Addergoole

Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Addergoole

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       2653.92 acres / 2653 acres, 3 roods, 26 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Addergoole  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Addergoole

1670 Down Survey for Addergoole

Logainm for Addergoole

NUI Galway Digital Collections forAddergoole

 

 

1911 Census for Addergoole

Overview of Addergoole in 1911.

The 1911 census lists 9 buildings of which 7 were inhabited in Addergoole. The 2 houses that were uninhabited were house 7 and house 9, with the landholder of these 2, as well as all the buildings in Addergoole, was the Duke of Manchester. All the houses were recorded as being private dwellings. All houses had stone, brick or concrete for walls. The roofing material on house 1 was thatch, wood or other perishable material and the others had slate, iron or tiles. Houses 1,2,3,4 and 8 were 2ndclass dwellings and houses 5 and 6 were 3rdclass. House 1 had 2 rooms and 3 windows in the front, house 2 had 3 rooms and 1 window, house 3 had 6 rooms and 3 windows in the front, house 4 had 2 rooms and 4 windows, house 5 had 2 rooms and 1 window, house 6 had 1 room and 1 window and house 8 had 2 rooms and 5 windows. The out offices and farm-steadings return records there were a total of 2 stables, 4 cow houses, 4 calf houses, a piggery, 83 fowl houses, a boiling house, 3 barns, a turf house, a workshop, 9 sheds, 8 stores, a forge, 2 incubator houses, a larder and a saw mill. There were a total of 22 people, 14 male and 8 female. The enumerator was Const. Theo Casey.

 

Hastings family

The Hastings family consisted of 4 members according to the 1911 census. Head of the family was Patrick (60) who had been married to his wife Catherine (59) for 33 years in which time they had had 10 children of which 7 survived, Living in the house at that time were two of their children, Dominick (26) and Angela (12). Patrick and Catherine are listed as having both Irish and English as languages and Patrick could read and the others could both read and write. All the family were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick’s occupation is listed as being a forester, Dominick’s as being a motor driver and Catherine was a scholar. The house they occupied was a 2ndclass, 3 roomed dwelling, with a cow house. The landholder was the Duke of Manchester.

 

Clark family

The Clark family consisted of 6 members headed by Charles Andrew (29) who had been married for 8 years to his wife (?) (30) and they’d had 4 children all of which survived. At the time of the 1911 census their 4 children lived with them and they were Charles Williams (7), Harry (5), Mabel Emmeline (3) and Lilian Mary (2). They all had English as a language and Charles Andrew, his wife and Charles Williams are listed as being able to read and write. All were born in England and were members of the Church of England. Charles Andrew was a poultry exporter and Charles Williams and Harry were scholars. They occupied a 2ndclass, 6 roomed dwelling with a barn and and 2 stores. The landholder was the Duke of Manchester.

 

Smith

The only listed inhabitant of house 3 in Addergoole was James (25) a poultry farmer (manager). James could read and write and was the a member of the Church of Ireland, but nothing is listed for where he was born or what language(s) he had. He lived in a 2ndclass, 14 roomed house with 83 fowl houses, a turf house, 2 stores and 2 incubator houses. The Duke of Manchester was the landholder.

 

Nee

House 4 in Addergoole at this time also only had the 1 occupant, that being Michael (47), who is listed as being married. Michael could read write and had both Irish and English languages. He was born in Co. Galway and was Roman Catholic. His occupation is listed as a land steward. He lived in a 2ndclass, 2 roomed house with 2 stables, 2 cow houses, 4 calf houses, a piggery, a boiling house, 2 barns, a workshop, 9 sheds, 4 stores, a forge, a larder and a saw mill. The Duke of Manchester was the landholder.

 

Dunn               ( additional surnames: Wallerand Kelly)

House 5 housed 3 servants Joseph Dunn (27), Joseph Waller (26) and Owens Kelly (14). Joseph Dunn could read while the other two could both read and write. Joseph Dunn was born in Co. Armagh and was a member of the Irish Church, Joseph Waller was born in Scotland and a member of the Church of Ireland and Owens was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. All three were game keepers. They shared a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house and the landholder was the Duke of Manchester.

 

Nee                  ( additional surnames: Kane)

House 6 had 3 more servants, Thomas Nee (19), Patrick (16) and Michael Kane (16). All three were cowmen. All three could read and write and had both Irish and English language. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. The house they occupied was a 3rdclass, 1 roomed dwelling and the landholder was the Duke of Manchester.

 

Aspell Family             ( additional surnames: Staunton)

House 7 in the 1911 census for Addergoole was unoccupied so house 8 was the Aspell household. Head of the family was Bridget (22), who was married but her husband is not listed in this household at this time. Living in the house with her were her daughter Nora (9 mths), her sister-in-law Anne (38) and her nephew John William Staunton (15). There is nothing listed for any of them under language, Anne could read and both Bridget and John William could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John William is listed as being a general labourer. The house they occupied was a 2ndclass, 2 roomed house with a cow house and the landholder was the Duke of Manchester.

 

 

1901 Census for Addergoole

Overview of Addergoole in 1901.

The 1901 census for Addergoole lists 10 buildings. Houses 1,3,4,6 and 8 were listed as lodging houses and houses 2,5,7,9 and 10 were private dwellings. All buildings had stone, brick or concrete for walls and houses 7 and 9 had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. Houses 2,3,5,6,8 and 10 were 2ndclass dwellings and houses 1,4,7 and 9 were 3rdclass dwellings. Houses 1 and 4 had 1 room and 2 windows in the front, houses 7,8 and 9 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, houses 2 had 2 rooms and 3 windows, houses 6 and 10 had 3 rooms and 2 windows, house 5 had 4 rooms and 3 windows and house 3 had 4 rooms and 4 windows. There were a total of 3 cow houses, 2 piggeries, a fowl house, a boiling house and a turf house. There were a total of 38 people, 22 male and 16 female. The enumerator was Const. Thomas Burke.

 

Aspell

The sole occupant of house 1 in Addergoole in 1901 was Thomas (60). Thomas could not read and had not listing under ‘Language’. He was Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Wexford. His occupation is listed as a labourer. The house he lived in was a 3rdclass, 1 roomed house, listed as a lodging house, and the Landholder was Mitchel Henry.

 

Aspell Family             (additional surnames: Staunton)

The Aspell household had 9 members at the time of the 1901 census. Head of the family was Anne (61). In the house with her at that time were her son James (33), Daughter Anne (31), Sons John (29) and Tom (25), daughter-in-Law Winifred (23), daughter Ellen (3mths)[i], son Willie (20) and grandson John W. (4). Anne (61) was born in Co. Monaghan, Winifred was born in England and the other members of the household were born in Co. Galway, All were Roman Catholic. There was no listings for any of them under ‘Language’. Anne (61), Anne (31), Ellen and John W. could not read but all the others could both read and write. The 2 Anne’s are listed as washer women, Tom, a painter, Winifred, a seamstress, Willie, a farmer and John W. was a school boy. They shared a 2ndclass, 7 roomed house with a cow house and Mitchel Henry was the landholder.

 

Keane

House 3 was occupied by John, who was listed as a servant under ‘relation to Head’[ii]. He was born in Co. Galway and a Roman Catholic. He could speak both English and Irish and could also read and write. His occupation is listed as a farm steward. The house he lived in is listed as a lodging house, a 2ndclass, 7 roomed building with the landholder being Mitchel Henry.

 

Brady              (additional surnames: McDonnell)

Living in house 4 were Maggie (24), and Mary McDonnell (21), both listed as being servants under the ‘Relation to Head’ heading[iii]. Both Maggie and Mary could read and write but nothing is listed under ‘Languge’. Both were Roman Catholic, Maggie was born in Co. Cavan and Mary in Co. Galway. Maggie was a laundary maid and Mary was a dairymaid. The house they shared was a 3rdclass, 1 roomed house described as a lodging house and the landholder was Mitchel Henry.

 

Hastings Family

House 5 was the home of the Hastings family that consisted of 8 members. Head of the family was Patrick (46)[iv]and his wife Catherine (42). In the house with them they had 6 of their children and they were Thomas (18), Dominick (16), John (14), Bridget (11), Nora (9) and Angela (2). Patrick and Catherine are listed as having both Irish and English and all except Angela could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick was a forester, Thomas, Dominick and John were labourer’s and Bridget and Nora were scholar’s. Their house was a 2ndclass, 6 roomed house with fowl house, boiler house and a turf house. The landholder was Mitchel Henry.

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Addergoole

According to the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Robert Graham owned the land of Addergoole. He retained 1695 Acres, 3 Roods and 30 Perches of bog for himself for which he paid an annual rate of £20. He leased 913 Acres and 30 Perches to Thomas Eastwood who had a house, offices, gate lodge and other buildings for which he paid £34 for the land and £20 for the buildings annually. Martin O’Flaherty also leased tenements off Robert Graham. He leased 45 Acres, 1 Rood and 35 Perches of land at an annual rate of £1. There was also 4 Acres and 9 Perches of water.

 

 

Ardkyle

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Ardkyle

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       220.48 acres / 220 acres, 1 rood, 36 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

1911 Census for Ardkyle  (no records)

1901 Census for Ardkyle  (no records)

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Ardkyle  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Ardkyle

Logainm for Ardkyle

NUI Galway Digital Collections forArdkyle

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Ardkyle

The Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) records that there was a total of 200 Acres and 31 Perches of land in Ardkyle that was owned by Robert Graham. There also a further 4 Islands of no agricultural value of an area of Acre, 1 Rood and 20 Perches. Robert Graham leased tenements to a number of people, some of which leased houses to a 3rdparty. Edward Joyce and John Conneely leased an area of 15 Acres, 3 Roods and 5 perches fro Robert Graham. They had a house on the land and John Conneely also had an office. They paid an annual valuation rate of £1 15s for the land and Edward Joyce paid 10s for the house and John Conneely paid 5s for the buildings. Thomas Coyne leased 7 Acres and 36 Perches that included an office and a house. He paid £2 3s for the land and 7 s for the buildings. John Folan leased the house from Thomas Conneely at a rate of 5s annually. John Quigley leased 11 Acres, 2 Roods and 14 Perches from Robert Graham on which there was a house and office. He paid an annual rate of £4 for the land and 10s for the buildings. Peter Joyce leased 4 Acres and 18 Perches of land that included houses and an office. His annual ratable valuation was £1 7s for the land and 8s for the buildings. He further leased houses to Judith Flynn, Margaret Joyce and Michael McDonnell for 5s each annually. Thomas Davis leased 8 Acres, 3 Roods and 38 Perches from Robert Graham that included a house and office. His annual ratable valuation was £3 10s for the land and 10s for the buildings. Christopher Conneely and William Conneely jointly leased an area of 12 Acres, 1 Rood and 31 Perches of land on which Christopher also had a house. Christopher paid £3 for the land and 5s for the house while William paid £1 10s for his share of that land. John Joyce and Mary Joyce each leased a house from Robert Graham at an annual rate of 5s each. Thomas and Martin Rowan leased 8 Acres, 1 Rood and 36 Perches of land from Robert Graham at a rate of £1 10s each. Robert Graham leased 2 Acres, 3 Roods and 15 Perches of land to Patrick King at an annual rate of £1 5s. Peter Conneely and Martin Keane leased 2 Acres, 3 Roods and 32 Perches of land at a rate of 12s each. Gregory Conneely leased 2 Acres and 3 Roods of land at a rate of 15s. Myles burke leased 1 Acre, 3 Roods and 17 Perches of land for 7s annually.  Bridget Conneely, Thomas and Martin Rowan jointly leased an area of 2 Acres, 2 Roods and 8 Perches from Robert Graham for Bridget paid 4s and Thomas and Martin paid 2s. William Staunton and Laurence Heaney jointly leased 2 Acres and 15 Perches of land for 3s each. Richard Davis and John Coyne leased 1 Acre, 1 Rood and 3 Perches of land from Robert Graham at an annual rate of 2s each. Tenants of the townland also leased 124 Acres, 2 Roods and 3 Perches of mountain land at £2 10s annually.

 

1670 Down Survey for Ardkyle

The 1670 Down Survey names for this area were Mamffin and Ardkell. The 1641 owner was Edmund O’Flaharty who was a Catholic and the 1670 owner was Richard, Earl of Westmeath, also a Catholic.

 

 

Attirowerty

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Attirowerty

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       367.29 acres / 367 acres, 1 rood, 6 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

Map

Galway Library for Attirowerty

Logainm for Attirowerty

NUI Galway Digital Collections forAttirowerty

 

 

1911 Census for Attirowerty

Overview of Attirowerty in 1911.

In the 1911 census there were 12 houses recorded in Attirowerty. All houses were listed as private dwellings. All houses had stone, brick or concrete walls with house 3 having slate, iron or tiles for roofing and all the rest having thatch, wood or other perishable materials. Houses 1,3, 6 10,11 and 12 were 2ndclass dwellings with houses 2,4,5,7,8 and 9 being 3rdclass. Houses 2,3,4,5,7,8 and 9 had 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front and houses 1 ,6,10,11 and 12 had 2 rooms and 3 windows. There were a total of 3 stables, 11 cow houses, 9 calf houses, 7 piggeries and 1 shed. There were a total of 51 people, 25 male and 26 female. The enumerator was Const. John Hickey.

 

Conneely Family                    (additional surnames: Coyneand Fraser)

House one was occupied by the Conneely family and the head of the family was John (30). He had been married to his wife Mary (37) for 2 years and they had had 1 child. In the house at that time were their daughter Mary (1), their niece Brigid Coyne (14), John’s sister Mary (25) and a Boarder Betty Fraser (86). All, except Mary (1), both Irish and English languages, Mary (1) and Betty could not read but the others could read and write. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John is listed as being a farmer, Mary (25), a farmer’s daughter and Brigid a scholar.  They lived in a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable, cow house, calf house and a piggery. John Conneely was the landholder.

 

Heanue

The sole occupant of house 2 was the widow Mary (75) who had had 5 children of which 3 survived. She could not read, but could speak both Irish and English. She was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. She had a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Pat Heanue was the landholder.

 

Heanue family                        (additional surname: Doherty)

House 3 consisted of 7 occupants. Head of the family was Pat (53) who had been married to his wife Bridget (51) for 32 years and they had had 11 children of which only 6 survived. With them in the house were their children William (21), Paul (16), Gregory (14), Martin (10) and a niece Mary (14). Pat and Bridget are listed as having Irish and English but could not read. The others had nothing listed under Language but could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic.Pat is listed as a farmer, William and Paul as farmer’s sons and Gregory, Martin and Mary as scholars. They had a 2 roomed 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house. Pat was the landholder.

 

Mullen Family                                    (additional surnames: Conneelyand Ribbon)

The head of the Mullen family was Festus (54) and his wife Ellen (37) who had been married for 6 years but had no children. In the house at that time were a visitor Mary Conneely (90) and a niece Kate Ribbon (8). All could speak both Irish and English, Festus and Mary could not read, Ellen could read and Kate could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Festus is listed as a farmer and Kate as a scholar. They occupied a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable, cow house and calf house. Festus Mullen was the landholder.

 

Mullen family

The Mullen family in house 5 consisted of  8 members. The head of the family was John (50) who had been married to his wife Kate (44) for 16 years and they had had 7 children of which 6 survived. Living with them were their 6 children Bridget (15), James (13), Mary (10), Michael (8), Martin (4) and Kate (10 mths). John, Kate (44), Bridget, James and Mary could speak both Irish and English but there is nothing listed for the others. Kate (44), Martin and Kate (10mths) could not read, the others could read and write.  All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John was a farmer, Bridget a farmer’s daughter and James, Mary and Michael were scholars. The occupied a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and calf house. John Mullen was the landholder.

 

Lacey family

There were 3 occupants of house 6 with the widow Bridget (73) as the head. She had given birth to 5 children of which 4 survived. In the house with her at that time were 2 of her children Mary (55) and Robert (40). All could speak both Irish and English but only Robert could read and write. All 3 were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mary is listed as a farmer’s daughter and Robert a farmer’s son. They occupied a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house and piggery. Bridget Lacey was the landholder.

 

Faherty Family                       (additional surnames: Heanue)

Mary (74), a widow, was the head of the family that occupied house 7. Living with her in the house were her daughter Mary Heanue (43), her son-in-law Michael Heanue (50), Her grandson Michael Heanue(4) and 2 servants, John Heanue (19) and Maggie Heanue (16). Mary and Michael had been married for 12 years and had ha 3 children of which only 1 survived. All, except for Michael (4), are listed as having both Irish and English. Mary Heanue, John Heanue and Maggie Heanue could read and write but the others were not able to. All were Roman Catholic, John and Maggie were born in England and the rest in Co. Galway. Michael Heanue (50) was a farmer, Michael (4) a farmer’s son, John Heanue a farm aevant and Maggie a general servant domestic. They occupied a 2 roomed 3rdclass house with a cow house, calf house and piggery. Mary Faherty was the landholder.

 

Adams Family                                    (additional surnames: Clisham, Costello)

House 8 was occupied by 5 people with Maggie (77) who was a widow and had had 3 children. Living with her in the house at that time were her daughter Bridget Clisham (55) who was also a widow and had had 6 children of which 5 survived, her son Peter Clisham (19), her grandsons Joseph Costello (5) and Frank Costello (4). Maggie, Bidget and Peter could all speak both Irish and English. Maggie, Joseph and Frank could not read, Bridget could read only and Peter could read and write. All were Roman Catholic, Joseph and Frank were born in America and the rest in Co. Galway. Bridget was a house keeper, Peter a farmer and Joseph and Frank were scholars. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house, calf house and piggery.  Margaret Adams was the landholder.

 

Corbett Family

The head of the Corbett family was Peter (77) and his wife Mary (72) who had been married for 50 years but had had no children. In the house with them at that time was their nephew Michael (55). All 3 could could speak both Irish and English and also read and write. They were all Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Peter was a farmer and Michael a farmer’s son. The house they occupied was a 2 roomed 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and calf house. The landholder was Peter Corbett.

 

Corbett Family

Another Corbett family lived in house 10. The head of this family was Festus (78) along with his wife Mary (68) who had been married for 43 years and had had 6 children. With them in the house were their 2 sons, Michael (32) and Mathias (30). All could speak both Irish and English, Festus and Mary could read and Michael and Mathias could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Festus was a farmer and Michael and Mathias were listed as farmer’s sons. They lived in a 2 roomed 2ndclass house with a Cow house, calf house and a piggery.  Festus Corbett was the landholder.

 

Faherty Family

Head of the Faherty family was John (63) with his wife Anne (60) who had been married for 38 years and they’d had 6 children of which 4 had survived. Occupying the house with them were 2 of their children Michael (33) and Mary Agnes (29). All could read and write and all spoke both Irish and English. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. John was a farmer, Michael a farmer’s son and Mary Agnes, a farmer’s daughter. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass house with a stable, cow house, calf house, piggery and shed. John Faherty was the landholder.

 

Darcey Family                                    (additional surnames: Gibbons)

The lasy house in the 1911 census was that of the Darcey family. Head of the family was the widow Mary (71) who had had 6 children, all of which survived. Living with her were her daughter Maggie Gibbons (40) and her son-in-law Martin Gibbons (34). Martin and Maggie had been married for 6 years and had had 2 children. Mary’s grandchildren Mary Gibbons (3) and Michael Gibbons (1) also lived with them along with a servant John Gibbons (18). Mary (71), Maggie and Martin spoke Irish and English, there is nothing recorded for the others. Maggie, Martin and John could read and write but the others could not read. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin was a carpenter and John was a farm servant. They lived in a 2 roomed, 2ndclass house with a Cow house, calf house and piggery. Mary Darcy was the landholder.

 

1901 Census for Attirowerty

Overview of of Attirowerty in 1901

There were 14 houses recorded in Attirowerty in the 1901 census. House 11 is listed as a lodging house with all the rest being private dwellings. All the buildings had stone, brick or concrete for walls and thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofs. House 11 was a 4thclass house, houses 1,6 and 8 were 2ndclass houses and all the rest were 3rdclass dwellings. House 11 is listed as having no rooms or windows[v]. Houses 2,3,6,8 and 9 had 1 room and 1 window in the front, houses 4,5,10,12 and 14 had 1 room and 2 windows and houses 1,6 and 8 had 2 rooms and 3 windows. The out offices and farm-steadings return lists a total of 25 buildings, those being 4 stables, 14 cow houses, 3 piggeries, 3 barns and a potato house. There were a total of 46 people, 21 male and 25 female. The enumerator was Const. Edward Robinson.

 

Corbett Family

The head of the Corbett family was Festus (63) and his wife Mary (40). With them in the house were his children Michael (22), Mathias (20) and Margaret (18). Festus and Mary had both Irish and English but the others only had English. Festus could read but the rest could both read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Festus was a farmer, Mary, a farmer’s wife, Michael and Mathias, farm labourers and Margaret a farmer’s daughter. They lived in a 2 roomed, 2ndclass house with a cow house and piggery. Festus Corbett was the landholder.

 

Lydon Family                        (additional surnames: Mongan, King)

The Lydon house consisted of 4 people. The head of the family was the widow Mary (63) and with her were her son Michael (22), brother, John (75) and Granddaughter Bridget (8). Mary and Michael are listed as having both Irish and English, John is listed as deaf and dumb. Mary and John could not read but Michael and Bridget could read and write. Mary is listed as a farmer, Michael, as a farmer’s son, John, as a retired farmer and Bridget as a scholar. They lived in a 1 roomed, 3rdclass house with a cow house and a barn. Mary Lydon was the landholder.

 

Adams Family                                    (additional surnames: Clisham)

In house 3 the head of the family was the widow Margaret (60). In the house with her were her widowed daughter Bridget Clisham (40), her grand children, ?[vi]Clisham (17), Selina Clisham (15), Michael Clisham (13) and Peter Clisham (9). All could speak both Irish and English with Margaret not being able to read, Bridget could read only and the rest could both read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Margaret was in farming, Selina, a domestic servant cook, first granddaughter (17), a farmer’s daughter, Selina, a domestic servant cook and Michael and Peter were scholars. They lived in a 1 roomed 3rdclass house with a barn. Margaret Adams was the landholder.

 

D Arcey (sic) Family

The head of this family was Hugh (62) and his wife Mary (52). Living with them were their children Margaret (28), John (20) and Jane (17). Hugh could speak Irish and English, Mary could speak only Irish and the others only English. Hugh and Mary could not read but the others could all read and write.  All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Hugh was a farmer, Margaret, a seamstress, John, a farmer’s son and Jane a scholar. They lived in a 1 roomed, 3rdclass house with a cow house and a piggery. Hugh D Arcey (sic) was the landholder.

 

Faherty Family                       (additional surnames: Heanue)

House 5 is the Faherty household  with the head of the family being the widow Mary (70). With her in the house were her daughter Mary Heanue (40) and Michael Heanue (40)[vii]. All could speak both Irish and English. Mary (70) could not read, Mary (40) could read and write and Michael could read only. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mary (70) was a farmer, Mary(40) a farmer’s daughter and Michael an engine driver. They lived in a 1 roomed, 3rdclass house with 2 cow houses. Mary Faherty was the landholder.

 

Conneely Family                    (additional surname: Coyne)

The Conneely family had John (58) as the head of the family. He lived in the house with his wife Bridget (56), Their children Michael (26), John (23) and Mary 19 and also their granddaughter Bridget (3). Bridget could speak English with all the others speaking both Irish and English. Bridget (3) could not read, Bridget (56) could read only and the rest could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John (58) was a farmer, Bridget (56) a house keeper, Michael is listed as being a general servant, John (23) is listed as work on farm, Mary as work in house and Bridget (3) as a scholar. They lived in a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with 2 cow houses. John Conneely was the landholder.

 

Mullen Family

House 7 was the home of the Mullen family. The widow Winifred (69) was the head of the family. Living with her were son John (32), her daughter- in-law Kate (30), Her granddaughters Ellen (13) and Bridget (5) and her grandson James (3). Winifred and James could not read, Bridget could read only and the rest could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Winifred was listed as being a farmer, John, a farmer’s son, Kate, a farmer’s daughter and Ellen and Bridget as scholars. They lived in a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable and a cow house. Winifred Mullen was the landholder.

 

Lacey family

The head of the Lacey family in house 8 was Edward (78) along with his wife Bridget (65), also in the house were their children Mary (39) and Robert (30). They could all speak both Irish and English but only Robert could read and write. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Edward was a farmer, Mary, a dress maker and Robert was a farmer’s son. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with stable, cow house and piggery. Edward was the landholder.

