Hazell                         (additional surnames: Russell, Kendall and Geary)

The head of this family was the widow Mary (78) and she had been married for 54 years and in that time she had had 13 children and 11 of those had survived. She shared the house with her daughter Emily Russell(47), who had been married for 21 years and in that time she had had 2 children, both of which had survived but no record of her husband on this census. Also in the house were Mary’s daughter, the widow Elizabeth Mary Kendall, who had been married for 28 years and had had 4 children of which 3 had survived, Mary’s daughter, Lilian (sic)(41), her grandson, Nicholas Edward Kendall (20) and a servant, Mary Geary (18). Nicholas Edward was born in Co. Waterford and the others were all born in Co. Galway Mary Geary was a Roman Catholic while all the others were Church of Ireland. There was nothing entered under the Irish Language heading so that could indicate that they all only spoke English. All could read and write. Nicholas Edward was a medical student and Mary Geary was a cook domestic servant. The house they all lived in was a 4 roomed, 1st class dwelling with a stable, 5 cow houses, 2 calf houses, fowl house and a turf house. Thomas Hazell of Cashel was the landholder.

 

Lee

The sole occupant of the second house in Doonreaghan was John (28). He was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. He could read and write and spoke Irish and English. He was listed as being a gardener domestic servant. He lived in a 2 roomed 2nd class dwelling. The landholder was Thomas Hazell of Cashel.

 

1901 Census for Doonreaghan

Overview of Doonreaghan in 1901

The census of 1901 shows that there were 3 houses in the townland of Doonreaghan. All were occupied and were listed as being private dwellings. All were built of stone, brick or concrete walls and had slate, iron or tiled roofs. House 3 was a 1st class dwelling, house 2 was a 2nd class dwelling and house 1 was a 3rd class dwelling. Houses 1 and 2 had 2 rooms and 2 window in the front and house 3 had 6 rooms and 10 windows. There were a total of 8 out buildings all belonging to house 3. There were 7 people in the townland at that time, 3 male and 4 female. The enumerator for the area was Const. Michael Begley.

 

Canavan

The widow Nancy (65) was the head of this family and she shared the house with her son Anthony (24). they were both Roman Catholics and were born in Co. Galway. Both spoke Irish and English and could read and write. Nancy was listed as being a farmer and Anthony was a farmer’s son. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and the landholder was Thomas Hazell.

 

Reilly

The head of this family was John (32) and he lived with his wife Kate (30). They were both Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Cavan. They both spoke only English and could read and write. John was a gardener domestic servant. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and Thomas Hazell was the landholder.

 

Hazell                         (additional surname: Folan)

The head of the last house in Doonreaghan, although listed as a daughter, was Linian (sic) (30) and she lived with Samuel (28), who was listed as a son[i], and a servant Bridget Folan (18). Bridget was a Roman Catholic and Linian (sic) and Samuel were Church of Ireland and all 3 were born in Co. Galway. Bridget could speak Irish and English but there was nothing entered for Linian (sic) and Samuel so that could indicate that they only spoke English. All 3 could read and write. Linian (sic) and Samuel had no occupation and Bridget was a cook domestic servant. They lived in a 6 roomed, 1st class dwelling and Thomas Hazell was the landholder.

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Doonreaghan

Margaret Faherty – Application No. D/10 20684. The application was received on 19 September 1910 and the office of Customs and Excise was Oughterard. Margaret’s parents names were given as Pat and Anne Faherty. There were a list of townlands to search and those were Cashel, Doonreaghan, Illion East, Illion West, Tawnaghmore and Derryvoreada. These were all in the Parish of Moyrus, in the Barony of Ballynahinch, Co. Galway. The search was returned on the 1st October 1910. Particulars found resulted in “No trace of family”

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Doonreaghan

The Directors of the Law Life Assurance Company leased 156 acres, 3 roods and 29 perches of land with a herd’s house to Thomas Hazel for which he paid £26 for the land and 5s for the herd’s house. Thomas Hazell leased houses to William Fleming, Patrick Reilly and Anne Geary for 5s each annually. The Directors of the Law Life Assurance Company leased a police barracks and offices on 2 acres and 10 perches of land to the constabulary force for 10s for the land and £6 for the buildings. There were exemptions for the police barracks of 10s for the land and £6 for the buildings.

 

1670 Down Survey for Doonreaghan

The 1670 Down Survey name for this area was Slewkiroggy. The 1641 owners were the Catholic Thomas McRedmond Joyce and McDow Murrogh. In 1670 the owners were the Protestant college of Dublin and Maurice Thompson and the Catholic Richard Martin.

[i]              Possibly the head of the family was away at the time and Linian and Samuel were brother and sister.

This page was added on 03/07/2018.

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