 

Faherty Family

The Faherty family consisted of 4 members with John (52) as the head. He shared the house with his wife Anne (50) and their children, Michael (22) and M. Agnes (19). John and Anne could speak both Irish and English with Michael and M. Agnes only speaking English. John and Anne are listed as being farmers, Michael was a farmer’s son and M. Agnes was a dress maker. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. The house they lived in was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable, 2 cow houses and a barn.  John Faherty was the landholder.

 

Mullen Family

The Mullen household in house 10 had Festus (36) as the head. With him in the house was a servant Patrick (19). Festus is recorded as having both Irish and English and both of them could read and write. Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Festus was a farmer and Patrick a farm servant. The house they shared was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and Festus was the landholder.

 

Joyce

The sole occupant of house 11 was Sebina (85). She had both Irish and English languages but could not read. She was born in Co. Galway and was Roman Catholic. She is recorded as being a domestic servant cook. The house she lived in is listed as having no rooms and was a 4thclass dwelling. Mary Lydon was the landholder.

 

Heanue Family

The head of the Heanue family was Patrick (42) along with his wife Bridget (40). Living with them were their children Thomas (18), Patrick (16), Willie (11), Brdget (sic) (8), Gregory (4) and Martin (5mths). Only Patrick (42) and Bridget (40) are listed as having Irish and English, there is no listing for the others. Patrick (42), Bridget (40) and baby Martin could not read, Brdget (sic) could read only but the rest of the family could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick is recorded as being a carpenter, Thomas, as a farm labourer, Patrick, as a postman and Willie and Brdget (sic) were scholars. The house they shared was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable and a workshop. The landholder was Mary Heanue.

 

Heanue Family

House 13 was also a Heanue household. At the head was the widow Mary (60) and living with her were her granddaughter Mary (20) and grandson Paul (6). Only Mary (60) is listed as having both Irish and English language, there is no record in this category for the others. Mary (60) could not read, Paul could read only and Mary (20) could read and write. Mary (20) was born in Scotland with the other 2 being born in Co. Galway. All were Roman Catholic. Mary (60) was a farmer with Mary (20) being a farmer’s daughter and Paul was a scholar. The house they shared was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass house and Mary Heanue was the landholder.

 

Corbett Family                                   (additional surname: Heaney)

The last house in Attirowerty in 1901 was that of the Corbett family. The head of the family was the widow Mary (100). Living with her were her son Peter (49), daughter Mary Heaney (47) and her grandson Michael (39). All spoke both Irish and English. Mary (100) could read only while the rest could read and write. Mary (100) is listed as a farmer, Peter, as a farmer’s son, Mary (47), as a farmer’s daughter and Michael as a farm labourer. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. The house they shared was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with 2 cow houses. Mary Corbett was the landholder.

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Attirowerty

Honor Mullan– Application No. C22 1788. Honor’s application was received on 30/03/1922 and had an address at that time of  Mrs Brigie (sic) Joyce, Moyard Cottage, Clifden Co. Galway. Her parents names were given as Peter and Penelope Mullan. Her search was returned on 03/04/1922 stating found married 1847, no trace.

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Attirowerty

Robert Graham leased tenements in Attirowerty to Michael Conneely, Bridget Heany, Peter Mullen, Anthony Davin, Thomas Mongan, Mary Gannon, Michael Mullen, Mathias Corbett, Michael Joyce, Catherine Joyce and Patrick Mullen. Michael Conneely leased 19 Acres and 3 Roods of land on which he had a house and office. He paid an annual valuation rate of  £2 10s for the land and 15s for the buildings. Bridget Heany leased 13 Acres, 1 Rood and 10 Perches of land on which she had a house. She paid an annual rate of £1 10s for the land and £1 for the house. Peter Mullen leased 18 Acres, 1 Rood and 20 Perches of land and leased some of that further to Anthony Davin. Peter Mullen paid £2 5s for the land and 10s for the house and offices he had and Anthony Davin paid £1 5s for his plot of land and 5s for the house on that land. Thomas Mongan had  9 Acres, 3 Roods and 15 Perches on which he had a house. He also leased part of that land, along with a house, to Mary Gannon. Thomas paid an annual rate of £1 12s for his part of the land and 8s for the house and Mary paid the same for her share. Michael Mullen leased 11 Acres and 10 Perches of land on which he had a house.  He paid £3 3s for the land and 7s for the house. Mathias Corbett leased 23 Acres and 3 Roods of land on which he had a house and offices. He paid £4 for the land and 15s for the buildings. Michael Joyce leased 23 Acres, 1 Rood and 5 Perches of land on which he had a house. He paid £2 15s for the land and 10s for the house. Catherine Joyce leased ( Acres and 3 Roods of land that contained a house for which she paid 15s for the land and 5s for the house. Patrick Mullen had 15 Acres and 3 Roods of land on which he had a house and paid £3 10s for the land and 10s for the house. Robert Graham also had 353 Acres, 2 Roods and 27 Perches of Mountain land for which he paid £4.

 

1670 DownSurvey for Attirowerty

In the 1670 Down Survey other names for this area were Banoage and Attyrowertie. In 1641 the owner was Edmund O’Flaharty, a Catholic and in 1670 the owner was Richard, Earl of Westmeath, also a Catholic

 

 

Baunoge

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Baunoge

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       1059.77 acres / 1059 acres, 3 roods, 3 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

Map

Galway Library for Baunoge

1670 Down Survey for Baunoge

Logainm for Baunoge

NUI Galway Digital Collections forBaunoge

 

1911 Census for Baunoge

Overview of baunoge in 1911

The 1911census records 7 houses in Baunoge, all of which were occupied and listed as private dwellings. All the houses were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. Houses 1 and 6 were 2ndclass dwellings with the rest being 3rdclass. Houses 2,3,4,5 and 7 had 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front of the dwelling and houses 1 and 7 had 2 rooms and 3 windows. Altogether there were a total of 14 out offices and buildings, those being made up of 7 cow houses, 5 calf houses and 2 piggeries. There were a total of 41 people living in Baunoge, 21 male and 20 female. The enumerator was Const. John Hickey.

 

McDonnell Family                             (additional surnames: Mortimer)

House one was the home of the McDonnell family that consisted of 12 members. Head of the family was the widow Mary (70) who had given birth to 12 children of which only 7 survived. Living with her in the house were her daughter Bridget Mortimer (40) who had been married to Philip Mortimer for 12 years and had had 7 children. As well as those, her daughter Kate (24) and son Bartley (23), grandchildren Michael Mortimer (11), Philip Mortimer (10), Festus Mortimer (8), Mary Mortimer (7), Margaret Mortimer (5), John Mortimer (4) and Bridget Mortimer (1) shared the house as well. Mary (70), Bridget (40), Kate, Bartley and Philip (32) are listed as having both Irish and English as languages, there is no record under that heading for the rest[viii]. Mary (70), Margaret, John and Bridget (1) could not read, all the others could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Bartley is recorded as being a shepherd, Philip (32), a farm servant and Michael, Philip (10), Festus and Mary (7) were all scholars. They shared a 2 roomed 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house and calf house. The landholder was Hector R. L. Graham.

 

Mannion Family

The head of the Mannion family was James (65) with his wife Julia (41) who had been married for 18 years and had had 5 children, all of which had survived. In the house with them at that time were 4 of her children, Michael (17), Mary (13), Agnes (12) and Martin (10). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. James and Julia had both Irish and English languages but could not read. The rest of the family had nothing listed in the language column but they could read and write. James was a farmer and Michael a farmer’s son with Mary, Agnes and Martin being scholars. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house. James Mannion was the landholder.

 

Lyden Family

The Lyden family consisted of 6 members with the head of the family being John (71) and his wife Mary (72) who had been married for 36 years and had had 7 children. 4 of their children lived with them and they were Thomas (50), John (34), Peter (28) and Festus (24). John (71) and Mary are listed as speaking Irish and English and all could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John (71) was a farmer, Thomas was an unemployed blacksmith, John (34) and Festus were a farmer’s sons and Peter was a postman. They shared a 2 roomed 3rdclass house with a cow house and a calf house. John Lyden was the landholder.

 

Conneely Family                                (additional surnames: Mullen)

Head of the family in house 4 was Philip (41) with his wife Anne (40) who had been married for 8 years but had no children. Also in the house was Philip’s sister-in-law Honor (66). All spoke both Irish and English and Honor could not read, however, Philip and Anne could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Philip is listed as being a farmer. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and calf house. Philip was the landholder.

 

Connelly Family                                 (additional surnames: McDonnell)

House 5 was also a Conneely household and the head on this family was the widow Mary (49) who had had 12 children of which 10 survived. Her daughter and son-in-law, Anne McDonnell (25) and Festus McDonnell (24), who had been married for a year, lived in the house, as did her other children, Joseph (23), Michael (21), Martin (18), Margaret (17), Bridget (14) Ellen (10). All, except Ellen, are listed as speaking both Irish and English and all except Mary, could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Festus was a farm servant, Joseph, Michael and Martin were farmer’s sons, Margaret was a cook domestic servant, Bridget was a farmer’s daughter and Ellen a scholar. The house they shared at that time was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with a cow house, calf house and a piggery. Mary Conneely was the landholder.

 

Coyne Family

Head of the Coyne family in house 6 was the widow Anne (74) who had had 9 children of which 7 survived. 2 of her children Peter (27) and Ellen (24) lived with her at that time. All had both Irish and English language but only Ellen could read and write.  All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Peter is listed as being a farmer’s son and Ellen a farmer’s daughter. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass house with a cow house, a calf house and a piggery. The landholder was Anne Coyne.

 

Gibbons Family

The head of the Gibbons family was the widow Bridget (60) who had had 10 children but only 5 had survived. Living with her in house was her son Michael (29). Michael could read and write while Bridget could read only.  Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael is recorded as being a farm servant. The house was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed dwelling with a cow house and Pat Lyden was the landholder.

 

1901 Census for Baunoge

Overview of Baunoge in 1901

The 1901 census lists 8 houses in Baunoge all were private dwellings with the exception of house 8 which is listed as a lodging house. All had stone, brick or concrete walls with thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing. All dwellings were 3rdclass houses with the exception of house 8 which was a 2ndclass dwelling. Houses 1 and 5 had 1 room and 1 window in the front of the house, houses 2,3,4 and 7 had 1 room and 2 windows, house 6 had 1 roome and 3 windows and house 8 had 2 rooms and 3 windows. There were a total of 13 out buildings recorded on the out office and farm-steadings return. They were a stable, 8 cow houses and 4 piggeries. There were a total of 44 people living in Baunoge in 1901, 26 male and 18 female. The enumerator was Const. Edward Robinson.

 

Coyne Family                         (additional surnames: Faherty)

House 1 was the home of the Coyne family and the head of the family was Martin (80) and his wife Mary (56). Sharing the house with them were their children Peter (23) and Onnie (sic)[ix](21) and their nephew John Faherty (8). All could speak both Irish and English but only Onnie (sic) and John could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin was a farmer, Peter was a farmer’s son, Onnie (sic) was a farmer’s daughter and John a scholar. The house they lived in was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass house with a cow house and piggery. The landholder was Martin Coyne.

 

Conneely Family

The head of the Conneely family was Peter (55) and his wife Mary (40) and with them in the house were their children Anne (24), Peter (16), Joseph (14) , Michael (12), Martin (9), Maggie (5) and Bridget (3). Peter and Mary had both Irish and English language, but nothing listed for the rest of them. With the exception of Mary, Maggie and Bridget they could all read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Peter (55) was a wool weaver, Anne was a domestic servant and Peter (16), Joseph, Michael, Martin and Maggie were scholars. The home they shared was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and piggery. Peter Conneely was the landholder.

Mannion Family

The head of the Mannion family in house 3 was James (40) and his wife Julia (33). With them in the house at that time were their children Michael (8), Thomas (7), Mary (5), Agnus (sic) (2) and Martin (6mths). James and Julia could speak both Irish and English and only Michael could read and write with Thomas being able to read only. The others could not read. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. James was a farmer and Michael and Thomas were scholars. Their house was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a Stable and a cow house. James Mannion was the landholder.

Heanue Family

The head of the Heanue family was Patrick (45) and his wife Margaret (40). With them in the house were their children Annie (4), Patrick (3) and Anthony (1mth). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick and Margaret are listed as speaking both Irish and English but there is no entry in column for the rest of them. Only Patrick could read and write. Patrick was a farmer and Margaret is listed as a farmer’s wife. They lived in a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house. Patrick Heanue was the landholder.

Lyden

The sole occupant of house 5 was Thaddy(75) who was a widower. He had both Irish and English but could not read. He was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic and is listed as being a farmer. The house he occupied was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house. He was also the landholder.

 

Conneely

House 6 also only had the one occupant and that was Philip (33). Philip had both Irish and English languages and could read and write. He was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. His occupation was a wool weaver. The house he lived in was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass house with a cow house. Philip was also the landholder.

 

Lydon Family

House 7 was the Lydon family household and John (45) was the head of the family. He shared the house with his wife Mary (45) and their children Thomas (19), Bridget (17), John (12), Peter (10) and Festus (8). John (45) and Mary could speak both Irish and English but the rest of the family only had English. Thomas could not read, Mary could read only and the readt could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John (45 was a wool weaver, Mary was a house keeper, Thomas was a farmer, Bridget, a farmer’s daughter and John (12), Peter and Festus were scholars. The house that they lived in was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and John Lydon was the landholder.

 

McDonnell Family                             (additional surnames: Mortimer)

The head of the McDonnell family was Bartley (60) and his wife Mary (45). Also in the house with them at that time were their children Bridget Mortimer (27), John (25), Mary (17), Catherine (14), Bartley (12), Julia (10 and their grandson Michael Mortimer (6mths). Bartley (60), Mary, Bridget and John were listed as having both Irish and English, with nothing entered for the others. Bartley (60), John and Michael could not read, Mary could read only and the rest could read and write. They were all Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Bartley (60) is recorded as being a shepherd, agricultural labourer, John was a farm labourer, Mary (17) and Catherine were domestic servants and Bartley (12) and Julia were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house and a piggery. The landholder was Thomas Graham of Kulkyle.

 

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Baunoge

Anne Coyne–Application No. C21 3276. Anne’s application was received on 03/05/1921 with an address of  John Faherty, Attyrowerty, Moyard Co. Galway. Her parent’s names were given as Peter and Mary Coyne. There are 2 sets of handwritten notes but it is difficult to read all the text in them. Those two sets were crossed out by hand. On the left hand side of the form there is a handwritten list of names and ages as follows;

yrs

Michael           (89)

John                87

Bridget            85

Patrick             83

Thomas           81

Martin                         79

Anthony         77

Philip              75

Maria              73

Anne               71

Honor              69

 

A handwritten note on the right of the form says:

 

NB

Note daughter 1 month

no christian name:

entered  “  So

FW

 

The return search date was the 05/05/1921 stating that Peter and Mary Coyne married in 1831

Added to that on 21/05/1921 was the handwritten note:

 

Sheets              Mick               20 yrs              son

John                18 ”                 “

Pat                   14 ”                 “

Thos                12 “                 “

x          Maria              2 “                   daught

x            “                   1 month              do

 

The application was certified on 31/05/1921 and a copy dispatched to the applicant on 09/06/1921. The original pension awarded was 2s 3d on 18/05/1921, 2s was added on the 26/05/1921 and then a further addition of 9d was added on the 07/06/1921 to give a total pension of 5s.

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Baunoge

The Griffith’s valuation (1847-1864) records that Robert Graham lease a number of tenements to people. John Mullen leased an area of land of 8 Acres, 1 rood and 11 Perches on which there was a house. He paid an annual rate of £1 15s for the land and 10s for the house. James Conneely, John Conneely, Jerimiah Coyne, Thomas Coyne, and Roger Mealy jointly leased an area of land of 44 Acres and 16 Perches. Each of them had a house as well as the land and Jerimiah Coyne also had offices. James Conneely paid £1 3s for the land and 5s for the house, John Connelly paid £1 2s for the land and 5s for the house, Jerimiah Coyne paid £2 5s for the land and 10s for the buildings. Thomas Coyne paid £2 5s for the land and 10 s for the house, Roger mealy paid £2 5s for the land and 5s for the house. John Conneely then leased the house on his part of the land to Rose Moran for 5s and Roger Mealy leased the house he had on the land to John Folan for 5s annually. Mary Folan leased a house from Free (sic) (?) for a rate of 5s. William Yates leased an area of land of 33 Acres from Robert Graham on which he had an office and house. He paid an annual rate of £5 5s for the land and 15s for the buildings. Charles McClinton leased 2 plots of land from William Yates. One area of land was 30 Acres, 3 Roods and 12 Perches and the other was 72 Acres, 3 Roods and 26 Perches. He paid £8 10s for the smaller plot and £9 10s for the larger. Peter Coyne leased some land from an immediate lessor[x]. The land had an area of 14 Acres, 2 Roods and 26 Perches on which there was a house. He paid £4 for the land and 10s for the house. Martin and Peter Coyne leased some land of 7 Acres, 1 Rood and 18 Perches from Robert Graham. Martin had a house and paid £1 7s for the land and 5s for the house. Peter paid 13s for his piece of land. Robert Graham retained 703 Acres, 2 Roods and 26 Perches of land that was mountain and bog land, for which he paid a rate of £6 annually. There was, in addition, 19 Acres of water.

 

 

Cartron

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Cartron

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       240.20 acres / 240 acres, 0 roods, 31 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

1901 Census for Cartron  (no records)

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Cartron  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Cartron

1670 Down Survey for Cartron

Logainm for Cartron

NUI Galway Digital Collections forCartron

 

 

1911 Census for Cartron

Overview of Cartron in 1911

The 1911 census for Cartron only lists 2 houses. Both houses were constructed of stone, brick or concrete and had slate, iron or tiles for roofing. Both were 2ndclass houses with house 1 having 3 rooms and 4 windows in the front and house 2 having 2 rooms and 2 windows. There was a total of 13 out buildings according to the out offices and farm-steadings return. These comprised of a stable, a coach house, a harness room, a cow house, a calf house, a fowl house, a boiling house, a barn, a turf house, a potato house, 2 sheds and a laundary. There was a total of 7 people living in Cartron, 3 male and 4 female. The enumerator was Const. Edmund Moloney.

 

Beattie Family                                    (additional surname: Melia)

The head of the Beattie family in house 1 was John (33) and his wife Magretta (32) who had been married for 4 years and had had 2 children. Sharing the house with them were their children Jessie Rebecca Agnes (3) and Thomas William (1). Also in the house with them was a servant Nora Melia (13). Nothing is listed under ‘Irish Language’[xi]. John, Magretta and Nora could read and write, the 2 younger members of the family could not read. Nora was a Roman Catholic, John and Magretta were Presbyterians and the Jessie Rebecca Agnes and Thomas William were members of the Protestant Episcopalian Irish Church. John and Magretta were born in Tyrone and the rest in Co. Galway. John is listed as being a land steward (domestic servant) and Nora as being a nurse & (scholar) (sic). They lived in a 3 roomed 2ndclass dwelling with a stable, a coach house, a harness room, a cow house, a calf house, a fowl house, a boiling house, a barn, a turf house, a potato house, 2 sheds and a laundary. The landholder was Catherine ?[xii]

 

Francey Family

Head of the Francey family was Samuel (31 and his wife Rebecca (34) who had been married for 1 year. Both had English as a language and could read and write. Samuel was born in Co. Cavan and Rebecca in Co. Tyrone and both were Presbyterians. Samuel is recorded as being a coachman (domestic servant). The house they lived in was a 2ndclass, 2 roomed house. The landholder was Catherine ?[xiii]

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Cartron

According Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Robert Graham owned the land in this area. He leased tenements to Joseph Reville and James Beresford. Joseph leased 99 Acres, 3 Roods and 19 Perches of land on which there were a house and offices. He paid £25 for the land and £8 for the buildings. James leased 93 Acres, 1 Rood and 14 Perches of land which included a house and offices for which he paid £23 for the land and £3 for the buildings. There was also 47 Acres, 3 Roods and 31 Perches of water.

 

 

Clooncree

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Clooncree

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       77.19 acres / 77 acres, 0 roods, 30 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Clooncree  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Clooncree

Logainm for Clooncree

NUI Galway Digital Collections forClooncree

 

1911 Census for Clooncree

Overview of Clooncree in 1911

In the 1911 census there was only the 1 dwelling in Clooncree. It was a 2ndclass house with 2 rooms and 3 windows in the front and was recorded as a private dwelling. It had stone, brick or concrete walls and thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing. There was also a cow house. There were 5 people, 2 male and 3 female. The enumerator was Const. Edmund Moloney.

 

Kane Family

The head of the family in the only house in Clooncree was Thomas (53) and his wife Maggie (30) who had been married for 6 years and had had 3 children. Those 3 children lived with them and were Mary Anne (5), Michael (3) and Bridget (1). Thomas could speak both Irish and English but there was nothing listed under that heading for the rest[xiv]. Thomas and Maggie could read and write but the 3 children could not read. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Thomas was a shoemaker. The house they shared was a 2 roomed 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house. Thomas Kane was the landholder.

 

1901 Censusfor Clooncree

Overview of Clooncree in 1901

According to the 1901 census there were 2 dwellings in Clooncree. Both were described as private dwellings but only one was occupied. They were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofs. They were both 2ndclass dwellings with 2 rooms and 3 windows in the front. The out-office and farm-steading return records that there were a total of 5 out buildings being 1 stable, 3 cow houses and a calf house. There were 2 people, 1male and 1 female living in house 1.

 

Keane Family

The head of the family in the Keane family was the widow Anne (70) and with her in the house was her son Thomas (40). The both could speak Irish and English and Anne could not read but Thomas could read and write. Both were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Anne was a farmer and Thomas was a boot maker. The house they had was a 2 roomed 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Clooncree

Robert Graham owned the land of Clooncree according to the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) and he leased tenements to Thomas Y. Prior and Matthias Burke. Thomas Y. Prior leased 2 plots of land, one of 3 Acres, 1 Rood and 14 Perches and another of 18 Acres, 3 Roods and 15 Perches. He paid and annual ratable valuation of £1 10s for the smaller of those and £8 for the larger. Matthias Burke also leased 2 plots of land. The first plot was of 48 Acres 1 Rood and 32 Perches and had a house and offices on that land. The other plot was of land only and measured 8 Acres, 1 Rood and 4 Perches. For the larger plot he paid £24 for the land and £2 10s for the buildings. The smaller plot had a ratable valuation of £3 10s. In addition there was ! Rood and 8 Perches of water.

 

 

1670 Down Survey for Clooncree

The name for Clooncree in the 1670 Down Survey was Cloonecrech. The 1641 owner was Edmund O’Flaharty who mwas a Catholic and in 1670 the owner was the Catholic Richard, Earl of Westmeath. There were 44 plantation acres of land and the 44 plantation acres were forfeited.

 

 

Cloonederowen

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Cloonederowen

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cleggan

Area:                                       97.88 acres / 97 acres, 3 roods, 20 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

1901 Census for Cloonederowen  (no records)

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Cloonederowen  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Cloonederowen

Logainm for Cloonederowen

NUI Galway Digital Collections forCloonederowen

 

 

1911 Census for Cloonederowen

Overview of Cloonederowen in 1911

There were 9 houses in Cloonederowen in 1911 all of which were occupied private dwellings. They all had stone, brick or concrete walls and thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. Houses 4, 5 and 7 were 3rdclass dwellings with 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front, houses 1,2,3 and 6 were 2ndclass dwellings with 2 rooms and 3 windows. There were a total of 14 out buildings which consisted of a stable, 6 cow houses, 5 calf houses and 2 piggeries. There were a total of 33 people 18 male and 25 female. The enumerator was Const. John Hickey.

 

King Family

House 1 was the home of the King family. Head of the family was Michael (69) and his wife Mary (66) who had been married for 34 years and had had 8 children of which 7 survived. With them in the house lived 3 of their children Patrick (25), Stephen (20) and Mary (13). All 5 of the family could speak both Irish and English and could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael was a farmer and Patrick and Stephen were farmer’s sons with Mary (13) being a scholar. They lived in a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house, calf house and a piggery. Michael King was the landholder.

 

Baker family

House 2 was the Baker household with the head of the family being Michael (48) and his wife Bridget (35) who had been married for 13 years and had had 5 children all of whom survived. Those 5 children lived with them and were Mary (12), John (11), Maggie (9), Ellen (6) and Sarah (1). Michael and Bridget are listed as having both Irish and English but there is nothing listed under that category for the rest[xv]. The only ones that could read and write were Mary, John and Maggie. All were born in Co. Galway and were members of the Catholick (sic) Church. Michael was a farmer and Mary, John, Maggie and Ellen were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass house with cow house, calf house and piggery. Michael Baker was the landholder.

 

Conneely Family

The only 2 of the Conneely family living in house 3 were Anthony (51) and his wife Anne (46) who had been married for 16 years but had no children. They both could speak Irish and English but only Anne could read and write. Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic.Anthony was a farmer. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house and a calf house. The landholder was Anthony Conneely.

 

Coyne Family

The head of the Coyne family was Patrick (72) and his wife Harah (sic)[xvi]. They had been married for 23 years and they’d had 6 children of which 5 survived. Those 5 children lived with them and were Bridget (14), John (11), Mary (8), Martin (6) and Margret (sic) (3). Patrick and Harah (sic) are listed as speaking both Irish and English but nothing is listed for the children[xvii]. Bridget, John, Mary and Martin could read and write, Patrick and Margret (sic) could not read and Harah (sic) could read only. All were born on Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick was a farmer, Bridget was a farmer’s daughter and John, Mary and Martin were scholars. The dwelling they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a calf house. Pat Coyne is listed as the landholder.

 

O’Bácer Family                     (additional surname: O’Bácaear, bean Uí Bácaear)

Head of the family in house 5 was Tiómás (72) and his wife Máire (71) who had been married for 38 years. Also in the house was their son Micheál (35).

 

Faherty Family

The head of the Faherty family in house 6 was the widow Anne (45). Living with her at the time were her children Patrick (20), John (18), Bridget (16), Michael (14), Anthony (12), Stephen (10) and Martin (9). Anne could not read but all the rest of the family could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick, John and Michael are listed as being farmer’s sons, Bridget, a farmer’s daughter and Anthony, Stephen and Martin as scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable, cow house and calf house. Anne Faherty was the landholder.

 

King

The sole occupant of the last house in Cloonederowen was William King (72). He spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. He was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. He is recorded as being a farmer. His house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house. He was also the landholder.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Cloonederowen

According to the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Edmund O’Flaherty owned this land and leased tenements to Martin Mullen, William Armitage, John Gibbons and Thomas C. Butler. Edmund O’Flaherty kept for himself 97 Acres, 1 Rood and 5 Perches of land for which he paid an annual rate of £40. Martin Mullin leased a house at a rate of 7s annually, William Armitage leased a house and office for which he paid £1 annually. John Gibbons leased a forge for 5s and Thomas C. Butler leased 3 Acres, 1 Rood and 18 Perches of land for an annual fee of 15s.

 

 

1670 Down Survey for Cloonederowen

The name for Cloonederowen in the 1670 Down Survey was Cloonaderdaowen. The 1640 owner was Donnell McOwen O’Flahartye who was a Catholic and in 1670 the owner was the protestant Francis Browne. There were 15 plantation acres of profitable land and 15 plantation acres were forfeited.

 

 

Crocknaraw

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Crocknaraw

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       860.27 acres / 860 acres, 1 rood, 2 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) forCrocknaraw  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Crocknaraw

Logainm for Crocknaraw

NUI Galway Digital Collections forCrocknaraw

 

1911 Census for Crocknaraw

Overview of Crocknaraw in 1911

There were 9 houses in Crocknaraw in 1911, all listed as private dwellings. House 2 was uninhabited but the landholder was E. L. Holmes Leigh. All the houses were 2 roomed, 2ndclass houses that were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and Slate, iron or tiled roofs. There were a total of 21 out buildings consisting of  2 stables, 7 cow houses, 5 calf houses, 6 piggeries an a fowl house. There were a total of 31 people, 16 male and 15 female. The enumerator was Const. John Hickey.

 

Coyne Family

The head of the Coyne family was Michael (27) and his wife Florence Emily (30) who had been married for 2 years and had had 1 child. Their son John (9mths) also lived in the house. Michael could speak Irish and English but could not read. Florence Emily could read and write. Michael and John were born in Co. Galway, Florence Emily was born in England and all three were Roman Catholics. Michael is recorded as an agricultural labourer. Their house was 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with fowl house.  The landholder was E. L. Holmes Leigh.

 

King Family

House 3 was the home on the King family with John (73) as the head and his wife Mary (68) who had been married for 42 years and they’d had 12 children of which 10 survived. 3 of their children lived in the house with them and they were Daniel (22), Norah (20) and Catherine (18). They could all speak both Irish and English and the children could read and write but the parents, John and Mary could not read. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John was a farmer, Daniel, a farmer’s son and Norah and Katherine were farmer’s daughters. They shared a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable, cow house and piggery. John King was the landholder.

 

Lyden Family

House 4 was the Lyden household and the head of the family was Michael (69) and his wife Bridget (67) who had been married for 35 years and had had 8 children of which 6 survived. 3 of their children lived with them and they were Maggie (28), Peter (26) and Katherine (19). All the family could speak both Irish and English and all could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael is listed as being a farmer, Maggie and Katherine, as farmer’s daughters and Peter as a farmer’s son. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house, a calf house and a piggery. The landholder was Michael Lyden.

 

Coyne Family

The Coyne family in house 5 consisted of 3 members. The head of the family was John (70) and his wife Mary (70) who had been married for 44 years and had had 9 children, all of whom survived. 1 of their sons, Martin (22) also lived in the house with them at that time. All could speak both Irish and English but only Martin could read and write. All 3 were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John’s occupation is listed as a farmer and Martin’s as a farmer’s son. The house they lived in was a 2ndclass, 2 roomed dwelling with a cow house and a piggery. John Coyne was the landholder.

 

Toole Family

House 6 was the Toole household and the head of the family was John (73) and his wife Honor (74). They had been married for 46 years and had had 5 children but only 1 survived, that was Pat (44) who lived with them. All 3 could speak both Irish and English but only John could read and write. All 3 were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John was a farmer and Pat was listed as a farmer’s son. They shared a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house, calf house and piggery. John Coyne was the landholder.

 

Davis Family                          (additional surname: King)

The Davis household consisted of 7 members with the head of the family being Mary (46). She had been married for 22 years and had had 5 children all of whom survived. Those 5 children lived in the house with her and were John (20), Maggie (18), Michael (15), Theresa (11) and Thomas (7). In addition Mary’s grandmother Maggie King (84) also lived with them. Maggie (84) could not read, Thomas could read and the rest of the family could all read and write. They were all Roman Catholic, John, Maggie and Michael had been born in Australia while the rest of the family were all born in Co. Galway. John and Michael are listed as farmer’s sons and Thersa and Thomas were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house, calf house and a piggery. Mary Davis was the landholder.

 

Lydon Family

The head of the Lydon family was Michael (38) and his wife Norah (29), also in the house with nthem at that time was Michael’s brother John (36). All could speak both Irish and English and all could read and write. All 3 were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both Michael and John were farmers and the house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable, cow house and calf house. Michael Lydon was the landholder.

 

Connor Family

House 9 and last house in Crocknaraw was the home of the Connor family. Head of the family was Pat (72) and his wife Bridget (74). The 2 of them had been married for 44 years and had had 5 children all of whom survived. Neither of them could read but both could speak both Irish and English. Both were Roman Catholic and Born in Co. Galway and Pat is listed as being a farmer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house, calf house and a piggery. Pat Connor was the landholder.

 

 

1901 Censusfor Crocknaraw

Overview of Crocknaraw in 1901.

There were 8 buildings in Crocknaraw in 1901 but only 1 was inhabited, that being house 1 which was recorded as a private dwelling. The other 7 uninhabited buildings were recorded as public buildings. There is a note on the house and building return form that states “ Note – No. 2 to 8 inclusive are houses newly built by G. D. board but not yet tenanted” So, the landholder at this time for all the houses was the G. district board for Ireland. All houses were constructed of Stone, brick or concrete walls and slate, iron or tiled roofs. House 1 was a 1stclass dwelling with 4 rooms and 8 windows in the front. The other 7 houses had 2 rooms and 2 windows and were classed as 2ndclass dwellings. There was just the 1 person living in Crocknaraw ath that time, a male.

 

Cobham

The sole occupant of Crocknaraw was Robert (50). He could read and write, was a Roman Catholic and was born in England. His occupation is listed as a basket maker. The house was a 1stclass, 4 roomed house with a stable, turf house and store. The landholder was the G. district board for Ireland.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Crocknaraw

According to the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Robert Graham owned the landing this area and leased tenements to Thomas C. Butler and the Rev. John Lynch. Thomas C. Butler leased 2 plots of land, the first being of 437 Acres 2 Roods and 1 perch that contained a house and offices. The second plot was of 360 Acres, 1 Rood and 10 Perches of land only. He paid an annual rate of £47 for the first plot of land and £15 for the buildings on that plot and he paid £5 for the second plot. Thomas C. Butler then leased a house to Timothy Lydon for 5s annually. The Rev. John Lynch leased 1 Acre and 10 Perches from Robert Graham at an annual rate of 5s. Robert Graham himself kept 68 Acres and 2 Roods of land at an annual ratable valuation of 15s. There was also  10 Acres,3 Roods and 15 Perches of water.

 

 

1670 Down Survey for Crocknaraw

The 1670 Down Survey had a number of names for this area, these were Keilemore, Glancarbdemore, Gortnefunshine, Rossynelee and Shanaharaghane. In 1641 the owner was Edmund O’Flaharty who was a Catholic and in 1670 the owner was the Catholic James Darcy.

 

 

 

Derrylahan

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Derrylahan

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       67.55 acres / 67 acres, 2 roods, 7 perches

 

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

Logainm for Derrylahan

NUI Galway Digital Collections forDerrylahan

Map

Galway Library for Derrylahan

 

1911 Census for Derrylahan

Overview of Derrylahan in 1911.

The 1911 census lists only 1 house in Derrylahan. It was constructed of stone, brick orconcrte walls and slate, iron or tiled roof. It was a 2ndclass dwelling with 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front. It was classified as a private dwelling and had a cow house and calf house. There were 6 people living in the townland, 3 male and 3 female. Const. John Hickey was the enumerator.

 

McDonnell family                              (additional surnames: Burke)

The only family in Derrylahan was that of the McDonnell family. Head of the family was Michael (45) and his wife Mary (40) who had been married for 16 years and had had 7 children but only 4 had survived. 3 of those children lived with them at the time and they were John (14), Mary (10) and Ellen (4). Also living there was Michael’s brother-in-law Martin Burke (35). Michael Mary (40) and Martin could speak both Irish and English, nothing was listed for the others in that column[xviii]. Michael, John, Mary (10) and Martin could read and write and the other 2 could not read. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael was a shepherd, Martin was a agricultural labourer and John and Mary (10) were scholars. Their house was a 2ndclass dwelling with 2 rooms and they also had a cow house and calf house. The landholder was Francis L. Tullock.

 

1901 Census forDerrylahan

Overview of Derrylahan in 1901.

Only 1 house was built in Derrylahan in 1901 and was recorded as a lodging house. It had stone, brick or concrete for walls and slate, iron or tiles for roofing. It was a 3rdclass dwelling with 1 room and 2 windows. There were only 2 males living there at that time. Const. Edward Robison was the enumerator.

 

McDonnell Family

The McDonnell family consisted of 2 brothers with James (26) being the head of the family and his brother Festus (20). Both had Irish and English language but only Festus could read and write. Both were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. James was a herdsman and Festus an assistant herdsman. The house was a 3rdclass, 1 roomed house. The landholder was K. A. L. Tullock of Shanboolard.

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Derrylahan

Honor (or Norah) Healy– Application No. C20 6209. This application was received on 26/05/1920. Honor (or Norah) Healey (c 70 yrs). Honor’s address was given as Mrs Honor Walsh, Keelkyle, Letterfrack, Co. Galway. Her parents are given as John and Nellie Healey The search was certified on 31/05/1920 and a copy dispatched to applicant on 01/06/1920

 

Griffith’s Valuation(1847-1864) for Derrylahan

According to the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Robert Graham owned the land and leased an area of land of 67 Acres, 2 Roods and 5 Perches to Thomas Y. Prior on which there was a steward’s house and Offices. He paid £25 for the land and £3 for the buildings annually.

 

1670 Down Survey for Derrylahan

The name for this area in 1670 Down Survey was Derrileahane. The 1641 owner was Feogh McShane Bourke, a Catholic, while the owner in 1670 was Peter Ayleward a Protestant. There were 354 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 36 plantation acres of profitable land and 36 plantation acres forfeited.

 

Dooneen

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Dooneen

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       29.10 acres / 29 acres, 0 roods, 16 perches

 

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

1911 Census for Dooneen  (no records)

1901 Census for Dooneen  (no records)

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Dooneen  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Dooneen

Logainm for Dooneen

NUI Galway Digital Collections forDooneen

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Dooneen

The Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1964) records that Thomas Y. Prior leased 16 Acres, 2 Roods and 23 Perches of land from Robert Graham for which he paid an annual ratable valuation of £8.

 

 

1670 Down Survey for Dooneen

The 1670 Down Survey names for this area were Keilemore, Glancarbdemore, Gortnefunshine, Rossynelee, Shanaharaghane. The 1641 owner was Edmund O’Flaharty, a Catholic and the 1670 owner was James Darcy, also a Catholic.  There were 2409 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 214 plantation acres of profitable land and 214 plantation acres were forfeited.

 

 

Freaghillaun South

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Freaghillaun South

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       79.39 acres / 79 acres, 1 rood, 22 perches

 

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

Logainm for Freaghillaun South

NUI Galway Digital Collections forFreaghillaun South

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Freaghillaun South (no records)

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Freaghillaun South  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Freaghillaun South  (no records)

 

 

1911 Census for Freaghillaun South

Overview of Freaghillaun South in 1911.

There was only 1 house on Freaghillaun South Island in 1911. It was constructed of Stone, brick or concrete walls and had thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing. It is recorded as a private dwelling and was a 2ndclass house. There was a cow house, calf house and barn as well. There was a total of 5 people, 4 male and 1 female. John Hickey was the enumerator.

 

Murphy family                                   (additional surnames: McDonnell)

The head of the Murphy family was John (66) and his wife Bridget (60) who had been married for 39 years and had had 9 children of which 8 had survived. 2 of their sons lived with them, they were Gregory (25) and Peter (19) and, also in the house at that time was a servant Joseph McDonnell (22). Gregory, Peter and Joseph could read and write but John and Bridget could not read. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John was a farmer with Gregory and Peter being farmer’s sons and Joseph was a farm servant. The house they shared was a 2ndclass, 2 roomed house with a cow house, calf house and barn. The landholder was John Murphy.

 

1901 Census for Freaghillaun South

Overview of Freaghillaun South in 1901.

There was only the one house on Freaghillaun South in the 1901 census. It was built of staone, brick or concrete walls and thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. It was a 3rdclass dwelling with 2 rooms and 2 windows and was recorded as a private dwelling. There were a total of 8 people, 6 male and 2 female. The enumerator was Const. Edward Robinson.

 

Cloonan Family                                  (additional surnames: Murphy)

The head of the Cloonan family was the widower Martin (77). Living with him was his son-in-law John Murphy (55), his daughter Bridget Murphy (48) and his grandchildren John Murphy (24), Margaret Murphy (19) Gregory Murphy (15), Thomas Murphy (10) and Peter Murphy (8).  All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin, John (55), Bridget and John (24) could speak both Irish and English but nothing recorded for the rest of the family[xix]. Martin and John (55) were recorded as being farmers, John (24) was a sailor, Margaret is listed as a farmer’s daughter and Gregory, Thomas and Peter were scholars. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house and Martin Cloonan was the landholder.

 

1670 Down Survey for Freaghillaun South

The 1670 Down Survey name for this island was Finishlagh. The 1670 owner was the Catholic, Richard, Earl of Westmeath.  There were 914 plantation acres of unprofitable land.

 

Garraunbaun

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Garraunbaun

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       169.35 acres / 169 acres, 1 rood, 16 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Garraunbaun  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Garraunbaun

1670 Down Survey for Garraunbaun

Logainm for Garraunbaun

NUI Galway Digital Collections forGarraunbaun

 

1911 Census for Garraunbaun

Overview of Garraunbaun in 1911.

There were 7 houses in Garraunbaun in the 1911 census, all of which were inhabited and recorded as private dwellings. All had stone, brick or concrete walls. Houses 1 and 2 had slate, iron or tiles for roofing and the rest only had thatch, wood or other perishable material. House one was a 1stclass house, house 3 was a 3rdclass house and the rest were 2ndclass. House 1 had 6 rooms and 8 windows in the front, house 2 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, house 3 had 1 room and 1 window and all the rest had 2 rooms and 3 windows. There was a total of 26 out building that consisted of 3 stables, 2 coach houses, a harness room, 5 cow houses, 5 calf houses, 3 piggeries, 2 fowl houses, a barn, 2 turf houses and 2 sheds. There were a total of 31 people in Garraunbaun, 17 male and 14 female. The enumerator was Const. John Hickey.

 

Duane Family                         (additional surnames: Mullenand Tierney)

The head of the Duane family was Bernard Jas (70) and his wife Barbara (72). They had been married for 45 years and had had 7 children all of which survived. Their daughter Mary Theresa (44) lived with them along with Thomas Mullen (30) and Catherine Tierney (17). Bernard Jas and Barbara could speak both Irish and English and all could read and write. All were Roman Catholic and Barbara was born in Co. Mayo while all the others were born in Co. Galway. Bernard Jas was a retired farmer and Mary Theresa was a farmer’s daughter while Thomas was a coachman, domestic servant and Catherine was a house maid domestic. The house they lived in was a 6 roomed, 1stclass dwelling with a stable, 2 coach houses, a harness room, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a fowl house, a barn, a turf house and a shed. The landholder was Bernard Duane.

 

Conneely Family                    (additional surnames: O’Brien)

The Conneely family in house 2 consisted of 3 members with the head of the family being the widow Mary (98). With her in the house at that time were her daughter Catherine O’Brien and her grandson John (11). Catherine had been married for 18 years and had had 4 children all of which survived. All could speak both Irish and English but only John could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John was a scholar. They lived in a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a fowl house. The landholder was Bernard Duane.

 

McDonnell

The sole occupant of house 3 was Gregory (83), a widower. He could speak both Irish and English but could not read. He was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. His house was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a turf house. The landholder was Bernard Duane.

 

Lyden family

There were 9 members of the Lyden family in house 4. The head of the family was Thomas (54) and his wife Julia (51) who had been married for 25 years and had had 12 children of which 9 had survived. Living in the house at that time were their children Patrick (23), Kate (14), Michael (12), Joseph (10), Thomas (8), James (5) and Thomas’ mother-in-law Mary (87). Thomas 954), Julia and Patrick could speak both Irish and English but there was nothing listed for the others[xx]. With the excepyion of James and Mary they could all read and write. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Thomas (54) was a farmer and Patrick a farmer’s son. Kate, Michael, Joseph and Thomas (8) were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable, cow house, calf house and a shed. Thomas Lyden was the landholder.

 

Conneely Family

Head of the Conneely family was Joseph (55) with his wife Honer (sic) (48). They had been married for 26 years and had had 8 children but only 4 survived. 3 of their children lived with them and they were John (15), Maggie (8) and Norah (5). Joseph could speak both Irish and English while the others could speak only English and only John and Maggie could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Joseph is listed as being a farmer and John a farmer’s son. Honer was listed as home duteys (sic) and Maggie and Norah were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house and a calf house. The landholder was Joseph Conneely.

 

Keane Family                          (additional surnames: Moran)

House 6 was that of the Keane family and consisted of 5 members. Head of the family was Festus (36) and his wife Mary (37) who had been married for 5 years and had had 3 children of which 2 survived. Their 2 children lived with them and they were Patrick (1) and Festus (8mths) and also they had a boarder Mary Moran (73) also in the house at that time. Festus, Mary (37) and Mary (73) could speak both Irish and English but only Festus and Mary (37) could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Festus is recorded as being a farmer. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house, a calf house and piggery. Festus Keane was the landholder.

 

Holleran Family

The head of the Holleran family was the widow Bridget (58) who had given birth to 5 children of which 4 survived. 2 of her children lived in the house with her at that time and they were Patrick (17) and Thomas (14). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All could speak both Irish and English but only Patrick and Thomas could read and write. Bridget is listed as being a farmer and Patrick and Thomas as farmer’s sons. They shared a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable, cow house, calf house and piggery. Bridget Halleron was the landholder.

 

1901 Census for Garraunbaun

Overview of Garraunbaun in 1901

There were 10 houses in Garraunbaun in the 1901 census but only 8 were inhabited, houses 9 and 10 were not inhabited. All the houses had stone, brick or concrete walls, Houses 2 and 10 had slate, iron or tiles for roofing while the rest had thatch, wood or other perishable materials. Houses 1 to 7 were 3rdclass dwellings, 8 was a 4thclass, 9 a 2ndclass and 10 a 1stclass dwelling. Houses 1 to 4 had 1 room and 2 windows in the front, houses 5 and 7 had 1 room and 1 window, house 8 had no room and 1 window, house 6 had 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front, house 9 had 2 rooms and 3 windows and house 10 had 4 rooms and 8 windows. There were a total of  10 out buildings that comprised of 2 stables, 6 cow houses and 2 piggeries. There were a total of 45 people, 23 male and 22 female. The enumerator was Const. Edward Robinson.

 

Holleran family

Head of the Holleran family was Patrick (55) and his wife Bridget (45) and with them in the house were their children Bridget (16), John (12), Mary (11), Patrick (7) and Thomas (4). They could all speak both Irish and English with the exception of Thomas, who could only speak English. Bridget (45) and Thomas could not read but the rest of the family could both read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick is listed as a farmer, Bridget (45), as a house keeper, Bridget (16), a house assistant, John and Mary were farm assistants and Patrick and Thomas were scholars. The house they lived in was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable and a cow house. Patrick Holleran was the landholder.

 

Conneely Family                    (additional surnames: O’Brien)

House 2 was the home of the Conneely family. The head of the family was John (80) and his wife Mary (70). With them in the house at that time were their children Michael (53), Cathrien (sic) (34) and their grandchildren Jullia (sic) O’Brien (7), Mary O’Brien (4), Margaret O’Brien (2) and John O’Brien (10mths). John, Mary, Michael, Cathrien (sic) could all speak both Irish and English. Jullia (sic) and Mary O’Brien could speak only English. The only member of the family that could read and write was Jullia (sic), all the others could not read. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John(80) was a farm laibourer (sic), Mary (70) was a house keeper, Michael was a laibour (sic), Cathrien (sic) was a house assistant and Jullia (sic) was a scholar. They lived in a 1 roomed, 3rdclass house with a cow house and piggery. The landholder was John Conneely.

 

King Family

House 3 was home to the King family with John (56) as head and his wife Mary (50). Their children also lived with them and they were Martin (20), Patt (sic) (18), Tom (16), John (14) Daniel (12), Honoria (sic) (9) and Catherine (7). All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. All had both Irish and English languages and all, except John (56) and Mary could read and write. John (56) and Mary were recorded as being stewards, Martin was a carman, Patt (sic) was a rural postman, Tom and John were farm labourers and Daniel, Honoria (sic) and Catherine were scholars. The house they shared was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house. The landholder was John King.

 

Conneeely Family

House 4 was the homestead of the Conneely family which consisted of 4 members. Head of the family was Joseph (50) and his wife Honor (36) and with them in the house were their children Mary (7) and Sarah (10mths). Joseph and Honor could speak both Irish and English but only Mary could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Joseph is listed as being a farmer and Mary a scholar. They occupied a 1 room, 3rdclass dwelling with cow house. Joseph Conneely was the landholder.

 

Conneely Family

Only 2 people lived in house 5 with the widow Annie (60) being the head of the family and her son Martin (18). Annie could not read but could speak both Irish and English and Martin could speak only English but could read and write. Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Annie is recorded as a farmer’s wife and Martin a farmer’s son. They shared a 1 room, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and a piggery. Annie Conneely was the landholder.

 

Lyden Family                        (additional surnames: Moran)

The Lyden family in house 6 consisted of 11 members. Head of the family was the widow Honor (60). Living with she had her son Thomas (43) and his wife Julia (36). Also, there was a servant, Mary Moran (50) and Honor’s grandchildren William (12), Mary (11), John (9), Patrick (7), Kate (4), Michael (2) and Joseph (1mth). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Honor, Thomas, Julia and Mary Moran could speak both Irish and English but nothing is recorded for the others[xxi]. Only Thomas, Julia,William, Mary, John and Patrick could read and write.Thomas is recorded as being a farmer, Mary Moran, as a general servant and William, Mary, John and Patrick were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with a stable and cow house. Honor Lyden was the landholder.

 

Duane

The sole occupant of house 7 was Bridget (60). Bridget was a widow and could speak both Irish and English but could not read and write. She was a Roman Catholic and Born in Co. Mayo. She is recorded as being a farmer and lived in a 1 room, 3rdclass dwelling. She was also the landholder.

 

McDonnell Family

The last house in Garraunbaun was that of the McDonnell family. Head of the family was the widower Gregory (72) and living with him were 2 of his children, Bridget (17) and Martin (15). Gregory is recorded as being able to speak both Irish and English but he could not read. Bridget and Martin could read and write. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Gregory was a gardener and Martin a farm labourer. They lived in a 4thclass dwelling and the landholder was Thomas Russell.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Garraunbaun

Charles P. Archer leased 121 Acres and 27 Perches of land from Robert Graham which also included herd’s houses and office. He paid an annual ratable valuation of £44 for the land and £1 for the buildings. He then leased 2 houses, 1 each to John Joyce and Bartholomew Halloran, for 7s each. Thomas Eastwood leased 15 Acres and 30 Perches from Robert Graham and he paid £8 annually. Robert Diamond leased a house and office from Thomas Eastwood for £1. The Rev. William Flannelly leased 2 plots of land from Thomas Eastwood, the larger plot being of 14 Acres and 2 Roods that included a house and offices. The second, smaller plot was of 1 Acre, 1 Rood and 14 Perches. For the larger plot he paid £5 10s for the land and £2 for the buildings and for the smaller plot of land he paid 15s. Robert Graham leased a R. C. Chapel that had a ratable annual valuation of £8 but this was exempt from payment. Thomas P. Archer leased a house to Thomas Bell for 5s and Matthias Burke leased 2 Acres of land from Robert Graham for an annual rate of 15s. In addition there was 17 Acres, 2 Roods and 10 Perches of water.

 

 

 

Glassillaun

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Glassillaun

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       5.49 acres / 5 acres, 1 rood, 38 perches

 

 

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

1911 Census for Glassillaun  (no records)

1901 Census for Glassillaun  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Glassillaun

Logainm for Glassillaun

NUI Galway Digital Collections forGlassillaun (no records)

 

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Glassillaun

Mary Conroy– Application No. C17 8703.  Application received on 15/11/1917. Mary’s address at the time of her application was Mrs John Coyne Senr. Lettergesh East, Renvyle, Co. Galway. She gave the names of her parents a Michael and Sarah (or Sally) Conroy (Lyden). The 1851 address was Glassillaun in the civil parish of Ballinakill, the Barony of Ballynahinch in Co. Galway. To the left of that information are the names Patrick, Thomas, Anne, Bridget, Mary, Norah and Stephen. The search was returned on 19/11/1917 with a hand written note as follows:

 

Mich & Sarah not found. Found Michael and Isabella married 1842 children Patt 15 Thos 11 Nancy 7 Bridget 4 Mary 1 ½. Barth Lyden father in ? died 1847  Sheet 3

 

There are 2 hand written notes at the bottom of the form as well. The bottom right one reads:

 

If informed that a return for a father of Michael Lydon has been fd (sic) but his wife’s name not sarah (or Sally) ? Mistake Bros & sisters hold if  21/11/17.

(this note was then crossed out)

 

A further note was then added at the bottom left:

 

Note: the mother’s name is given as Isabella but the names of the children correspond to those given by you 4-12-17

 

Patrick Joyce– Application No.: C17 2922. Patrick’s application was received on 11/04/17 with an address at that time of c/o Mrs Elizabeth Flaherty, No. 18 Edward Street, South Shields, Co. Durham. Patrick’s parents were Patrick and Bridget Joyce nee Faherty, This was Bridget’s second husband as she was married first to Austin Coyne. His address in 1851 is given as Culfin, Glassillaun Co. Galway. The search return is dated 16/04/1917 with the wording “Family of Patk and Bridget Joyce not found. Found two families of Patk and Bridget Coyne see other side” Patrick was granted a pension of 2s on 17/04/1917.

 

On the other sideof this application were some hand written notes:

Sheet 5 Glassillaun

Pat                   Coyne             45        Head    married 1843

Bridget                        “                      45        wife

Pat                   “                      16        son

Mary               “                      11        dau

Kate                “                      6          “

Anne               “                      2          “

John                “                      7          son      Died 1843

Bridget            “                      2          dau      “          “

Anne               “                      2mths  “          “       1847

 

Sheet 8 Salrock

Bridget                        Cain                 40        Head    Married 1836

Martin             “                      13        son

Patk                 “                      9          “

Mary               “                      7          dau

Catherine         “                      2          “

Patk                 Cain                 40        husband          absent in America

John                “                      5          son      dies      1849

Thos                “                      1          “          “          1849

 

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Glassillaun

According to Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Alexander Thompson leased tenements to Connor Faherty, James Faherty, Martin Faherty, Michael Conroy, Charles Faherty, John Faherty, John Martin, Michael Keane, Thomas Keane, Martin Coyne, Daniel Keane, Philip Coyne, Patrick Coyne and John Gaffney. Alexander Thompson had a total of 322 Acres of land of which he kept 242 Acres 3 Roods and 25 Perches for himself at a ratable annual valuation of £14. He leased 2 sections of land jointly to Connor, James and Martin Faherty. The first section had an area of 15 Acres, 2 Roods and 35 Perches which each man had an annual rate of £1 10s. Martin Faherty also had a house on this piece of land at an annual rate of 5s. The second section of land had an area of 12 Acres, 2 Roods and 10 Perches and this land had an annual ratable valuation of £1 to each man. Connor and James also had a house and office each on this land for which they had an annual rate of 7s for Connor and 8s for James.  Michael Conroy, Charles Faherty and John Faherty jointly leased land of 13 Acres, 2 Roods and 32 Perches from Alexander at an annual valuation of £1 15s for Michael Conroy and Charles Faherty and £1 2s for John Faherty. They also had a house each and Michael Conroy had an office as well for which each had an annual rate of 5s. John Martin and Michael Keane lease an area of 10 Acres, 1 Rood and 37 Perches at an annual rate of £1 15s each John Martin also paid 8s for a house and Michael Keane paid 5s for his house. Thomas Keane leased an area of 6 Acres, 1 rood at an annual rate of £2 and he had a house at a rate of 5s. Martin Coyne leased an area of land of 15 acres, 2 roods and 2 Perches at a rate of £2 10s he also had a house at a rate of 5s. Daniel Keane and Philip Coyne jointly lease 4 Acres, 3 Roods and 27 perches from Alexander for 15s each and each had a house for the rate of 5s annually. Patrick Coyne leased just a house at an annual rate of 5s. John Gaffney also only leased a house at 15s annually.

 

 

1670 Down Survey for Glassillaun

The down survey name for Glassillaun was Ilandcrunny Island. In 1641 the owner was Sir Robert Cressey and in 1670 the owner was Cressey Taseborough and both where protestant. It had 41 plantation acres of profitable land and 41 plantation acres were forfeited.

 

 

 

Keelkyle

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Keelkyle

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       1006.76 acres / 1006 acres, 3 roods, 0 perches

 

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Keelkyle  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Keelkyle

Logainm for Keelkyle

NUI Galway Digital Collections forKeelkyle

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Keelkyle

Robert Graham owned most of the land in this area according to Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) and he leased tenements to a number of people. William Yates leased an area of land of 1 Acre and 24 Perches from Robert Graham at an annual rate of 8s. William then leased a house and office to Michael King for £1 annually. Francis J Graham owned 2 lots of land in this area. The first being an area 31 Acres on which he had a house and offices and paid £10 10s for the land and 10s for the buildings. In addition to that he also had 816 Acres, 2 Roods and 10 Perches of mountain and bog land for which he paid an annual rate of £6 10s. Patrick Heaney and John Manning jointly leased 10 Acres 2 Roods and 38 Perches of land from Robert Graham. Patrick Heaney had a house and John Manning had a house and offices on that land. Patrick paid 15s for his share of the land and 5s for the house, John paid £1 8s for his part of the land and 7s for the buildings. James Ellis leased 2 Acres of land from Robert Graham for 15s. Patrick Kilkoyne leased 12 Acres, 3 Roods and 10 Perches of land on which there were a house and office. For this he paid £2 15s for the land and 15s for the buildings. Patrick Heaney, John Manning, Patrick Kilcoyne, John Mealy, John Lyden and Thaddeus Walsh jointly leased 7 Acres an 3 Roods of land from Robert Graham at a rate of 1s each annually. John Lydon and Bartholomew Conroy leaded 11 Acres and 13 Perches of land that had houses on and paid £1 10s for the land and 5s for the buildings each. Thaddeus Walsh leased 12 Acres and 10 Perches of land and buildings from Robert Graham for £2 for the land and 10s for the buildings. John Mealy leased 12 Acres of land and a house from Robert Graham for which he paid £3 10s for the land and 10s for the house. James Lydon and Martin Coyne leased 31 Acres, 2 Roods and 11 Perches of land and buildings from Robert Graham for which James Lydon paid £2 7s for the land and 8s for the house and Martin Coyne paid £1 3s for the land and 7s for the house. Robert Graham had an area of land of 5 Acres, 1 Rood and 20 Perches of land which he paid an annual ratable valuation of 12s. Thomas Heaney leased 21 Acres, 3 Roods and 13 Perches of land from Robert Graham that included a house for which he paid £3 10s for the land and 5s for the house. Lastly, Patrick Coyne leased 30 Acres, 3 Roods and 25 Perches of land and buildings from Robaert Graham for £4 for the land and 10s for the buildings.

 

 

1670 Down Surveyfor Keelkyle

The name for this area in the 1670 Down Survey was Cossekillarie. The 1641 owner was the Catholic Edmund O’Flaharty. In 1670 the owner was Sir Thomas Meredith, a Protestant. There were 2077 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 292 plantation acres of profitable land and 293 plantation acres were forfeited.

 

 

 

1911 Census forKeelkyle

Overview of Keelkyle in 1911.

The townland of Keelkyle comprised of 3 dwellings in 1911. All 3 are recorded as being private dwellings. They were all constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls. House 1 had slate, iron or tiles for roofing and houses 2 and 3 had thatch, wood or other perishable material. House 1 was a 1stclass house with 5 rooms and 7 windows in the front. Houses 2 and 3 were 3rdclass dwellings with 2 rooms and 2 windows. There were a total of 14 out buildings consisting of 2 stables, a coach house, 3 cow houses, 2 calf houses, 2 piggeries, a fowl house, a barn, a turf house and a shed. A total of 13 people lived there, 6 male and 7 female. Const. John Hickey was the enumerator.

 

Leigh family                            (additional surnames: Longbottomand Connolly)

House 1 was the home of the Leigh family. Head of the family was Edward Leonard Holmes (65) and his wife Blanche Isabel (34) who had been married for 4 years and had had 1 child. In the house with them at that time were their son Edward ?[xxii]Patrick (3), a visitor Emily Longbottom (52) and a servant Ellen Connolly (19). Ellen is recorded as speaking Irish and all, with the exception of Edward ? Patrick could read and write. Edward ? Patrick and Ellen were born in Co. Galway with the rest being born in England. Ellen was a Roman Catholic and the rest were Church of England. Edward Leonard Holmes is recorded as a retired farmer, Emily was an artist and Ellen was a general servant domestic. The house they shared was a 1stclass, 5 roomed dwelling with a stable, coach house, cow house, calf house, piggery, fowl house, barn, turf house and a shed. Hector R. L. Graham was the landholder.

 

Joyce Family

House 2 was the Joyce household and the head of the family was the widow Margret (sic) (80) who had given birth to 9 children with 8 surviving. 2 of those children lived with her Philip (38) and Maria (36). All 3 could speak both Irish and English but only Philip could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Maria is recorded as a farmer’s daughter and Philip a farmer’s son. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and piggery. Margret Joyce was the landholder.

 

Walsh Family                          (additional surname: Daly)

The third house was home to the Walsh family. The head of the family was Peter (74) and his wife Honor (63) who had been married for 40 years and had had 10 children all surviving. 2 of those children lived with them and were John (22) and Stephen (17) and peter’s moth-in-law also lived there and she was Ellen Daly (90). All could speak both Irish and English but only John and Stephen could read and write. Peter was a farmer and John and Stephen were farmer’s sons. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable, cow house and calf house. The landholder was Peter Walsh.

 

1901 Census for Keelkyle

Overview of Keelykle in 1901.

There were 4 houses in Keelkyle according to the 1901 census. All were classified as private dwellings and all had stone, brick or concrete walls. Houses 1 and 2 had slate, iron or tiles for roofing and houses 3 and4 had thatch, wood or other perishable material. Houses 1 and 2 were 1stclass dwellings and houses 2 and 3 were 3rdclass. House 1 had 5 rooms and 7 windows in the front, house 2 had 4 rooms and 7 windows, house 3 had 2 rooms and 2 windows and house 4 had 1 room and 2 windows. There were a total of 15 out buildings, those being 2 stables, 2 coach houses, 6 cow houses, a piggery, 2 fowl houses and 2 stores. There were a total of 29 people, 16 male and 13 female. The enumerator was Const. Edward Robison.

 

Graham Family                       (additional surnames: Laird, Mannion and McDonnell)

The head of the Graham family was Francis John (67). With him in the house that time were a cook Eliza Laird (32) and 3 servants, George Laird, John Mannion (32) and Thoms (sic) McDonnell (19). John and Thoms (sic) could speak both Irish and English and the others on English. They could all read and write with the exception of John Mannion. John and Thoms (sic) were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Francis John and George were born in Co. Fermanagh and Eliza was born in Co. Tyrone, these thre were members of the Presbyterian Church. Francis John’s occupation is recorded as Lanstord D.L. (sic) Eliza was a cook domestic st (sic), George was a gardener, John a gamekeeper and Thoms a farm labourer. The house they lived in was a 5 roomed, 1stclass dwelling with a stable, coach house, 2 cow houses, a fowl house and a store. The landholder was Francis J. Graham.

 

McDonnell family

The head of the McDonnell family was the widow Mary (74). In the house with her at that time were her children Joseph (42), Josephine (40) and Barry (38), her daughter-in-law Mary (32), her grandchildren Charles Edward (6), Josephine Mary (2) and Joseph (8mths). Also in the house were 3 servants Michael Conneely (35), Mary Maninan (sic)[xxiii]and Hanoria Lydon (sic). Mary, Charles Edward, Josephine Mary and Honoria could speak only English. All the rest, with the exception 8 month old Joseph, could speak both Irish and English. Josephine Mary, Joseph and Mary could not read but all the rest were able to read and write. Joseph (42) is listed as being a staff surgeon R.N., Barry was a farmer J.P., Charles Edward was a scholar, Michael was a farm servant, Mary (36) was a domestic servant cook and Honoria was a domestic servant. All were Roman Catholic, Mary (32) was born in England, Charles Edward was born in Lamarkshire (sic)[xxiv], Josephine Mary was born in Hampshire and the rest were born in Co. Galway. The house they shared was a 4 roomed, 1stclass dwelling with a stable, coach house, cow house, fowl house and a store. The landholder was Mary McDonnell.

 

Walsh Family                          (additional surnames: McLoughlin)

The head of the Walsh family was Peter (60) and his wife Honor (50). Living with them at that time were their children Thomas (23), Annie (15), Ellen (14), John (12), Peter (8) and Steph (6) along with Peter’s mother-in-law Ellen McLoughlin (80). All except Peter (8) and Stephen could speak both Irish and English and all except Peter(60) and Ellen McLoughlin could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Peter (60) was a farmer, Thomas was a farmer’s son, Annie and Ellen (14) were farmer’s daughters and John Peter (8) and Stephen were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with 2 cow houses and a piggery. The landholder was Peter Walsh.

 

Joyce Family

The Joyce family consisted of 4 members with the head of the fanliy being Patrick (80) with his wife Margret (sic) (70). Living with them were their children Philip (30) and Maria (24). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All 4 could speak both Irish and English and Philip and Maria could read and write. Patrick is recorded as a farmer, Margret as a farmer’s wife, Philip as a farmer’s son and Maria as a farmer’s daughter. They shared a 1 roomed, 3rdclass house with cow house. Patrick Joyce was the landholder.

 

 

Knocknahaw

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Knocknahaw

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       74.51 acres / 74 acres, 2 roods, 1 perch

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Knocknahaw  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Knocknahaw

Logainm for Knocknahaw

NUI Galway Digital Collections forKnocknahaw

 

 

1911 Census for Knocknahaw

Overview of Knocknahaw in 1911.

The 1911 census for Knocknahaw lists 7 houses. All had stone, brick or concrete walls with houses 5 and 6 having slate, iron or tiles for roofing and the other houses having thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. House 5 was a 1stclass dwelling, houses 1,3,4 and 6 were 2ndclass dwellings and houses 2 and 7 were 3rdclass. House 7 had 1 room and 1 window, house 2 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, houses 1,3,4 and 6 had 2 rooms and 3 windows and house 5 had 5 rooms and 7 windows. There were a total of 19 out buildings consisting of 5 stables, a coach house, a harness room, 5 cow houses, 3 calf houses, 3 piggeries and a turf house. A total of 28 people lived there, 9 male and 19 female. The enumerator was Const. John Hickey.

 

Gannon Family

The head of the Gannon family was Michael (79) and along with his wife Bridget (80) had been married for 50 years and had had 1 child. Their son Own (sic) (30) and his wife, Michael’s daughter-in-law, Bridget (27) who had been married for a year also lived in the house with them. Michael and Bridget (80) are listed as being able to speak both Irish and English but on Bridget (27) could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael was a farmer and Own (sic) was a farmer’s son. The house they shared was a 2ndclass, 2 roomed house with a stable, cow house and piggery. Michael Gannon was the landholder.

 

Conneely family

The Conneely family consisted of 9 members with Michael (47) as the head of the family and his wife Honor (38) who had been married for 16 years and had had 7 children of which 6 survived. Sharing the house with them were their children John (10), William (8), Patrick (1), Mary (12), Ellen (6) and Sarah (4) and also Michael’s mother Mary (84). Michael, John, William and Mary (12) could speak both Irish and English, Mary (84) could only speak Irish but there was no entry for the others[xxv]. Only Michael (47), John, William and Mary (12) could read and write.  All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic.Michael (47) is recorded as being a farmer and John, William and Mary (12) were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a stable, cow house and calf house. Michael Conneely was the landholder.

 

O’Brien Family

House 3 was that of the O’Brien family with the head of the family being the widow Julia (50) who had had 5 children of which 4 survived. Living with her were her son Michael (36) and her daughter-in-law Jane (37). All had both Irish and English language and Michael and Jane could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael is recorded as being a farmer’s son. Their house was 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable, cow house, calf house and piggery. Julia was the landholder.

 

Conneely Family

House 4 was the home of the Conneely family. Head of the family was Simon (84) and his wife Margret (sic) (86) who had been married for 60 years and had had 7 children of which 6 survived.  Their daughter Margret (sic) (48) also lived with them. All spoke both Irish and English but none could read or write. All 3 were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All 3 were recorded as being farmers. The house was a2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house, calf, house and piggery. The landholder was Simon Conneely.

 

Graham Family                                   (additional surnames: Walters/Wattersand Mathews)

The head of the Graham family was Hector Robert Lushington Graham (22) and his wife Ellen Violet Mandsley (28) who had been married for only 1 year with no children. Hector’s mother, a widow who had had only 1 child, Minna (sic) (53) was also in the house at that time along with a visitor Edith Isabel Monsarrat Watters[xxvi](30). There were also 2 females that in the relationship to the head section is described as by marriage cousin. They were Elizabeth Violet Gertrude Mathews (34) and Sarah Evelyne Constance Mathews (31). All could read and write. All were Church of Ireland, Episcopalian. Hector was born in Co. Fermanagh, Ellen was born in Co. Down, Minna (sic) was born in India, Edith was born in Co. Kilkenny and Elizabeth and Sarah were born in Co. Tyrone. Hector is listed as being a land owner. Their house was a 1stclass 5 roomed dwelling with 2 stables, a coach house, a harness room, a cow house and a turf house. The landholder was Bernard Duane.

 

Laird Family

House 6 was the home of the Laird family. Head of the family was Elizabeth (41) who was married for 12 years and had had 3 children all of whom survived. In the house with her at that time was her granddaughter Mabel Minna (1). Elizabeth could read and write. Elizabeth was born in Co. Tyrone and Mabel Minna was born in Co. Galway and both were Church of Ireland, Episcopalian. The house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and the landholder was Bernard Duane.

 

King

The sole occupant of the last house was Margret (72). She spoke both Irish and English but could not read or write. She was born in Co. Galway and was Roman Catholic. Her house was a 1 roomed 3rdclass dwelling and Bernard Duane was the landholder.

 

1901 Census for Knocknahaw

Overview of Knocknahaw in 1901.

According to the 1901 census for knocknahaw there were 7 houses in the townland. All the houses were built with stone, brick or concrete walls with house 1 having slate, iron or tiles for roofing and the rest having thatch, wood or other perishable material. House 6 was classified as a lodging house while all the rest were private dwellings. House 1 was a 1stclass dwelling, house 2and 4 were 2ndclass and houses 2,5,6 and7 were 3rdclass dwellings. There were a total of 12 out buildings consisting of 2 stables, 7 cow houses and 3 piggeries. At total of 32 people lived in the townland of which 14 were male and 18 female. The enumerator was Const. Edward Robinson.

 

Duane Family                         (additional surnames: O’Malleyand Brown)

The head of the Duane family was Bernard S. (62) and his wife Barbara (60). In the house with them at that time were their 4 children May T. (29), Barbara M. (26), Mathias S. (23) and Bernard S. (21) and also a servant Mary O’Malley (18) and a fisherman Peter Brown (40).All could read and write and Peter Brown could only speak English with all the rest having both Irish and English for languages. All were Roman Catholic. Peter was born in Co. Wicklow and the rest in Co. Galway. Bernard S. (62) is listed as a farmer, Barbara, as a farmer’s wife, Mary T. and Barbara M, as farmer’s daughters, Mathias S. and Bernard S. (21), as farmer’s sons, mary O’Malley was a domestic Servant cook and Peter a fisherman. The house they shared was a 4 roomed, 1stclass dwelling with a stable and a cow house. Bernard Duane was the landholder.

 

Conneely Family

House 2 was the home of the Conneely family that consisted of 5 members. Head of the family was Simon (62) and his wife Margaret (60). Also in the house were 2 of their daughters Mary (40) and Maggie (18) along with 1 of their granddaughters Mary (20). All 5 were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All could speak both Irish and English but only Maggie and Mary (20) could read and write. Simon is recorded as a farmer, Margaret was a farmer’s wife, Mary 940) a cook domestic servant and Maggie and Mary (20) were listed as farmer’s daughters. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass house with a cow house and piggery. The landholder was Simon Conneely.

 

Connor Family                                   (additional surnames: Connolly)

The Connor family occupied house 3. The head of the family was Patrick (50) and his wife Bridget (48). Also in the house were 3 of their children Michael (23), Festus (18), Bridget (15) and their grandson Michael Connolly (5). All could speak, both, Irish and English but only Michael, Festus and Bridget (15) could read and write.  All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick was a farmer and Bridget (48) a farmer’s wife. The 2 Michaels and Festus were listed as farmer’s sons and Bridget (15) a farmer’s daughter. Their house was a 1 roomed 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and piggery. Patrick Connor was the landholder.

 

O’Brien Family

The head of the O’Brien family was the widow Julia (84). In the house with her at that time were her children Margaret (34) and Michael (32). All 3 could speak Irish and English but only Michael could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Julia was a farmer, Margaret, a farmer’s daughter and Michael a farmer’s son. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable and cow house. Julia was the landholder.

 

Gannon family

House 5 was the Gannon household and the head of the family was Michael (64) and his wife Bridget (64). Also in the house at that time was there son Owen (24). They could all speak Irish and English but none of them could read or write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael is listed as a farmer and Owen a fisherman. Their house was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and piggery. Michael was the landholder.

 

King

The sole occupant of house 6 was Margaret (50). She could speak Irish and English but could not read or write. She was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway She was listed as a farmer servant. Her house was a 1 roomed 3rdclass dwelling. Thomas Russell was the landholder.

 

Conneely Family                                (additional surname: Heanue)

The last house in Knocknahaw was that of the Conneely family. Head of the family was William (94) and his wife Mary (70). In the house at that time were his son Michael (34), daughter-in-law Nora (25), a niece Mary (2) and a visitor, Bridget Heanue (60). Mary (2) could speak only English but the rest had both Irish and English languages. Only Michael could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. William was a farmer with Mary (70) a farmer’s wife, Michael, a farmer’s son and Nora and Mary were listed as farmer’s daughters. The house was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with 2 cow houses. William Conneely was the landholder.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Knocknahaw

In the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) it states that Edward Whitwell leased 17 Acres, 2 Roods and 26 Perches of land and buildings from Charles P. Archer for £8 10s for the land and £5 10s for the buildings. Charles P. Archer in turn leased 54 Acres, 1 Rood and 30 Perches from Robert Graham for £20 10s for the land and 10s for a herd’s house.

 

 

1670 Down Survey for Knocknahaw

According to the 1670 Down Survey the 1641 owner of this area was Edmund O’Flaharty, a Catholic and the 1670 owner was Richard, Earl of Westmeath, also a Catholic.

 

 

 

Letterfrack

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Letterfrack

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       1231.92 acres / 1231 acres, 3 roods, 26 perches

 

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

Map

Galway Library for Letterfrack

Logainm for Letterfrack

NUI Galway Digital Collections forLetterfrack

 

1911 Census forLetterfrack

Overview of Letterfrack in 1911

According to the census of 1911, there were 28 buildings in Letterfrack. House 2 was an industrial school, houses 3, 4 and 5 were public houses, house 27 was a basket factory and 28 was the R.I.C. barracks. Houses 26 and 27 were not occupied. All buildings were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and buildings 5, 15, 17, 22, 23 and 24 had thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing while all the other buildings had slate, iron or tiled roofs. Buildings 1, 2, 18, 19, 20, 25 and 28 were 1stclass dwellings, houses 5, 15, 17 and 21 were 3rdclass buildings and the rest were 2ndclass. The windows and rooms in the houses are as follows:

 

House 21 had 2 rooms and 1 window

Houses 9, 15, 16, and 17 had 2 rooms and 2 windows

Houses 6, 7, 10, 11, 12, 22 and 23 had 2 rooms and 3 windows

House 14 had 3 rooms and 2 windows

House 5 had 3 rooms and 3 windows

House 4 had 3 rooms and 5 windows

Houses 3 and 8 had 4 rooms and 5 windows

House 19 had 4 rooms and 6windows

Houses 18 and 25 had 4 rooms and 7 windows

House 28 had 5 rooms and 5 windows

House 20 had 6 rooms and 9 windows

House 1 had 6 rooms and 13 windows

House 2 had 6 rooms and 23 windows.

 

There were a total of 88 out buildings consisting of 11 stables, 9 coach houses, a harness room, 13 cow houses, 2 calf houses 9 piggeries, 8 fowl houses, a boiling house, a barn, 5 turf houses, 2 potato houses, 8 workshops, 5 sheds, 6 stores, a forge, a laundry, a playhouse, a board room, an office, a meat room and an infirmary. There were a total of 224 people, 191 male and 33 female. The enumerator was Const. Thomas Casey.

 

House 1

House 1 was not a family home but a house for teachers, most likely for the neighboring industrial school. The teachers living there were the manager John F. Scannell (66) assistants Michael Ryan (67), James martin (50), John Hayes (37) William Cloonan (28), John Riordan (38), Daniel Moriarty (38), William Fennessy (29), Thomas Griffin (39), John Lavelle (22) and John Kelly (18). There were also two borders in the house at that time Christopher Byrne (26) and Thomas Gilleran (16). James Martin, Daniel Moriarty, Thomas Griffin, John Lavelle, John Kelly and Thomas Gilleran could speak Irish and English but there is no entry for the others[xxvii]. All the house hold could read and write. All were Roman Catholic.  John F. Scannell and John Riordan were born in Co. Cork, Michael Ryan and Thomas Griffin were born in Co. Limerick. James Martin and Christopher Byrne were born in Dublin City, John Hayes, William Fennessy and John Lavelle were born in Co. Tipperary. William Cloonan and Thomas Gilleran were born in Co. Galway, Daniel Moriarty was born in Co. Kerry and John Kelly was born in Co. Roscommon. Christopher Byrne is listed as a painter and Thomas Gilleran was a baker, all the rest were teachers. They lived in a 6 roomed, 1stclass dwelling. The landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Letterfrack Industrial School 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

The second building in Letterfrack was the industrial school. It was a boarding school for boys and hence there were 153 residents.

The following boys were all 15 years old:

Patrick Farrell, Martin Morrin, Dennis Muldoon, Michael Moore, Francis Cusack, Joseph Shaughnessy, William Kelly, Patrick Mangan, Martin Linsky, Michael Linsky, John Gill, Martin Craughwell, Stephen Monaghan, William Rankins, John Collins, Michael McDermot, Martin Gilleran, Martin Sweeny, John Folan, Hubert Hogan, Robert Mulholland, John Keegan, James Cremer, Thomas Kenny, Cornelius Breen, William Darcy and Patrick Rielly

 

All these boys were Roman Catholic. Patrick Farrell, Martin Morrin, Dennis Muldoon, Michael Moore, Francis Cusack, Joseph Shaughnessy, William Kelly, Patrick Mangan, Martin Linsky, Michael Linsky and John Gill were born in Co. Mayo. Martin Craughwell, Stephen Monaghan, William Rankins, John Collins, Michael McDermot, Martin Gilleran, Martin Sweeny and John Folan were born in Co. Galway. Hubert Hogan, Robert Mulholland, John Keegan, James Cremer, Thomas Kenny and Cornelius Breen were born in Dublin City. William Darcy and Patrick Rielly were born in Co. Cavan. All of them could read and write and were listed as pupils.

 

These boys were all 14 years old:

John Farrell, Edward Moore, James McHugh, Martin Conlan, Patrick Murphy, Martin Tarmey, John Rowland, Matthias Conneally (sic), Patrick McGrath, John Monaghan, Patrick Kilderry, Bernard Potter, Michael Heraghty, Michael Geary, Stephen Browne, Francis Rielly, Thomas Brazil, Francis Dornan, William Cullinane, William Ryan, John J. Byrne, John Peyton, Michael Connolly and Cyril Mulvanny.

 

All these boys were Roman Catholic. John Farrell, Edward Moore, James McHugh, Martin Conlan, Patrick Murphy and Martin Tarmey were born in Co. Mayo. John Rowland, Matthias Conneally (sic), Patrick McGrath, John Monaghan, Patrick Kilderry, Bernard Potter, Michael Heraghty, Michael Geary and Stephen Browne were born in Co. Galway. Francis Rielly, Thomas Brazil, Francis Dornan, William Cullinane and William Ryan were born in Dublin City. John J. Byrne was born in Co. Roscommon. John Peyton and Michael Connolly wee born in Co. Sligo and Cyril Mulvanny was born in Co. Westmeath. All these boys could read and write and were listed as pupils.

 

The follow boys were all 13 years old in 1911:

Robert Wallace, John Mchugh, Michael Dunleavy, Bartley Fury, Jomes Jennings, Michael Whelan, Patrick Fahy, Bryan Toole (sic), John Madden, William  O’Driscoll, Thomas Burke, Richard Gileece, Thomas King, John Grealish, John O’Sullivan, Leo Keegan, Joseph Cahill, Edward Cremer, James Graves, John Byrne, John Rodgers and William Connell.

 

All the 13 year olds were Roman Catholic. Robert Wallace, John Mchugh and Michael Dunleavy were born in Co. Mayo. Bartley Fury, Jomes Jennings, Michael Whelan, Patrick Fahy, Bryan Toole (sic), John Madden, William O’Driscoll, Thomas Burke, Richard Gileece, Thomas King and John Grealish were born in Co. Galway. John O’Sullivan was born in Co. Dublin. Leo Keegan, Joseph Cahill, Edward Cremer, James Graves and John Byrne were born in Dublin City and John Rodgers and William Connell were born in Co. Roscommon. All could read and write and were listed as pupils.

 

The following boys were 12 years old:

Thomas Morley, Stephen Grimes, John Doyle, Bernard O’Rorke (sic), Michael Nee, Patrick Hogan, Edward Gilleran, Patrick Gore, Hugh McCann, Laurence Carroll, John Russell, James Byrne, Edward Gordon, Joseph O’Hara, William Robson, Peter Sullivan, John Shields, Philip Bradshaw and Thomas Lowry.

All these boys were Roman Catholic. Thomas Morley was born in Co. Mayo. Stephen Grimes, John Doyle, Bernard O’Rorke (sic), Michael Nee, Patrick Hogan, Edward Gilleran and Patrick Gore were born in Co. Galway. Hugh McCann and Laurence Carroll were born in Co. Dublin. John Russell and James Byrne were born in Dublin City. Edward Gordon was born in Co. Sligo and Joseph O’Hara was born in Co. Tyrone. William Robson was born in Belfast City and Peter Sullivan and John Shields were born in Co. Louth. Philip Bradshaw was born in Co Tipperary and Thomas Lowry was born in Co. Kildare. All were able to read and write and were listed as pupils.

These boys were all 11 years old:

John Molloy, Thomas Kelly, Patrick Cooney, Vincent Gogarty (sic), Dominic Tarmey, John Fleming, Thomas Connolly, John Heraghty, Martin Elwood, Thomas Toole (sic), Patrick Geary, Walter Butler, Charles Redmond, James Rankins, William Burke, Walter Keegan, James Cahill, Thomas McCann, Joseph Harper, Hugh Gallagher, Peter Hand and William Higgins.

 

All these boys were Roman Catholic. John Molloy, Thomas Kelly, Patrick Cooney, Vincent Gogarty (sic), Dominic Tarmey and John Fleming were born in Co. Mayo. Thomas Connolly, John Heraghty, Martin Elwood, Thomas Toole (sic), Patrick Geary, Walter Butler, Charles Redmond, James Rankins and William Burke were born in Co. Galway. Walter Keegan, James Cahill and Thomas McCann were born in Dublin City. Joseph Harper was born in Co. Roscommon and Hugh Gallagher was born in Co. Tyrone. Peter Hand was born in Co. Monaghan and William Higgins was born in Belfast City. All could read and write and were listed as pupils.

 

The 10 year old boys were:

John Cooney, Patrick Gogarty (sic), Anthony Burke, James Devers, Michael Coghlan, John Duggan, William O’Sullivan, Jeremiah Byrne, John Fox, Michael Mullen, Michael Meehan, Francis Moran, Patrick Griffith, Peter Reyonalds (sic), John Bradshaw and John Brien (sic).

 

All the 10 year old boys were Roman Catholic. John Cooney, Patrick Gogarty (sic), Anthony Burke and James Devers were born in Co. Mayo. Michael Coghlan and John Duggan were born in Co. Galway. William O’Sullivan were born in Co. Dublin and Jeremiah Byrne was born in Dublin City. John Fox was born in Co. Cavan and Michael Mullen was born in Co. Roscommon. Francis Moran was born in Co. Leitrm, Michael Meehan was born in Co. Kilkenny and Patrick Griffith, Peter Reyonalds (sic) were born in Co. Louth. John Bradshaw was born in Co Tipperary  and John Brien (sic) was born in Co. Westmeath. All could read and write and were listed as pupils.

 

The following were 9 year old boys

Thomas Geary, Thomas Elwood, Owen McDonagh, Patrick Shaughnessy, Cormac Cullinane, William Fox and Patrick Looney.

 

All these boys were Roman Catholic. Thomas Geary, Thomas Elwood, Owen McDonagh and Patrick Shaughnessy were born in Co. Galway. Cormac Cullinane was born in Dublin City, William Fox was born in Co. Cavan and Patrick Looney was born in Co. Kildare. All could read and write and were listed as pupils.

 

The 8 year old boys were:

John O’Brien, Patrick Corcoran, James Cooke, Michael Caffery, John McCormack, John Shaw, Patrick Shaw, Alfred Renick, John Burns,

 

All the 8 year olds were Roman Catholic. John O’Brien was born in Co. Mayo and Patrick Corcoran, James Cooke and Michael Caffery were born in Co. Galway. John Shaw and Patrick Shaw were born in Dublin City. Alfred Renick was born in Co. Sligo and John Burns was born in Co. Wicklow. All could read and write and were listed as pupils.

 

The 7 year old boys were:

Patrick Duggan, Patrick Fox, Timothy Mullen and George Renick.

 

These boys were all Roman Catholic. Patrick Duggan was born in Co. Galway, Patrick Fox was born in Co. Cavan, Timothy Mullen was born in Co. Roscomman and George Renick was born in Co. Sligo. All could read and write and were listed as pupils.

 

The only two 6 year old boys were:

Thomas Heanne and Daniel Kelly.

 

Both Thomas and Daniel were Roman Catholic. Thomas was born in Co. Galway and Daniel was born in Co. Sligo. Both could read and write and were listed as pupils.

 

The industrial school building was a 1stclass, 6 roomed building with a stable, coach house, harness room, 2 cow houses, 2 calf houses, 4 piggeries, a fowl house, a boiling house, a barn, a turf house, a potato house, 8 workshops, 5 sheds, 3 stores, a forge, a laundry, a play hall, a boardroom, a meat house and an infirmary. The landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Coyne Family                         (additional surnames; Fahertyand Maley)

 House 3 in Letterfrack was that of the Coyne family. Head of the family was John J. (37) and his wife Kathleen (28) who had been married for 4 years and had had 4 children of which 3 had survived. The 3 surviving daughters lived with them and they were Mary (2), Margaret (1) and Isabel (3mths). Also in the house with them at that time were 2 domestic servants Annie Faherty (15) and Annie Maley (15). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. The 3 children Mary, Margaret and Isabel could not read but the others could read and write. John J. is listed as speaking both Irish an English. John J. was a wine and spirit merchant and the 2 Annie’s were domestic servants. The house they shared was a 4 roomed, 2ndclass public house with a stable, coach house, piggery and fowl house. The landholder was John J. Coyne.

 

King Family

The King family in house 4 consisted of 2 sisters. Head of the family was Bridget (26) and with her in the house was Julia (19). Both spoke Irish and English and both could read and write. Both were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. There was no occupation entered for them on this census return. The house they shared was a 3 roomed, 2ndclass public house with 2 stables, a coach house, a cow house, a piggery and a store. The landholder was Nellie Walsh.

 

Mullen Family                                    (additional surnames: Lydan (sic), Coyne, O’Neill and Mannion)

House 5 was that of the Mullen family. Head of the family was the widower Michael (56). Five of his children lived there with him and they were May (16), Bridget (15), Martin (14), Patrick (12) and Michael (10). Also in the house were 2 servants Bridget Lydan (sic) (25) and John Coyne (18). There were also 2 relatives in the house at that time Christine A. O’Neill (25) and Ellen Mannion (21). Michael (56), Bridget Lydan, John Coyne, Christine A. O’Neill and Ellen Mannion could all speak both Irish and English but there was no entry for the others[xxviii]. All could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway with Christine A. and Ellen listed as being Roman Catholic and the rest being in the Roman Catholic Church of Rome. Michael (56) is listed as a spirit grocer shop keeper, Bridget Lydan was a general domestic servant, John Coyne is listed as a car driver etc. and Martin, Patrick and Michael (10) were scholars. The house they shared was a 3 roomed, 3rdclass public house with a stable, a coach house, cow house, piggery and a store. The landholder was Michael Mullen.

 

O’Flynn Family

The head of the O’Flynn family was James (34) and his wife Annie (29) who had been married for 10 years and had had 5 children all of which survived. Four of those children were in the house at that time and they were Mary (9), Annie (5), James (2) and Gretta (6mths). James (34) was born in Co. Clare, Annie (28) was born in Co. Tipperary and the 4 children were born in Co. Galway. All were Roman Catholic. James (34), Annie (28) and Mary could read and write but the other younger children could not read. James (34) is recorded as being a tailor with Mary and Annie (5) being scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2 class dwelling. The landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Coyne Family

There were only residents in house 7 and the head was the widow Mary (39) who had been married for 17 years and had had 2 children, both of which survived. Her son Stephen (14) lived in the house with her. They were both Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Mary could speak both Irish and English. Mary was a domestic servant and Stephen was a scholar. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a fowl house. The Christian Brothers were the landholders.

 

Joyce Family

The Joyce family consisted of 9 members. The head of the family was John (68) and his wife Mary (54) who had been married for 22 years and they’d had 9 children all of whom survived. Seven of their children lived with them at that time and they were Patrick (20), Stephen (17), Brigid (sic) (16), Margaret (14), Catherine (12), Ellen (10) and Elizabeth (7). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All could speak both Irish and English and could read and write. John and Patrick were Agricultural Labourers while Margaret, Catherine, Ellen and Elizabeth were scholars. The house they lived in was a 4 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house. The landholder was John Joyce.

 

Flanagan Family

House 9 was that of the Flanagan family. The head of the family was William (42) who had been married to his wife Johanna (32) for 15 years and they’d had 8 children all of which had survived. Those 8 children were living with them art that time and they were Mary (13), William (12), Sarah (11), Patrick (9), Daniel (7), Thomas (5), Joseph (3) and John (2). All were Roman Catholic and William was listed as being born in Co. Galway, although nothing was entered for the others. Only Thomas, Joseph and John could not read, all the others could both read and write. William (42) was recorded as a shoemaker and Mary, William (12), Sarah, Patrick and Daniel were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling. The landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Unsworth Family

There were only 2 occupants of house 10 in Letterfrack in 1911. Head of the family was the widow Catherine (67) who had been married for 30 years and had had 2 children, both of which had survived. One of her daughters Katie (23) lived with her. Catherine could speak both Irish and English while Katie could only speak English. Katie could read and write but Catherine could only read. Both were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Katie was recorded as being a dressmaker. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and the landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Connolly Family

The head of the Connolly family in house 11 was Peter (37) along with his wife Anne (40) who had been married for 18 years and they’d had 8 children of which 7 survived. Five of their children lived with them at that time and they were Patrick (14), Bridget (11), Annie (9), Michael Joseph (7) and Julia (5). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Peter and Anne could speak both Irish and English. Michael Joseph and Julia could read and the other members of the family could read and write. Peter was recorded as being a carpenter and all the children were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and the landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Moran Family

The head of the Moran family was Peter (45) and his wife Bridget (30) who had been married for 11 years and had had 6 children of which 5 survived. Those 5 children lived with them and were John (8), Annie (7), Julia (6), Bridgid (5) and Norah (2). Peter and Bridget were born in Co. Mayo and all the children were born in Co. Galway and all were Roman Catholic. Norah could not read, Bridgid could read and the rest could read and write. Peter was a blacksmith and John, Annie, Julia and Bridgid were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and the landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Faherty Family

Head of the Faherty family in house 13 was Martin (57) and his wife Mary (40). They had been married for 19 years and had had 9 children of which 7 survived. Six of those children, Martin (14), Patrick (12), Annie (10), Peter (8), Julia (5) and Elizabeth (2) also lived with them. Also in the house at that time was Martin’s sister-in-law Honoria (35). Martin (57), Mary and Honoria could speak both Irish and English although nothing was entered for the others. Julia and Elizabeth could not read, Peter could read and the rest of the family could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin (57) was a farmer and Martin (14) was recorded as a farmer’s son. Patrick, Annie, Peter and Julia were scholars. The house they lived in was a 3 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable, coach house and a cow house. The landholder was Martin Faherty.

 

Browne                                   (additional surnames: Fox)

There were only 2 occupants in house 14 in 1911. William Browne (34) and Annie Fox (40). Both were Roman Catholic, William was born in Co. Mayo and Annie was born in Co. Donegal. William could speak both Irish and English and Annie only spoke English. William could read and write but Annie could only read. William was a R. C. clergyman while Annie was a cook domestic servant. Annie was married and had been for 22 years and had had 5 children of which 4 survived. The house was a 3 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable and a coach house. The landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Aspell Family

The head of the Aspell family was Thomas (34). He had been married to his wife Winifred (33) for 11 years in which time they had had 7 children, 6 of which had survived. Those 6 children lived with them and were Ellen (10), Stephen (9), Joseph (7), James (5), Christina (4) and Thomas (2). James, Christina and Thomas could not read but the rest of the family could read and write. Thomas could speak both Irish and English but there is nothing entered for the rest of the family so that may mean they spoke only English. Winifred was born in England and the rest of the family were born in Co. Galway. All were Roman Catholic. Thomas is listed as being a house painter and Ellen, Stephen and Joseph were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass building with a cow house. Thomas Aspell was the landholder.

 

Tuite Family

There were only 2 occupants of house 16 in 1911. They were husband and wife Edward (30) and Teresa (29). Both were Roman Catholic and could read and write. Both were born in Co. Westmeath. Edward was a shepherd. They lived in a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a fowl house. The landholders were the Christian Brothers.

Mannion Family

There were 2 occupants of house 17, they were father and daughter Martin (56), who was a widower, and Mary A. (19). Both were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Martin could speak both Irish and English and could read while Mary A. spoke English and could read and write. Martin is listed as being a farmer. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a piggery and a fowl house. Martin was the landholder.

 

McNab Family

House 18 was leased to 4 families. The McNab family was the first with the head of that family being Michael John (43) with his wife Catherine (32) who had been married for 1 year. Their son Thomas Hilliard (8) also lived with them. Michael John was listed as speaking Irish and English and all three could read and write. Michael John was born in Co. Mayo, Catherine was born in Co. Cork and Thomas Hilliard was born in Co. Tipperary. All were Roman Catholic. Michael John is listed as being an inspector of fisheries and Thomas Hilliard was a scholar. The house they shared with the other 3 families was a 4 roomed, 1stclass dwelling and the landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Mongan

Mary (74) was the only occupant of the second room in house 18. She was a widow who had been married for 42 years and had had 6 children of which 4 survived. She spoke both Irish and English but could not read. She was a Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. The house she shared with the other 3 families was a 4 roomed, 1stclass dwelling and the landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Kenny Family

The third family in house 18 was the Kenny family. The head of the family was the widow Mary (62) who had been married for 33 years and had had 4 children of which 3 survived. Living with her was her son James (29). Mary could speak both Irish and English and could read while James could read and write. Both were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Mary is recorded as being a cook domestic servant and James was a general servant. The house they shared with the other 3 families was a 4 roomed, 1stclass dwelling and the landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Cranston

The sole occupant of the 4throom in house 18 was Mary (78) who was a widow and was married for 44 years and had had 4 children of which only 1 survived. She could read and could speak both Irish and English. She was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway. The house she shared with the other 3 families was a 4 roomed, 1stclass dwelling and the landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

McAndrew                             (additional surnames: Gibbonsand Coyne)

House 19 was occupied by Bartholomew (69) and 2 servants, Margaret Gibbons (40) and Mark Coyne (19). Bartholomew and Margaret could speak both Irish and English and Mark only had English. All 3 could read and write. All 3 were Roman Catholic and Bartholomew and Margaret were born in Co. Mayo with Mark being born in Co. Galway. Bartholomew was listed as a parish priest and canon and both Margaret and Mark were domestic servants. The house they shared was a 4 roomed, 1stclass dwelling with a stable, cow house and a fowl house. The Rev. B. McAndrew was the landholder.

 

Henry                          (additional surnames: Murray, Joyce andDoran)

Florence Vaughan Henry (40) was the head of the household in house 20. In the house with her at that time were Lena Murray (58), Mary Kate Joyce (21), Teresa Doran (53) and Ellen Doran (15). Teresa Doran was married, and had been for 30 years and had had 8 children of which 7 survived. All of them could read and write. Florence Vaughan was born in London and was a member of the Church of England. The others were Roman Catholic with Len being born in Kent, Mary Kate was born in Co. Galway, Teresa was born in Stratford-on-Avon and Ellen was born in Leamington. Lena was a recorded as a being a lady’s maid, Mary Kate and Ellen were domestic servants and Teresa was a cook. The house they shared was a 6 roomed, 1stclass dwelling with a stable 2, coach houses, a cow house, a turf house and a store. Florence Henry was the landholder.

 

Connolly

The sole occupant of house 21 was Michael (55). He could read and was able to speak both Irish and English. He was a Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway and was a general servant. His house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Florence Henry was the landholder.

 

Joyce Family

House 22 in Letterfrack in the 1911 census was that of the Joyce family. Head of the family was Michael (66) and his wife Ellen (64) who had been married for 33 years and they’d had 8 children, all of whom had survived. Four of their children lived with them at that time and they were Mary (28), Walter (27), Eliza (19) and Alice (14). Michael, Ellen, Mary and Walter could speak both Irish and English and all the family living there could read and write.  All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael is listed as being a mason, Walter, a farmer’s son and Eliza a post office assistant. The house that they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass house with a cow house, piggery, fowl house, turf house and a potato house. Michael Joyce was the landholder.

 

Cassidy Family                                   (additional surnames: Gibbons)

Head of the Cassidy family in house 23 was John (73) and his wife Catherine (72) who had been married for 46 years and had had 1 child, although the census says that there were no living children. Living in the house with them were their 2 nieces Catherine Agnes Gibbons (23) and Mary Elizabeth Gibbons (16). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All 4 of them could speak both Irish and English and, with the exception of John who could only read, all could both read and write. John is recorded as being a farmer stone mason. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house. John Cassidy was the landholder.

 

Joyce

There was only 1 occupant of house 24 and that was Mary (60). She was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway. Mary could read and write and could speak both Irish and English. The house she lived in was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house. Mary was the landholder.

 

Nelly Family                           (additional surnames: Kennyand Lyden)

Head of the family in house 25 was the widow Anne Teresa (71) who had been married for 41 years and had had 1 daughter who had survived. Living in the house with her was her daughter Mary Elizabeth Kenny (40) who was also a widow who had been married for 16 years and had had 3 children of which 2 survived. Those 2 children, Anne Teresa’s grandchildren, lived in the house as well and they where John Francis Kenny (15) and Mary Teresa Kenny (13). In addition they also had a servant Patrick Lyden (60) living in the house as well. Mary Teresa and Patrick could speak both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others that may indicate that they spoke only English. Patrick could not read but the others in the house could read and write. All were Roman Catholic. Anne Teresa was born in England, Mary Elizabeth was born in America, John Francis and Patrick were born in Co. Galway and Mary Teresa was born in Co. Mayo. John Francis and Mary Teresa were listed as being scholars and Patrick was a farm servant. The house they shared was a 4 roomed, 1stclass dwelling with a stable, a cow house and a store. Anne Teresa was the landholder.

 

 

House 28 was the Royal Irish Constabulary Barracks and that had 2 census returns. One form (form H) was for the constables working and living there but they were only identified by their initials. The second form was a household return form for the acting sergeant’s family.

 

Padden Family

Head of the Padden family in house 28 (R.I.C. Barracks) was William (39) and his wife Margaret (34) and they had been married for 9 years and had had 4 children, all of whom survived. Their children lived with them and they were John James (8), Winifred Mary (6), Margaret Anne (4) and Patrick Michael (2). All were Roman Catholic with William being born in Co. Mayo and the rest of the family being born in Co. Galway ER. Margaret Anne and Patrick Michael could not read, but the rest of the family could read and write. William could speak Irish and English. William was the acting sergeant and before signing up to the R.I.C. he was a farmer’s son. John James and Winifred Mary were scholars. The building they lived in was a 5 roomed, 1stclass building with a turf house. Hector Graham was the landholder.

 

R.I.C. Barracks

As mentioned, the R.I.C. staff were only identified by their initials, however, W.P. on the form H, was William Padden. The occupants were W.P. (39), T.C. (26), J.H. (24), J.C. (23), J.S. (26) and J.C. (26). They could all read and write but only W.P. was listed as speaking both Irish and English which may indicate that the others only spoke English. All were Roman Catholic. W.P., T.C. and J.C. (26) were born in Co. Mayo. J.H. was born in Co. Westmeath, J.C. (23) was born in Co. Roscommon and J.S. was born in Co. Limerick. W.P. was the acting sergeant and the rest were constables. Before they joined the R.I.C. W.P., J.H. and the 2 J.C.’s were a farmer’s sons, T.C. was a soldier and J.S. was a commercial traveler. The building they lived in was a 5 roomed, 1stclass building with a turf house. Hector Graham was the landholder.

 

 

 

1901 Censusfor Letterfrack

Overview of Letterfrack in 1901

There were 32 buildings in Letterfrack according to the 1901 census although house 3 was not occupied. All the houses had stone, brick or concrete walls with houses 8, 10, 16, 17, 26, 27, 28 and 30 having thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing and the rest having slate, iron or tiled roofing. House 1 was the industrial school and house 2 was the police barracks. Houses 5 and houses 18 to 23 were lodgings. Houses 6, 8 and 32 were shops. House 9 is described as a public building and all the rest were private dwellings. Houses 1, 4, 5 and 24 were 1stclass dwellings, houses 16, 17, 18 to 23, 27 and 30 were 3rdclass dwellings and the rest were 2ndclass. The windows and rooms in each building were as follows:

 

Houses 18 to 23 had 2 rooms and 1 window

Houses 16, 17, 27, 29 and 30 had 2 rooms and 2 windows

Houses 26 and 28 had 2 rooms and 3 windows

House 32 had 2 rooms and 4 windows

House 23 had 2 rooms and 5 windows

Houses 10 and 12 to 15 had 3 rooms and 2 windows

Houses 9 and 31 had3 rooms and 3 windows

House 7 had 3 rooms and 6 windows

House 2 and 11 had 4 rooms and 5 windows

House 24 had 4 rooms and 6 windows

House 5 had 5 rooms and 6 windows

House 4 had 5 rooms and 8 windows

Houses 6 and 8 had 6 rooms and 3 windows

House 1 had 6 rooms and 20 windows

 

There were a total of 42 out buildings according to the out offices and farm-steadings return. They consisted of 9 stables, 5 coach houses, 2 harness rooms, 6 cow houses, 2 calf houses, a dairy, a piggery, 2 fowl houses, a boiling house, a barn, 3 turf houses, a potato house, a shed, a workshop, 2 stores, a forge and a laundry. A total of 211 people were in Letterfrack at that time of which 190 were male and 21 female. The enumerator was Const. Thomas Burke.

 

Letterfrack Industrial School 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

The first building listed on the 1901 census for Letterfrack was the Letterfrack Indusrial School. There were 163 residents there at that time of which 12 were staff members. They were Thomas G. Stephens (56), James H. Nolan (59), David C. O’Brien (35), Patrick M. MacManus (42), Thos (sic) G. Scott (39), Patrick D. O’Riordan (30), John A. O’Shea (28), Thomas Griffin (28), Francis Ormsby (18), Dan Delaney (19), William Egan (18) and Mary Sullivan (42). They were all able to speak both Irish and English except Mary, who only English. All could read and write. All were Roman Catholic. James H. Nolan, Thos (sic) G. Scott and John A. O’Shea Were born in Co. Tipperary, David C. O’Brien and Patrick D. O’Riordan were born in Co. Cork. Thomas G. Stephens was born in Co. Mayo, Patrick M. MacManus was born in Co. Cavan, Thomas Griffin was born in Co. Limerick and Dan Delaney was born in Dublin city. William Egan was born in Co. Cork and Mary Sullivan was born in Dublin City. Thomas Griffin, Francis Ormsby and Dan Delaney are listed as professors, William Egan was a painter, Mary Sullivan was a nurse and the other members of staff were listed as fellows.

 

The 151 male pupils are listed here under age groups.

15 year olds:

Nicholas Pelan, Denis O’Brien, James Ennis, John Flanagan, Francis Fox, James Jackson, Patrick Connolly, Stephen Joyce, Patrick Mortimer, John McGuirk, Thomas Keary, Patrick Hill, William Flynn, John Hall, James Conway, Peter O’Connor, Thomas Cooke and John Flynn.

 

All the 15 year old boys could read and write and were Roman Catholic. James Jackson, John McGuirk, Thomas Keary, and John Flynn could only speak English with the other boys being anle to speak both Irish and English. James Jackson, John McGuirk, Thomas Keary and John Flynn could only speak English but the others could speak both Irish and English. All were Roman Catholic. Nicholas Pelan, Francis Fox, James Jackson, Patrick Connolly, Stephen Joyce and Peter O’Connor were born in Co. Galway. John Hall, Patrick Mortimer, John McGuirk, Denis O’Brien and James Ennis were born in Dublin City.  Patrick Hill, William Flynn, James Conway, Thomas Cooke, John Flynn and John Flanagan were born in Co. Mayo and Thomas Keary was born in Co. Kilkenny. All these boys are listed as pupils.

 

 

 

14 year olds:

Thomas King, Tom Hazell, Michael MacManamon, George Power, Thomas Egan, Bartley Cooks, Thomas Lydon,

 

All these boys were Roman Catholic and could read and write. Thomas King, Michael MacManamon and Thomas Lydon could speak both Irish and English while the other 14 year olds could only speak English. Tom Hazell, George Power, Thomas Egan and Bartly Cooks could only speak English while Thomas King, Thomas Lydon and Michael MacManamon could speak both Irish and English. All these boys could read and write. Thomas King was born in Co. Galway and Tom Hazell in Galway City. George Power was born in Co. Dublin, Thomas Egan in Dublin City and Michael MacManamon, Bartley Cooks and Thomas Lydon were born in Co. Mayo. All were listed as pupils.

 

13 year olds:

Patrick Curley, John Fox, Martin Laffey, John Mitchell, Thomas Beaumon, John Davis, Patrick Flynn, Patrick Ginnelly, Tom Garvey, John Glynn, Edward Hogan, Patrick Mannion, Joseph Quinn, Peter Sullivan, William Conway, Joseph Flood, Peter Hayden, John Kearney, Laurence Lalor (sic), Geroge McDermott, Patrick Conroy, Patrick Flynn and John McNeela.

 

All the 13 year old boys were Roman Catholic and could read and write. John Davis, Patrick Flynn, Patrick Ginnelly, John Glynn, Joseph Quinn, William Conway, Joseph Flood, Peter Hayden, John Kearney, Laurence Lalor (sic), Patrick Flynn and John McNeela could only speak English while the other 13 year olds could speak both Irish and English. Patrick Curley and Patrick Flynn were born in Co. Roscommon and John Fox, Thomas Beaumon, Patrick Conroy, were born in Co. Galway. Martin Laffey, John Davis, Patrick Flynn, Patrick Ginnelly, Tom Garvey, Patrick Mannion, Joseph Quinn, William Conway, John Kearney and John McNeela were born in Co. Mayo and John Mitchell, Peter Sullivan, Joseph Flood, Laurence Lalor (sic), Geroge McDermott, were born in Dublin City. John Glynn was born in Co. Dublin and Edward Hogan was born in Co. Wicklow with Peter Hayden being born in Co. Kilkenny. All these boys were listed as pupils.

 

12 year olds:

John Hynes, George Millar, Walter Macken, James McNulty, Thomas Neiland, Patrick Nolan, John Philbin, Tom Stanton (sic), Stephen Brady, Patrick Kennedy, Patrick King, James McDermott, James McDonnell, Michael Mannion, Thady Rorke (sic), John Smyth, Patrick Walshe, Patrick Whelan, William Wynne, Stephen Conroy, John Devany, Walter Eggy, Michael Flanagan, Patrick Folan, Patrick Flynn, Thomas Feeney, John Green, John Hennelly, Martin Murphy, Patrick Mannion, Thomas Mulkerrin, William O’Neill, John Quinn, George Sherlock, Thomas Smyth, William Thompson, Patrick Bourke, John Beattie, John Bourke, Martin Granen (sic) and Michael McAndrew.

 

The largest age group in the Letterfrack Industrial School in 1901 was the 12 year olds with 41 pupils of that age. All were Roman Catholic and all could read and write. John Hynes, George Millar, Walter Macken, James McNulty, Patrick Nolan, John Philbin, Thady Rorke (sic), Stephen Conroy, John Devany and Thomas Mulkerrin could all speak Irish and English with all the other 12 year olds only speaking English. Thomas Neiland, Patrick Nolan, Patrick Walshe, Stephen Conroy, John Devany, Michael Flanagan, Patrick Folan, Patrick Flynn, Thomas Feeney, John Hennelly, Thomas Mulkerrin and Patrick Bourkewere all born in Co. Galway. Walter Macken, James McNulty, John Philbin, Michael Mannion, Walter Eggy, Martin Murphy,  Patrick Mannion, George Sherlock, Thomas Smyth, John Bourke and Martin Granen (sic) were all born in Co. Mayo. George Millar, Stephen Brady, Patrick Kennedy, Patrick King, James McDermott, James McDonnell, John Smyth, Patrick Whelan, William Wynne, John Green and William O’Neill were all born in Dublin City. John Hynes was born in Co. Dublin, Thady Rorke (sic) was born in Co. Roscommon and William Thompson was born in Galway City. Tom Stanton (sic) was born in Co. Wexford, Michael McAndrew was born in Co. Sligo, John Beattie was born in England and there is no place of birth recorded for John Quinn. All the boys are listed as pupils.

 

11 year olds:

John Tully, Christy Limmins, Stephen Coy, Michl (sic) Fletcher, Henry Murphy, William Neiland, Charles Davis, Patrick Fulham, Patrick Healy, Michael Macken, Michael Nolan, John Neiland, Michael Rorke (sic), Patrick Bourke, Bernard Brady, John Flynn, John Finlan, Thomas Hennelly, Michael Kennedy, Michael Murphy, Michael O’Donnell, John Sherlock, Willie Bermingham, Stephen Connelly, Michael Duffy, William Gordon, Patrick Heary (sic), James Kelly, Thomas Kelly and Thomas Ashe.

 

Again, all these boys were Roman Catholic and all of them could read and write. Michael Macken and Thomas Ashe could speak Irish and English while all the other 11 year old pupils could only speak English. Stephen Coy, William Neiland, Thomas Hennelly, Michael O’Donnell and Thomas Ashe were born in Co. Galway. Charles Davis, Patrick Healy, Michael Macken, John Neiland, Patrick Bourke, John Flynn, Michael Murphy, John Sherlock, Stephen Connelly and Patrick Heary (sic) were born in Co. Mayo. Christy Limmins, Michl (sic) Fletcher, Henry Murphy, Patrick Fulham, Bernard Brady, John Finlan, Michael Kennedy, William Gordon and James Kelly were all born in Dublin City. Willie Bermingham and Michael Duffy were born in Co. Dublin. Michael Rorke (sic) was born in Co. Roscommon, John Tully and Michael Nolan were born in Galway City and Thomas Kelly was born in Co. Monaghan. All these boys were listed as pupils.

 

10 year olds:

Edward O’Brien, John Conneely, Joseph Folan, Thomas Macken, Joseph McAuley, Michael McNeela, Festus McDonagal, Patrick Mulkerrins, Hubert Neilus, James Bourke, William Donaldson, Bernard Kelly, Edward Kearney, Thomas Macken, John McIntyre, John McDonagh, Patrick Daly, Joseph Farrell and Thomas Bodie.

 

All these boys could read and write and were Roman Catholic. Patrick Mulkerrins and Thomas Macken could speak both Irish and English while all the other boys only had English. Thomas Macken, Joseph McAuley, Michael McNeela, Hubert Neilus, James Bourke, William Donaldson, Thomas Macken, Edward Kearney and John McDonagh were born in Co. Mayo. John Conneely, Joseph Folan, Festus McDonagal, Patrick Mulkerrins and Bernard Kellywere born in Co. Galway. John McIntyre and Thomas Bodiewere born in Dublin City,Patrick Daly was born in Co. Dublin, Joseph Farrell in Kilkenny City and Edward O’Brien was born in Co. Waterford. All boys were recorded as pupils.

 

 

9 year olds:

James O’Donnell, James O’Rorke, James Jennings, Michael Linskey, Michael Kearney, John Lavelle, Richard Macken, John Macken and Patrick Murphy.

 

All the 9 year old boys could read and write and were Roman Catholic. They all could only speak English. James O’Donnell, James Jennings, Michael Linskey and John Lavellewere born in Co. Galway. Michael Kearney, Richard Macken, John Macken and Patrick Murphy were born in Co. Mayo and James O’Rorke was born in Co. Roscommon. All were listed as pupils.

 

8 year olds:

Joseph McDonnell, Martin Jennings and Peter Ashe.

 

The three 9 year olds were Roman Catholic and could read and write. They were all born in Co. Galway. Peter Ashe could only speak Irish and Joseph McDonnell and Martin Jennings could only speak English.

 

7 and 6 year olds:

Colman Curlin (6) and Thomas McDonagh (7).

 

Both these boys were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Colman Curlin could not read but Thomas McDonagh could read and write. Thomas could speak only English while Colman could speak both Irish and English. Both boys are listed as pupils.

 

The building that was the industrial school was a 6 roomed, 1stclass building with 3 stables, 2 coach houses, a harness room, 2 cow houses, a calf house, a dairy, a piggery, a fowl house, a boiling house, a barn, a turf house, a potato house, a workshop, a shed, a store, a forge and a laundry. The landholder was Rev. D. McEvilly.

 

 

House 3 was the Royal Irish Constabulary barracks and had 2 census return forms. The first was that of the sergeant’s family and the second was that for the sergeant and constables that lived in the barracks.

 

Duffy Family

The head of the Duffy family was Patrick (44). This information is found in the H form and the house and building return (form B1). His wife was Ellen (31) and their 4 children Andrew John (8), Patrick Joseph (7), Ellen (2) and Margaret (8 mths). All were Roman Catholic and Patrick was born in Co. Sligo, Ellen was born in Co. Limerick and the children were born in Co. Galway W R. With the exception of Ellen (2) and Margaret they could all read and write. Patrick was a sergeant with the R.I.C., Andrew John and Patrick Joseph were scholars and Ellen (2) and Margaret were listed as infants. The building was a 4 roomed, 2ndclass building with a turf house. Lucia Bolton was the landholder.

 

R.I.C. Barracks

The R.I.C. occupants were only identified by their initials although P.D. was Patrick Duffy (44). The others were E.R. (29), P.C. (27), T.B. (28) and F.J.M. (22). All were able to read and write. E.R. was a member of the Protestant Church of Ireland while the others were Roman Catholic. P.D. and P.C. were born in Co. Sligo, E.R. was born in Co. Mayo, T.B. was born in Co. Galway WR and F.J.M. was born in Co. Leitrim. P.D. was the sergeant with the others being constables. Before joining the R.I.C. P.C. was a publican’s son and the others were all farmer’s sons. The building was a 4 roomed, 2ndclass building with a turf house. Lucia Bolton was the landholder.

 

MacDonnell                            (additional surnames: Mullenand Hyland)

The occupants of house 4 were John Joseph (46) and with him in the house at that time were 2 servants Mary Mullen (60) and Martin Hyland (15). Mary and Martin could speak both Irish and English but nothing was entered for John Joseph. Mary could not read but both John Joseph and Martin could read and write. All were Roman Catholic with Mary and Martin being born in Co. Galway and John Joseph being born in Co. Roscommon. John Joseph is listed as General Practitioner F A Q P Y S Enlinst(sic) on Journey Doctor and Mary and Martin were listed as general servants. The house they occupied was a 5 roomed, 1stclass dwelling with a stable, a coach house, a harness room and a cow house. John Joseph was the landholder.

 

Mongan Family

The Mongan family consisted of just 2. Those being Harry (68) and his wife Mary (63). Both could speak both Irish and English but only Harry could read and write. Both were Roman catholic and born in Co. Galway WR. Harry is recorded as being a postman and Mary a housekeeper. Their house was a 5 roomed, 1stclass lodging house. The landholder was (?) D. Board[xxix].

 

Sullivan                                   (additional surname: O’Malley)

There were 2 occupants of house 6, those being Frank Sullivan (25) and Michael O’Malley (18). Both could speak both Irish and English and could read and write. Both were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Mayo. Both were listed as being shop assistants. The building they shared was a 6 roomed, 2ndclass shop with a stable, coach house and turf house. The Land holder was R. O’Grady.

 

Nelly                           (additional Surnames: Kenny, Shanahan and Lyden)

Head of the family in house 7 was Annie T. (50). Living with her was her widowed daughter Mary E. Kenny (27) and her grandchildren John F. Kenny (5) and Mary T. Kenny (3). Also in the house were a boarder Bridget Shanahan (20) and a servant Patrick Lyden (30). All were Roman Catholic. Annie T. was born in White Haven, England, Mary E. was born in New York, John F. and Patrick were born in Co. Galway, Mary T. was born in Co. Mayo and Bridget was born in Co. Limerick. Patrick spoke both Irish and English while the others spoke only English. Mary T. could not read, Patrick could read only and the rest could read and write. Annie T. is recorded as being a post office official, Mary T. was a post office assistant, Bridget was a telegraphist (sic), Patrick was a farm labourer and Mary E. and John F. were scholars. The house they lived in was a 3 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable, a coach house, cow house, calf house and a fowl house. Annie T. Nelly was the landholder.

 

Mullen Family                                    (additional surname: King)

House 8 was the home of the Mullen family. Head of the family was Michael (42) and his wife Ellen (25). Four of their children lived with them at that time, they were May (5), Bridget (4), Martin (3) and Patrick (2). Also in the house were 2 servants Kate King (19) and John Mullen (19) along with Michael’s sister Anne (27). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. May, Bridget, Martin, Patrick and Kate could not read but the others could read and write. Michael, Ellen, Kate, John and Anne could speak both Irish and English. Michael and Ellen are listed as being shopkeepers, Kate and John were general servants and May and Bridget were scholars. Their house was a 6 roomed, 2ndclass shop with a stable, coach house, cow house and store. The landholder was Michael Mullen.

 

Lydon                                    (additional surname: Conneely)

There were only 2 occupants of house 9 in Letterfrack in 1901. The widow Mary Lydon (60) was recorded as the head of the family and living with her was a boarder, Mary Conneely (65). Both were born in Co. Galway WR and were Roman Catholic. Neither could read, Mary Lydon could speak both Irish and English and Mary Conneely could only speak Irish. Mary Lydon was a house keeper and Mary Conneely was a domestic servant. The house they shared was a 3 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling. The landholder was the Council of Clifden Union.

 

Gibbons Family                                  (additional surname: Coyne)

Head of the Gibbons family was the widow Bridget (46). She had 5 of her sons living in the house as well and they were Patrick (25), Martin (23), Michael (21), William (19) and John (9). As well as these there was a lodger, Martin Coyne (80) who was a widower. John could speak English but all the others had both Irish and English language. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin Coyne could not read, Bridget could read only and the rest could read and write. Bridget is listed as being a house keeper, Patrick was a basket maker, Martin Gibbons was a carpenter, Michael and William were labourers, John ws a scholar and Martin Coyne was a Tailor. Their house was a 3 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and the landholder was Rev. D. McEvilly.

 

Faherty Family                                   (additional surname: Moran)

Head of the Faherty family in house 11 was Martin (45) and his wife Mary (40) along with their children Mary (7), Martin (4), Patrick (2) and Anne (6mths). Also in the house was a boarder John Moran (25). All were Roman Catholic, John Moran was born in Co. Mayo and the others were born in Co. Galway WR. Martin (45), Mary (40) and John could speak both Irish and English while Mary (7), Martin (4) and Patrick could only speak English. Martin (4), Patrick and Anne could not read but the others, with the exception of baby Anne, could read and write. Martin (45) was a farmer, Mary (40) was a farmer’s wife, Mary (7) was a scholar and John Moran is listed as being a backer. The house they shared was a 4 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable, coach house and a cow house. Martin Faherty was the landholder.

 

Flanagan Family                                  (additional surname: Maher)

The head of the Flanagan family was William (26) and his wife Johanna (24) along with their children Mary (2), Willey (sic) (1) and Sarah (3 mths). Also living with them was William’s niece Katie Maher (14). All, with the exception baby Sarah, had English as a language. William, Johanna and Katie could read and write. Sarah was born in Co. Galway while the others were born in Nenagh, Co. Tipperary. All were Roman Catholic. William was a boot and shoe maker, Johanna was a dressmaker and Katie was a scholar. The house was a 3 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and the landholder was the Rev. D. McEvilly.

 

Francis Family

House 13 was that of the Francis family and the head of the family was Michael (36). Living in the house with him were his wife Sarah (30) and their children Ellen (8), Thomas (4), Martin (2) and Mary Keate (sic) (5mths). Martin could speak English while the others, with the exception of baby Mary, could speak both Irish and English. Michael, Sarah and Ellen could read and write with the others not being able to. All were catholic and born in Galway City. Michael was a tailor and Sarah, Ellen and Thomas were scholars. The house they lived in was a 3 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and the landholder was the Rev. D. McEvilly.

 

Conneely Family

Head of the Conneely family was Peter (26) and his wife Anne (29). Also living with them at that time were their children Mary Ellen (5), Patrick (3) and Bridget (1). Mary Ellen and Patrick had only English as a language but Peter and Anne could speak both Irish and English. Peter and Anne were only ones to be able to read and write. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Peter was a carpenter while Mary Ellen and Patrick were scholars. Their house was a 3 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and the landholder was the Rev. D. McEvilly.

 

Moran Family

There were only 2 occupants of house 15 with the head of the household being Peter (40) and his nephew Paul (14). Both could read and write, Paul could only speak English while Peter could speak both Irish and English. Both were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Mayo. Peter is listed as being a blacksmith and Paul a pupil. The house they shared was a 3 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and the landholder was the Re. D. McEvilly.

 

Carter family

The Carter family consisted of 6 members with the head of the family being the widow Catherine (50). Also in the house with her were her children Kate (20), Bridget (19), Martin (16), Margaret (10) and Elizabeth (6). All were members of the Roman Catholic Church and were born in Co Galway. All, with the exception of Elizabeth, could read and write and Catherine could speak both Irish and English with the rest speaking only English. Catherine was a farmer, Kate and Bridget were domestic servants, Martin was a basket maker and Margaret was a scholar. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with the landholder being Mitchel Henry.

 

Ownsworth Family

The head of the Ownsworth family was the widow Kate (48) and her 2 daughters Katie (17) and Julia (15). Kate could speak both Irish and English while Katie and Julia only had English as a language. Katie and Julia could read and write while Kate could not read. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Kate was a farmer and Katie and Julia were assistants. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with Mitchel Henry as the landholder.

 

Morgan

The sole occupant of house 18 was the widow Mary (60). She was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. She could not read and spoke both Irish and English. She is listed as being a domestic servant. The house she lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and the landholder was Mitchel Henry.

 

Walsh

There was only the one occupant in house 19 and that was the widow Bridget (60). She was a Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. She could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Bridget was a general servant. Her house was a 2 roomed 3rdclass dwelling and Mitchel Henry was the landholder.

 

Conroy

There was only a sole occupant of house 20. That was the widow Honor (80). Honor could not read but could speak both Irish and English. She was a Roman catholic and was born in Co. Galway. Honor was listed as a general servant. Her house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and the landholder was Mitchel Henry.

 

Daley[xxx]

The widow Margret (60) lived alone in house 21. She was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway. She could not read but could speak both Irish and English. Margret was a general servant. Her house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house and the landholder was Mitchel Henry.

 

Cranston Family

Head of the Cranston family was Mary (60). Living with her were 2 of her sons, Joseph (30) and Arthur (22). All three could read and write with Mary speaking both Irish and English while Joseph and Arthur only had English as a language. All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house and the landholder was Mitchel Henry.

 

Daly Family                            (additional surname: Kenny)

Head of the family was the widow Ellen (70) and her 2 grandsons John Kenny (20) and James Kenny (18). All the family were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. All could speak both Irish and English with John and James being able to read and write and Ellen not being able to. Ellen was a general servant while both John and James were labourers. The house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house and the landholder was Mitchel Henry.

 

Kenny

The only occupant of house 24 was Mary Kenny (46) who was a widow. She could read and write and could speak both Irish and English. She was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. Her occupation is listed as a housekeeper. The house she lived in was a 4 roomed, 1stclass dwelling and the landholder was Mitchel Henry.

 

McAndrew                             (additional surnames: Gibbonsand McDonnell)

Head of the household in house 25 was Bartholomew (59). Also in the house were 2 servants Margaret Gibbons (38) and Thomas McDonnell (15). All 3 could speak both Irish and English and could read and write. All 3 were Roman Catholic with Thomas being born in Co. Galway and the other 2 being born in Co. Mayo. Bartholomew was a parish priest and Margaret and Thomas were domestic servants. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and Bartholomew McAndrew was the landholder.

 

Joyce family

The Joyce family consisted of 8 members with the head of the family being Michael (48). Also in the house were his wife Ellen (44) and their 6 daughters Mary (19), Norah (17), Bridget (15), Ellen (12), Elizabeth (11) and Alice (4). All, with the exception of Alice, could read and write. Michael, Ellen (44) and Mary could speak Irish and English while Norah, Bridget and Ellen (12) only had English for a language. Nothing was entered for Elizabeth and Alice. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael is recorded as being a mason, Ellen (44), Mary and Norah were housekeepers and Bridget, Ellen (12) and Elizabeth were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and Michael Joyce was the landholder.

 

Kelly Family

The Kelly family in house 27 consisted of John (80) and his wife Margret (95). Both spoke Irish and English but could not read. Both were born in Co. Tipperary and were Roman Catholics. John was a farm labourer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house and Mitchel Henry was the landholder.

 

Joyce Family                          (additional surnames: Lyden)

The head of the Joyce family was Pat (88) and his wife Honoria (72). Also in living in the house were there children Mary (40) and Martin (33) and also a son / elder son ?[xxxi]Walter (18), along with a servant, Michael Lyden (23). All could speak Irish and English but only Mary, Martin, Walter and Michael could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholics. Pat was a farmer and Mary was a farmer’s daughter. Martin was a butcher with Walter and Michael being apprentice butchers. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Mitchel Henry was the landholder.

 

Cassidy Family                                   (additional surname: Gibbons)

Head of the Cassidy family was John (54) and his wife Kate (50). Also in the house with them at that time were 2 relatives Agnes Gibbons (17) and Elizabeth Gibbons (7). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Elizabeth could speak only English but the rest had both Irish and English as languages. John and Elizabeth could read and Kate and Agnes could read and write. John is listed as being a farmer, Kate was a farmer’s wife, Agnes was an assistant and Elizabeth was a scholar. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house and a calf house.  John Cassidy was the landholder.

 

Mannion Family                                 (additional surnames: Hynes)

Martin (50) was the head of the family in house 30. He lived there with his wife Mary (45) and their daughter Mary (9) along with a boarder Honor Hynes (65). All could speak both Irish and English and also read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin was a labourer with Mary (45) listed as a labourer’s wife. Mary (9) was a scholar and Honor was a general servant. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with a cow house and Martin Mannion was the landholder.

 

McCarthy Family

The last house in Letterfrack was that of the McCarthy family. The head of the family was Carthage (sic) (40) and his wife Annie Mary (36). Their children also lived in the house and they were Kathleen A. (8), Norah C. (6), John P. (5) and Ernest P. (2). All were Roman Catholic, except Annie Mary who was listed as Protestant Church of England. Carthage (sic) was born in Wales and the rest of the family were born in England. Carthage (sic), Annie Mary, Kathleen A. and Norah C. could read and write. Carthage was listed as being a basket (?)[xxxii]and all the children were scholars. Their house was a 3 roomed, 2ndclass with a cow house. Carthage McCarthy was the landholder.

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Letterfrack

Anne Jennings– Application No. C17 1322. Anne’s application was received on 09/02/1917 and was 70 at that time. Her address at that time was Mrs C. Crehan, Renvyle, Galway. Her parent’s names are given as Edward and Celia Jennings (Diamond). The returned search was dated 12/02/1917 and a pension of 2s was awarded.

 

Elizabeth Lavelle– Application No. C21 1044. Elizabeth’s application was received on 07/02/1921 and her address at the time of her application was given as Mrs Elizabeth Vallely (sic), Tully, Renvyle, Clifden Co. Galway. He parents names were given as Peter and Anne Lavelle (Ruane). The search was returned on 11/02/1921 and marked “not found”.

 

Joseph McNab– Application No. C21 927. Joseph’s application was received on 02/02/1921. His address at the time of his application was given as Mr J. E. McNab, 6 Ida Crescent, Leeds. His parent’s names were given as George and Bridget McNab (Wallace). The search was returned on 09/02/21 with the note “Not found”.

 

Bridget Burke– Application No. C17 5346. The application was received on 19/07/1917. Bridget’s address at the time of her application was Cawrosmore, Letterfrack, Co. Galway. Her parent’s names are given as Ambrose and Bridget Burke (Coyne). The returned search was dated 21/07/1917 with hand written notes saying:

 

Amby and Bridy Burke Married 1835

No return of Bridget.

Martin                         14

Mary               10

Michael           11        Died 1847

Bridget                        6            “

Margret           3            “

 

Sheet 10X

 

A copy was dispatched to applicant on 25/07/1917.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Letterfrack

According to Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Robert Graham leased tenements to a number of people in the townland of Letterfrack. James Ellis leased 915 Acres and 9 Perches from Robert Graham for an annual ratable valuation of £47 for the land and £20 for houses and offices and £1 for a herd’s house. James Ellis then leased a house each to John Diamond for 5s and Charles Kelly for 15s. James Ellis also leased a meeting house and a school house for £2 10s annually. James also leased a petty sessions house for a half annual rent of £2 10s. William Noon leased a house from James Ellis for £2 15s. Mrs Hawkshaw leased 2 Roods of land containing house, offices and garden for 7s for the land and £1 8s for the buildings. Guardians of the Poor of the Clifden Union leased a dispensary from James Ellis for £3 annualy. The constabulary force leased a police barracks and garden from Robert Graham. This consisted of 1 Rood and 20 Perches of land for which they paid 5s for the land and 15s for the buildings. Robert Graham paid a half annual rent of £10. James Feeney, Michael Leddy, Stephen Keady, Michael Joyce and Bridget Carey jointly leased 23 Acres, 2 Roods and 3 Perches of land which 2 houses included. Each of them paid 5s for the land and James Feeney paid 15s for a house and Bridget Cary paid 5s for her house. Patrick Walsh leased 10 Acres of land from James Ellis that included a house and office. He paid £3 5s for the land and 15s for the buildings. Charles Evens leased 8 Acres and 7 Perches from Robert Graham that included a house and offices. He paid £1 10s for the land and £13 10s for the buildings. William and John Lyden jointly leased an area of land of 10 Acres and 35 Perches from James Ellis for an annual rate of 10s each and William also paid 10s for a house and John paid 5s for a house on that land. Michael Cowan and Mary McDonald jointly leased 5 Acres, 2 Roods and 25 Perches of land including houses from James Ellis for which they paid 5s each for their share of the land and £1 5s each for their houses. Martin O’Flaherty leased 195 Acres, 2 Roods and 11 Perches from Robert Graham that included a house and office. He paid £13 for the land and £5 for the buildings. Patrick Powell leased 4 Acres, 2 Roods and 3 Perches of land that contained a house from James Ellis for which he paid £1 for the land and 10s for the house. Honoria Conry, Loftus Dancer, Anthony King, Thomas Eastwood and Robert Graham had 30 Acres, 1 Rood and 30 Perches of land. Honoria’s part of the land had a house and offices and she paid £1 for the land and 15s for the buildings to Robert Graham. Loftus Dancer had a house and land for which he paid Robert Graham 15s each for the land and house. Anthony King paid 5s each for land and house to Thomas Eastwood. Thomas Eastwood paid Robert Graham 1s for his area of land that was an area of bog. Robert Graham had an area of bog on this land that he paid 4s annually. Stephen Keady and Anthony Joyce jointly leased and area of 2 Acres and 7 Perches from James Ellis that included a house and office for Stephen and a house for Anthony. Stephen paid 7s for his part of the land and 8s for the buildings and Anthony paid 8s for his part of the land and 5s for the house. Patrick Lyden leased 10 Acres and 24 Perches of land from James Ellis for 15s for the land and 5s for a house on that land. Thomas Keady leased 12 Acres and 1 Rood from James Ellis for which he paid £1 for the land and 5s for a house on that land. Michael Joyce leased 7 Acres and2 Roods on which there was a house and offices. He paid James Ellis £1 for the land and 5s for the buildings. There was also an area of 18 Acres and 15 Perches of water in this townland. There were also some exemptions of payment, and they were the £2 10s for the meeting house and school house, £ 2 10s for the petty sessions house, £3 for the dispensary and the total of £6 for the police barracks and garden.

 

 

1670 Down Survey for Letterfrack

The name for this area in the 1670 Down Survey was Litterfrack. The 1640 owner was the Catholic Teige Kittagh and the in 1670 the owner was Richard, Earl of Westmeath, also a Catholic. There were 270 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 49 plantation acres of profitable land. 49 plantation acres of land were forfeited.

 

 

Maumfin

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Maumfin

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       106.47 acres / 106 acres, 1 rood, 35 perches

 

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

1911 Census for Maumfin  (no records)

1901 Census for Maumfin  (no records)

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Maumfin  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Maumfin

Logainm for Maumfin

NUI Galway Digital Collections forMaumfin

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Maumfin

According to the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Robert Graham leased 2 tenements to James Beresford and Thomas Y. Prior. James Beresford leased 34 Acres, 1 Rood and 35 Perches of land at a rate of £9 annually. Thomas Y. Prior leased 72 Acres, 3 Roods and 30 Perches of land at an annual rate of £19.

 

 

1670 Down Survey for Maumfin

The name for this area in the 1670 Down Survey was Mamffin and Ardkell. In 1641 the owner was Edmund O’Flaharty, a Catholic and in 1670 the owner was the Catholic Richard, earl of Westmeath. There were 154 plantation acres of unprofitable land and 74 plantation acres of profitable land. 74 plantation acres were forfeited.

 

 

Moyard

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Moyard

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       1175.67 acres / 1175 acres, 2 roods, 27 perches

 

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

Map

Galway Library for Moyard

Logainm for Moyard

NUI Galway Digital Collections forMoyard

 

 

1911 Census for Moyard

Overview of Moyard in 1911

In the 1911 census there were 19 houses in Moyard of which 2 were uninhabited at the time, house 14 and house 15, which was Moyard national school. All the houses were built with stone, brick or concrete walls with houses 1, 2 and 16 having slate, iron or tiled roofing and the rest having thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing. House 1 was a 1stclass dwelling, houses 2, 4, 10 and 16 were 2ndclass houses and the rest were 3rdclass. Houses 5 and 6 had 2 rooms and 1 window, houses 3, 7-9 and 11-13 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, houses 4 and 10 had 2 rooms an d3 windows, house 2 had 2 rooms and 6 windows, house 16 had 3 rooms and 4 windows and house 1 had 5 rooms and 5 windows. There were a total of 44 out buildings according to the out offices an farm-steadings form. Those included 10 stables, 2 coach houses, 1 harness room, 13 cow houses, 10 calf houses, 3 piggeries, a fowl house, a barn, a turf house, a store and a shed. There were a total of 51 people living in Moyard, 22 male and 29 female. The enumerator was Const. John Hickey.

 

Irwin Family                           (additional surnames: Hinde, Conneely andFaherty)

House 1 was the home of the Irwin family with Benjamin (68) as the head of the family. He lived with his wife Emily J. Burton Irwin (66) who he had been married to for 40 years and they’d had 10 children of which 7 had survived. They had 2 of their daughters in the house at that time and they were Mary Emily (30) and Millicent Hazell (25). There was a visitor at the time of the census, Muriel A. Hinde (22) and 2 servants, Mary Ellen Conneely (17) and Bridgid Mary Faherty (16). They could all read and write but only Mary Ellen could speak both Irish and English as there was nothing entered for the others, which possibly meant they could only speak English. Benjamin, Emily, Mary Emily and Millicent were Protestant Episcopalian Church of Ireland, Muriel was Church of England and Mary Ellen Conneely and Bridgid Mary Faherty were Roman Catholic. Benjamin was born in Co. Roscommon, Emily J. Burton was born in Co. Louth, Muriel A. Hinde was born in Lucknow and the other 4 were born in Co. Galway. Benjamin was a clerk in the holy order Church of Ireland, Mary Ellen was a cook domestic servant and Bridgid Mary was a house maid dom servt (sic). Their house was a 5 roomed 1stclass dwelling with 3 stables, 2 coach houses, a harness room, a cow house, 3 calf houses, a fowl house, a barn, a turf house, a shed and a store. Rev. Benjamin Irwin was the landholder.

 

MacConrígh Family[xxxiii]                                  (additional surname: Bean MacConrígh)

Head of the MacConrígh family was Peadáir (58) and his wife Brighid bean MacConrígh (56). Their children also lived in the house and they were Mícheál (21), Peadhráigh (19), Máire (18), Teresa (16) and Suibháin (14).

 

Adams Family

House 3 was that of the Adams family. Head of the family was Michael (74) and his wife Hanoria (sic) (65) and they’d been married for 39 years and had had 10 children of which 7 survived. Also living with them were 2 of their children Brigdid (sic) (20) and Patrick (19). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael (74) and Hanoria (sic) could speak both Irish and English with Brigdid (sic) and Michael (19) only speaking English. Michael (74) could not read, Hanoria (sic) could only read while Brigdid (sic) could read and write. Michael (74) was a farmer, Brigdid (sic) was a farmer’s daughter and Michael (19) was a farmer’s son. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house, calf house and piggery. Michael Adams was the landholder.

 

Adams Family

House 4 was also an Adams family household. Head of the family was the widow Catherine (63) who had had 7 children of which 5 survived and 2 of her children Thady (33) and Mary (21) lived with her.  All had both Irish and English language and could also read and write. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Thady is recorded as being a farmer’s son. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass house with a stable, cow house and calf house. Kate Adams was listed as the landholder.

 

Lyden Family

Head of the Lyden family in house 5 was John (72) and his wife Bessie (63). They had been married for 41 years and had had 9 children of which 8 survived. Three of their children lived with them, they were Michael (35), Martin (28) and Maggie (24). All had both Irish and English as languages and all, except John, could read and write. all were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John is listed as being a farmer, Michael and Martin were farmer’s sons and Maggie was a farmer’s daughter. Their house was a 2 roomed, third class house with a cow house, calf house and piggery. John Lyden was the landholder.

 

Gibbons

The sole occupant of house 6 in 1911 was John (74). He was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. He spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. He is listed as being a farmer. The house in which he lived was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house. John was the landholder.

 

Lyden Family

This Lyden family consisted of 8 members. Head of the family was John (51) and his wife Bridget (42) who had been married for 10 years and had had 6 children all of which survived. Those children lived with them and were Mary (10), Sarah Jane (8), Martin Paul (6), John (4), Patrick (3) and Joseph (5mths). Peter and Bridget spoke both Irish and English. John, Bridget, Mary and Sarah Jane could read and write but the others in the family could not. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Peter was a farmer with Mary, Sarah Jane and Martin Paul being scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with a stable, cow house and piggery. John Lyden was the landholder.

 

Lyden

The only occupant of house 8 was Jane (32). She could read and write, was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. There is nothing listed for language or occupation. Her house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with a cow house and a calf house. Jane was the landholder.

 

King Family

House 9 was the home of Martin (40) and his wife Catherine (25). Both were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Both spoke Irish and English and could read and write. John is listed as being a farmer. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with stable and cow house. Martin King was the landholder.

 

King Family                           (additional surnames: Lynch)

The head of the family in house 10 was Michael (72) and his wife Bridget (70) who had been married for had been marries for 40 years and had had 12 children but only 6 survived. Two of their children, James (27) and Annie (25) lived with them. A visitor, Joseph Lynch (5) was also listed as being in the house at that time. Joseph could not read. The others in the house could all speak Irish and English and could also read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael was a farmer, James was a farmer’s son and Annie a farmer’s daughter. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass house with a stable, cow house and calf house. Michael King was the landholder.

 

Canning Family

The Canning family consisted of 8 members. Head of the family was Pat (58) who had been married to his wife Bridget (47) for 25 years. They’d had 8 children of which 6 survived. Those 6 children were John (24), Mary (23), Bridget (18), Annie (16), Maggie (13) and (?)[xxxiv](11) and they lived with them at that time. All, with the exception of Bridget (47) could read and write. Maggie and (?) (11) could speak only English but the others spoke both Irish and English. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Pat is recorded as a farmer, John was a farmer’s son, Mary and Bridget (18) were farmer’s daughters and the other children were scholars. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable , cow house and calf house. Pat Canning was the landholder.

 

McDonnell Family

The head of the McDonnell family was Festus (67) and his wife Mary (65) who had been married for 39 years and had had 8 children all of whom had survived. Four of those children lived with them and they were Thomas (30), Festus (27), Anthony (23) and Albert (8). All, with the exception of Albert, spoke both Irish and English.. Festus (67) and Mary could not read but the others could all read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Festus (67) was a shepherd, Thomas Festus (27) and Anthony were farmer servants and Albert was a scholar. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with stable, cow house and calf house. Festus McDonnell was the landholder.

 

Canning Family

The head of the family was the widow Margaret (60) who had had 4 children of which 3 survived. Three of her children lived with her and they were William (18), James (16) and Mary (14). Also in the house with them at that time was a lodger Mary Canning (90) who was a widow and was also deaf. Mary (90) and Margaret could not read but the others could read and write. Mary (90) only spoke Irish but the others spoke both Irish and English. Margaret is listed as being, what looks like, Chatholic but the others were all Roman Catholic. William and James were born in America with the others being born in Co. Galway. William and James are listed as farmer’s sons and Mary (14) was a scholar. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with a cow house. Margaret canning was the landholder.

 

Neild Family

The last occupied house in Moyard in 1911 was that of the Neild family. Head of the family was Benjamin (26) and his wife Catherine (27) who had been married for 3 years and had had 2 children, both surviving. Their children were Catherine (2) and Benjamin (7mths). Only Benjamin (26) and Catherine (27) could read and write. Benjamin was a member of the Church of Ireland while the others were Roman Catholic. Benjamin (7mths) was born in Co. Galway while the others were all born in England. Benjamin (26) was a groom. The house they lived in was a 3 roomed, 2ndclass house with a shed. The landholder was the Rev. Benjamin Irwin.

 

1901 Census for Moyard

Overview of Moyard in 1901

There were 17 buildings in Moyard in the 1901 census with all except house 16, which was a lodging house, being private dwellings. All houses were built of stone, brick or concrete walls. Houses 1 and 5 had slate, iron or tiled roofs and the rest had thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing. House 7 was a 4thclass dwelling, Houses 1, 4, 5, 6 and 10 were 2ndclass dwellings and the rest were 3rdclass. Houses 3, 9, 11-13 and 16 had 1 room and 1 window in the front, Houses 2, 8, 14, 15, and 17 had 1 room and 2 windows, house 10 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, houses 4 and 6 had 2 rooms and 3 windows, house 5 had 3 rooms and 6 windows, house 1 had 4 rooms and 4 windows but house 7 had no rooms and no windows. There were a total of 53 people, 19 male and 34 female. The enumerator was Const. Edward Robinson.

 

Irwin Family                           (additional surnames: McRobert, Joyce andKing)

The head of the Irwin family was Benjamin (58) and his wife Emily B. (56). Also living in the house were Benjamin’s mother Frances (82), their children Lily (16), Hazell (15) and Emily J. (13). As well as those, there were 4 visitors Lydia M. McRobert (43), Annie McRobert (14), Alfred M.B. Irwin (47) and Kathleen E. Irwin (15) and 2 servants Fanny Joyce (17) and Margaret King (17). Fanny and Margaret spoke both Irish and English but nothing was entered for the rest which could mean that they only spoke English. All of the household could read and write. Benjamin, Lydia M. and Alfred M.B. were born in Co. Roscommon, Emily B. was born in Co. Louth, Frances was born in Dublin, Lily, Hazell, Emily J., Fanny and Margaret were born in Co. Galway. Annie was born in Co. Down and Kathleen E. was born in Burma. Fanny and Margaret were Roman Catholic, Lydia M. and Annie were Presbyterian and the rest were Church of Ireland. Benjamin was listed as being a clergyman Insurance, Lily, Hazell, Emily J., Annie and Kathleen E. were scholars, Alfred M.B. was with the Indian civil service, Fanny was a housemaid-domestic and Margaret was a cook-domestic. They shared a 4 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with Benjamin Irwin being the landholder.

 

McDonnell Family

The McDonnell family had 4 members. The head of the family was Michael (31) and his wife Mary (30) and their 2 children Bridget (4) and John (3). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael and Mary could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Michael was a farmer, Mary, a farmer’s wife, Bridget, a farmer’s daughter and John, a farmer’s son. Their house was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Michael McDonnell was the landholder.

 

Gibbons Family                                  (additional surnames: Maddin (sic))

Head of the Gibbons family was the widow Bridget (81) and with her in the house were her son John (35) and a boarder Anne Maddin (90). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. All spoke Irish and English but only John could read and write. Bridget was in farming and John was a farmer’s son. Their house was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Bridget was the landholder.

 

Lyden Family

House 4 was that of the Lyden family with the head of the family being the widow Jane (70). With her in the house at that time were her son Peter (30) and his wife Delia (25) and Jane’s granddaughter Jane (18). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. Jane (70) was a farmer, Peter was a farmer’s son, Delia was a farmer’s wife and Jane (18) was a farmer’s daughter. They lived in a 2 roomed, 2ndclass house and Jane Lyden was the landholder.

 

King Family

The King family in house 5 consisted of 7 members. The head of the family was Peter (41) and his wife Delia (39). Five of their children also lived with them and they were Michael (11), Patrick (10), Mary Kate (7), Teresia (sic) (5) and Julia (3). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All, with the exception of Julia spoke Irish and English and could read and write. Peter is recorded as a farmer and sub postman, Delia was in farming and an assistant SP mistress. All the children were scholars. Their house was a 3 roomed, 2ndclass house and Peter King was the landholder.

 

Adams Family

The head of the Adams family in house 6 was the widow Catherine (49). Living with her at that time were 3 of her children Theady (sic) (26), Kate (16) and Mary (14). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Kate could not read and there was nothing entered under language. The others all spoke Irish and English and could read and write. Catherine was in farming with Theady (sic) being a farmer’s son, Kate a farmer’s daughter and Mary was a scholar. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and Catherine Adams was the landholder.

 

Coyne Family

There were just the 2 family members living in house 7. Head of the family was Michael (60) and his wife Annie (61). They were roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Both spoke both Irish and English but could not read. Michael was a farmer and Annie was a farmer’s wife. The house they shared was a 4thclass house that had no rooms recorded. Michael Coyne was the landholder.

 

King Family

House 8 was the King household. Head of the family was Mark (81) and living with him were his wife Margret (72) and his son Martin (28). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All 3 spoke both Irish and English with Mark and Martin being able to read and write and Margret only being able to read. Mark was listed as being a farmer, Margret, a farmer’s wife and Mark a farmer’s son. Their house was a single roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Mark King was the landholder.

 

King Family

Head of this King family was Michael (70) and his wife Bridget (50). Also living with them were their children Anne (20), James (18) and Fanny (16). All spoke both Irish and English and all could read and write with the exception of Michael who could only read. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael was listed as being a farmer, his wife Bridget, a farmer’s wife, Anne and Fanny were famer’s daughters and James a farmer’s son. Their house was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Michael King was the landholder.

 

Pollington Family                               (additional surname: Mullin)

Head of the Pollington family was Hennery (sic) (29). Also in the house at that time were his wife Mary (26), his children, Charlie (4), Thomas (2) and Annie (6mths) along with Hennery’s (sic) sister-in-law Maria Mullin (18). Mary and Maria spoke both Irish and English with the rest, apart from baby Annie, spoke only English. Charlie could read only, Thomas and Annie could not read and the rest could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were members of the Church of Ireland. Hennery (sic) was a coachman, Charlie is listed as being a schollar (sic) and Mary Mullin was a farmer’s daughter. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and the landholder was Benjamin Irwin.

 

Canning Family

House 11 was the Canning household. Head of that family was Michael (90) and living with him were his wife Mary (70) and a visitor, Bridget Canning (65). All spoke Irish but none of them could read. All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Michael was a farmer, Mary, a farmer’s wife and Bridget a farmer’s daughter. They lived in a 1 roomed, 3rdclass house and Michael Canning was the landholder.

 

Canning Family

This Canning family in house 12 had 9 members. Head of the family was Patrick (40) and his wife Bridget (30). With them in the house were their 7 children John (15), Mary (13), Patrick (11), Bridget (9), Anney (sic) (5), Maggy (3) and Katie (3mths). Patrick (40), Bridget (30) and John spoke both Irish and English but there was no entry for the others, possible meant they only spoke English. The 2 youngest, Maggy and Katie could not read, Patrick (40), John and Mary could read and write and the others could read only. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick (40) was recorded as being a farmer, Bridget (30) was a farmer’s wife, John was a farmer’s son and Mary, Patrick (11), Bridget (9) and Anney (sic) were scholars. The house they lived in was a single roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and the landholder was Patrick Canning.

 

Canning Family

House 13 was the home of another Canning family. The head of this family was the widow Margret[xxxv](38). Living with her were 3 of her children William (7), James (5) and Mary (3). All were Roman Catholic and Margret and Mary were born in Co. Galway, while William and James were born in America. All with the exception of Mary spoke both Irish and English. William and James could read only, Mary could not read and Margret could read and write. Margret was in farming and William and James were scholars. Their house was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass house and Margaret Canning was the landholder.

 

Adams Family

The head of this Adams family was Michael (62). In the house with him were his wife Hnor (sic) (47) and their children John (23), Michael (16), Martin (14), Bridget (12) and Patrick (8). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael (62) and Hnor (sic) could not read while the others could read and write. Michael (62), Hnor (sic), John, Michael (16) and Martin spoke both Irish and English. Michael (62) is listed as a farmer, Hnor (sic), john and Michael were listed as farming and Martin, Bridget and Patrick were scholars. Their house was a single roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and the landholder was Michael Adams.

 

Lyden Family

House 15 was home to the Lyden family. Head of the family was John (56) and his wife Bessie (48). Their children also lived with them and they were Michael (22), Norah (19), Kate (16), Maggie (14) and Martin (10). Maggie and Martin spoke only English but the rest could speak both Irish and English. All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. All, except John, could read and write.John was recorded as being a farmer, Bessie, a farmer’s wife, Michael, a farmer’s son and Norah and Kate, farmer’s daughters. Maggie and Martin were scholars. The house they shared was a single roomed, 3rdclass house and John Lyden was the landholder.

 

McDonnell Family

The last family listed in the 1901 census for Moyard was the McDonnell family. Head of the family was Festus (50) and his wife Mary (48). Also in the house with them at that time were their 4 sons John (24), Thomas (22), Anthony (24?)[xxxvi]and Joseph (14). Anthony and Joseph could only speak English while the rest of the family spoke both Irish and English. Festus and Mary could not read while the rest could read and write. All of the family were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Festus and Thomas were herdsmen, John, an assistant herdsman, Mary, a house keeper and Anthony and Joseph were scholars. Their house was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and the landholder was Josephine McDonnell from Keelkyle.

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Moyard

Celia / Catherine Mullen– Application No. C16 6622. The application was received on 03/11/1916. The applicants name is given as Celia and Catherine Mullen. The address given was Mr Michael Corbett Senr. Attyrowerty, Moyard Co. Galway. Parents names were given as Patrick and Bonnugh or Bab (that was crossed out and Catherine was inserted) (Murphy). The address in 1851 was Moyard, Ballinakill, Ballynahinch, Co. Galway. In the left hand margin the names Mary, John, Celia, Patt and Dorcus were written in. The search was returned 06/11/1916 with a note saying ‘fam not found see over’. On 07/11/1916 another note added to that saying ‘not found 1841’. On a second pagesome hand written notes saying the following:

 

Patt (with an arrow pointing to the words ‘a publican’) and Catherine married 1835

 

John                Mary               Celea               Catherine

14                   12                   10                       7

 

Bridget                        Doratha (?)      Patt                 Honord (?)

5                       3                     1                       dead

 

Sheet 25

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Moyard

According to the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Robert Graham leased tenements to a number of people in Moyard. The church leased a church and yard on an area on land of 2 Acres and 2 Roods. For this they paid an annual rate of £1 10s for the land and £8 10s for the buildings. Thomas C. Butler leased an area of 1 Acre, 3 Roods and 10 Perches from Robert Graham for £1 annually. Rev. John Lynch leased an area of land of 37 Acres, 2 Roods and 3 Perches for an annual ratable valuation of £11 for the land and £15 for houses and offices on that land. The Porochial school lease a house at no rent but it had an annual ratable valuation of £5 10s. The Rev. John Lynch in turn leased some of the houses that he had leased to Patrick Browne, Stephen Conrey and Patrick Coyne. Patrick Browne paid 10s, Stephen Conrey paid 5s and Patrick Coyne paid 10s. John Gibbons leased 10 Acres of land from Robert Graham at a rate of £1 10s. Martin Conneely, John Lydon, Patrick Browne and Marcus King jointly leased 17 Acres, 1 Rood and 10 Perches of land, with houses and office from Robert Graham. Martin paid 13s for the land and 7s for the house and an office, John paid £1 2s for his piece of land and 8s for the house, Patrick paid 12s his part of the land and 8s for the house and Marcus paid £1 2s for the land and 8s for the house. Martin O’Mealy, Michael Thornton, Joseph Lynch and John Gibbons also jointly leased a plot of land with an area of 8 Acres and 1 Rood. Each had a house and some land and each paid 15s for their share of the land and 5s for the houses. James Mullen, Bridget King and James King leased 1 Acre and 3 Perches of land from Robert Graham for which James King paid 4s and the other 2 paid 2s. The same 3 also leased a separate area of 10 Aces and 34 Perches of land with a house each. James Mullen paid 18s for the land and 5s for the house, Bridget King paid 17s for the land and 5s for the house and James King paid 15s for the land an 10s for the house. Patrick Mullen leased a house, offices and land of an area of 11 Acres, 3 Roods and 8 Perches from Robert Graham. For this he paid £3 10s for the land and £1 for the buildings. Patrick and Peter Adams leased 10 Acres, 1 Rood and 15 Perches of land that had a house and offices on and paid £1 15s for the land and 10s for the buildings each. Timothy Adams, Honoria Browne and Thomas Browne leased 22 Acres and 34 Perches of land and buildings. Timothy paid £3 5s for the land and 15s for the buildings, Honoria paid £1 13s for the land and 7s for the buildings and Thomas paid £1 12s for the land and 8s for the house and offices. Michael Concannon and Hugh Conneely leased 11 Acres , 1 Rood and 7 Perches from Robert Graham on which they also had a house. Michael paid £1 7s for the land and 10s for the house annually while Hugh paid £1 8s for the land and 7s for the house. James Conneely then leased the house from Hugh Conneely for 5s. John and Mary Mullen and Mary Healy leased and area of 9 Acres, 2 Roods and 13 Perches from Robert Graham which also had buildings. John Paid £1 for his part of the land and 7s for the house, Mary Mullen paid 10s for the land and 5s for the house and Mary Healy paid £1 10s for the land and 8s for the buildings. Peter Joyce leased a house on an area of land of 11 Acres, 3 Roods and 30 Perches for which he paid £3 for the land and 10 s for the house. Joseph McDonnell leased land of an area of 21 Acres and 10 Perches on which there were houses and offices. For this he paid an annual rate of £7 for the land and £1 for the buildings. He then leased those houses to Martin Heany, William Conneely, Thomas Davin and Peter Nyland. Martin paid 10s annually for his house and the other 3 paid 5s for theirs. Timothy Nyland and William Reilly leased 10 Acres and 14 Perches of land containing a house each from Robert Graham for an annual rate of £1 10s for the land and 10s for the house each. Tennents of the townland leased 977 Acres, 1 Rood and 7 Perches of mountain land from Robert Graham at an annual rate of £10. There were 2 exemptions for payment. The church and yard had their £1 10s for the land and £8 10s for the building exempt from payment and the paorochial school had their £5 10s exempt from payment as well.

 

 

1670 Down Survey for Moyard

According to the 1670 Down Survey the 1841 owners of this area were Murrogh O’Flahartye, Mart O’Flahartye and Ne O’Flahartye, all were Catholic. The owner in 1670 was Richard, Earl of Westmeath also a Catholic. There were 522 plantation acres of unprofitable land and 167 plantation acres of profitable land. 167 plantation acres were forfeited.

 

 

Mweelin

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Mweelin

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       652.77 acres / 652 acres, 3 roods, 3 perches

 

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

1901 Census for Mweelin  (no records)

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Mweelin  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Mweelin

Logainm for Mweelin

NUI Galway Digital Collections forMweelin

 

 

 

1911 Census for Mweelin

Overview of Mweelin in 1911

According to the 1911 census there were 5 houses in Mweelin but only 1 was inhabited that being house 1. Information is only given for that house and it was constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and slate, iron or tiles for roofing. It was a 2ndclass house with 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front. There was also a cow house. There were a total of 6 people, 4 male and 2 female. The enumerator was Const. Thomas Casey.

 

Conroy family

The only family in Mweelin in 1911 was the Conroy family of 6. Head of the family was Thomas (43), a widower who had had 7 children all of whom survived. Five of his children lived in the house with him and they were Mary Kate (17), Patrick (16), Ellen (10), John (8) and Thomas (4). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. With the exception of Thomas, all spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. Thomas was a head shepherd and Patrick was a scholar. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house. The landholder was the Duke of Manchester.

 

Griffith’s Valuation(1847-1864) for Mweelin

According to the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) the Rev. Joseph Duncan had, for himself, 652 Acres, 3 Roods and 29 Perches of land, on which he had a herd’s house. The annual ratable valuation was £17 10s for the land and 10s for the herd’s house.

 

1670 Down Survey for Mweelin

The name for this area in the 1670 Down Survey was Moyllyn. The 1641 owner was the Catholic Connor Oge O’Duan and in 1670 the owner was the Catholic Richard, Earl of Westmeath. There was 323 plantation acres of unprofitable land and a 35 plantation acres of profitable land. 35 plantation acres were forfeited.

 

Roscrea

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Roscrea

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       124.20 acres / 124 acres, 0 roods, 32 perches

 

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

1901 Census for Roscrea  (no records)

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Roscrea  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Roscrea

Logainm for Roscrea

NUI Galway Digital Collections forRoscrea

 

 

1911 Census for Roscrea

Overview of Roscrea in 1911

There was only the one building in Roscrea in the 1911 census. It was built of stone, brick or concrete walls and slate, iron or tiles for roofing. It was a 2ndclass dwelling with 2 rooms and 3 windows. There were a total of 3 out buildings, those being a cow house, a calf house and a piggery. A total of 8 people lived there, 4 male and 4 female,. The enumerator was Const. John Hickey.

 

Pollington Family

The only family in Roscrea in 1911 was the Pollington family. The head of the family was Henery (sic) (39) and his wife Mary (35). They had been married for 15 years and they’d had 6 children all of whom survived. Those 6 children lived with them and were Charles Jas (sic) (14), Thomas H. (12), Annie Louisa (9), Martha Elizabeth (9), William Samuel (4) and Mary Alexandria (2). All were members of the Church of Ireland. Henery (sic) and Mary were born in Co. Galway, Charles Jas, Thomas H. and Annie Louisa were born in Moyard, Co. Galway and Martha Elizabeth, William Samuel and Mary Alexandria were born in Roscrea Co. Galway. All, with the exception of William Samuel and Mary Alexandria could read and write. Mary, Charles Jas and Thomas H spoke both Irish and English. Henery (sic) was a farmer while all the children, apart from Mary Alexandria, were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house, calf house and piggery. The landholder was Henry Pollington.

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Roscrea

Edmund O’Flaherty owned the land in Roscrea according to Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864). He leased tenements to Martin O’Flaherty, John Flaherty and the national school. Martin O’Flaherty leased 122 Acres, 3 Roods and 25 Perches of land with a herd’s house and offices at a ratable valuation of £40 for the land and £1 10s for the buildings. John Flaherty leased a house at a rate of 10s and the national school leased a house for £1 10s, however, this was exempt from payment.

 

1670 Down Survey for Roscrea

The 1670 Down Survey name for this area was Runemoyle. The owner in 1641 was Edmund O’Flaharty, a Catholic, and in 1670 the owner was Richard, Earl of Westmeath, also a Catholic. There were 1151 plantation acres of unprofitable land and 245 plantation acres of profitable land. 145 plantation acres were forfeited.

 

Rosleague

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Rosleague

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       226.74 acres / 226 acres, 2 roods, 38 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Rosleague  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Rosleague

Logainm for Rosleague

NUI Galway Digital Collections forRosleague

 

1911 Census for Rosleague

Overview of Rosleague in 1911.

There were 3 buildings in Rosleague in 1911 but only 2 of them were inhabited. The 2 inhabited buildings were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and slate, iron or tiled roofing. House 1 was a 1stclass dwelling while house 3 was 2ndclass. House 1 had 6 rooms and 5 windows and house 3 had 2 rooms and 2 windows. According to the out offices and farm-steadings return there were a total of 16 out buildings. These out buildings consisted of a stable, a coach house, a harness room, 2 cow houses, a calf house, 3 piggeries, a fowl house, a boiling house, a barn, a turf house, a potato house, a shed and a store. There were a total of 11 people in Rosleague, 5 male and 6 female. The enumerator was Const. John Hickey.

 

Browne                       (additional surnames: Wells, King, Fowler, O’Meara, Heanue andO’Neill)

The head of the house in house 1 was Charlotte Browne (55), a widow who had had 4 children

all of Which survived. In the house with her at that time were a boarder, Bertram C. Wells, 3 visitors, John B. King (72), his wife Anna King (70) who had been married for 25 years and Phyllis M.A. Fowler (18). Also there were 3 servants, Mary O’Meara (20), Bridget Heanue (18) and Michael O’Neill (22). John B. King and Bridget Heanue spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others which may indicate that they spoke only English. All of them could read and write. Charlotte Browne and Phyllis M.A. Fowler were Church of England, Bertram C. Wells, John B. King and Anna King were Protestant Episcopalian Church of Ireland. The others were Roman catholic. Charlotte Browne is listed as being a land owner, Bertram C. Wells was a priest BA, John B. King was a retired missionary. Phyllis M.A. Fowler was a lady help domestic, Mary O’Meara was a cook domestic servant, Bridget Heanue was a general domestic servant and Michael O’Neill was a gardener domestic servant. Charlotte Browne, John B. King and Bridget Heanue were born in Co. Galway. Bertram C. Wells was born in India, Anna King was born in Dublin, Phyllis M.A. Fowler was born in England , Mary O’Meara was born in Co. Tipperary and Michael O’Neill was born in Co. Louth. The house they lived in was a 1stclass, 6 roomed dwelling with a stable, a coach house, a harness room, 2 cow houses, a calf house, 3 piggeries, a fowl house, a boiling house, a barn, a turf house, a potato house, a shed and a store. The landholder was Charlotte Browne.

 

Mannion Family

Head of the Mannion family was Norah (29) who was married for 5 years and had 2 children. Those 2 children were in the house with her at that time and were John (4) and Martin (3mths). All were Roman catholic and born in Co. Galway. Norah is listed as being able to read and write. there is nothing listed for language which may indicate that they spoke only English. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass house. The landholder was Charlotte Browne.

 

1901 Census for Rosleague

Overview of Rosleague in 1901.

In 1901 there was on the 1 house in Rosleague. It was built of stone, brick or concrete walls and slate, iron or tiles for roofing. It was a 1stclass dwelling with 5 rooms and 5 windows. There were q total of 7 people 2 male and 5 female. The enumerator was Const. Edward Robinson.

 

Browne Family                                   (additional surnames:Prise, Coyne and Conneely)

The only house in Rosleague in 1901 was that of the Browne family. The head of the family was the widow Charlotte (44). Three of her children lived with her and they were Sidney (21), Mary (18) and Cyril (17). Also in the house at that time were, a visitor Gertrude Prise (34) and 2 servants, Jane Coyne (26) and Anne Conneely (24). All could read and write and Sidney, Cyril, Jane and Anne spoke both Irish and English. Jane and anne were Roman Catholic and the rest were Church of Ireland. Gertrude was born in England and the rest were born in Co. Galway. Sidney is listed as a medical student R.C.G.P., Mary and Cyril were scholars, Gertrude was a hospital nurse and Jane and Anne were domestic servants. The house was a 5 roomed, 1stclass house and the landholder was Charlotte Browne.

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Rosleague

The Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) shows that Henry G. Fletcher owned the land in this area. The area of land was 218 Acres, 3 Roods and 2 Perches and included a house and offices. A annual ratable valuation of £60 for the land £20 for the buildings was paid. He also had 2 islands of an area of 28 Perches but they were of no agricultural value.

 

1670 Down Survey for Rosleague

The 1670 Down Survey name for this area was Rossleague. He 1641 owner was the Catholic

Edmund O’Flaharty and in 1670 the owner was the protestant Francis Browne. There were 114

plantation acres of unprofitable land and 38 plantation acres of profitable land. 38 plantation

acres were forfeited.

 

Ross

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

Townland:                               Ross

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       139.00 acres / 138 acres, 3 roods, 39 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Ross  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Ross

Logainm for Ross

NUI Galway Digital Collections forRoss

 

1911 Census forRoss

Overview of Ross in 1911

There was only dwelling registered in the 1911 census. It was constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and slate, iron or tiles for roofing. It was a 1stclass dwelling with6 rooms and 8 windows. There were a total of 22 out buildings consisting of 3 stables, a coach house, a harness room, 2 cow houses, 3 calf houses, a dairy, a piggery, a fowl house, a boiling house, 2 barns, a turf house, a potato house, 2 sheds, a store and a laundry. There were a total of 9 people, 4 male and 5 female. The enumerator was Const. Edmund Moloney.

 

Seton Family               (additional surnames: Snow, Fortune, Courcey, Beggy and Darcy)

The head of the Seton family was George (48) and his wife Louisa Young Seton (36) who had been married for 6 years and had had 2 children both of which survived. Living in the house with them at that time were their 2 children Alexander George (3) and Archibald Baron (1). Also in the house were 5 servants, Charles Snow (20), Bridget Josephine Fortune (33), Mary Anne Courcey (28), Mary Christina Beggy (21) and Mary Ellen Darcy (15). All, except the Alexander George and Archibald Baron, could read and write. Only Mary Anne is listed under the language column as speaking both Irish and English, this possibly means the others could only speak English. George Seton was a member of the Presbyterian Protestant Established Ch Scot, Louisa Young was a member of the Protestant Episcopalian Church of Ireland, Alexander George and Archibald Baron were Church of Ireland and the others were Roman Catholic. George was born in Scotland, Louisa Yong was born in Kings Co.[xxxvii], Alexander George and Archibald Baron were born in Dublin and Charles Snow was born in England. Bridget Josephine was born in Wexford, Mary Anne was born in Co. Galway, Connemara, Mary Christina was born in Co. Meath and Co. Westmeath. George was recorded as an Argentine land owner, Charles was a Gardener D servant, Bridget Josephine was a nurse domestic servant, Mary Anne was a cook domestic servant, Mary Christina was a house parlour Maid domestic servant and Mary Ellen was a nurse maid domestic servant. The house was a 6 roomed, 1stclass dwelling. The out buildings included 3 stables, a coach house, a harness room, 2 cow houses, 3 calf houses, a dairy, a piggery, a fowl house, a boiling house, 2 barns, a turf house, a potato house, 2 sheds, a store and a laundry. The landholder was Catherine Tullock.

 

1901 Census for Ross

Overview of Ross in 1901

There was only 1 dwelling in Ross in 1901 according to the census of that year. I was a building constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and slate, iron or tiled roof. It was a 1stclass house with 5 rooms and 8 windows in the front. There were a total of 11 people, 4 male and 7 female. The enumerator was Const. Thomas O’Grady.

 

Davis Family                          (additional surnames: Blake, Cysser, Conlson, Murray, McLoughlin, Faherty, Ryan and MacKay)

Head of the Davis family was John (68) who was married to Gertrude (36) and they had 1

daughter living with them Ardlen (13). Also in the house at that time was a visitor, Maude

Blake (2), a boarder Elie Cysser (sic) (21) and 6 servants, William Conlson (sic) (28), Bridget

Murray (35), Norah McLoughlin (20), Stephen Faherty (17), Thomas Ryan (30) and Annie

MacKay (30). All could read and write and Arden, Maude, Elie (sic), Norah and Stephen could

speak both Irish and English but nothing was entered for the others, so that probably indicates

that they only spoke English. Bridget, Norah, Stephen, Thomas and Annie were Roman Catholic

and the rest were Church of Ireland. John and Bridget were born in Dublin, Gertrude was born in

Co. Dublin, Maude was born in Galway, Elie (sic) was born in England, William was born in

Durham, England. Norah and Stephen were born in Co. Galway, Thomas was born in Co.

Tipperary and Annie was born in Wexford. John Davis was a retired general, Ardlen was a

scholar, Maude was an artist, Elie was a governess, William was a butler, Bridget was a cook,

Norah was a kitchen maid, Stephen was a groom, Thomas was a coachman and Annie was a

house maid. The house was a 1stclass, 5 roomed house and the landholder was W.A.L. Tullock.

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Ross

According to the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Robert Graham leased tenements to a number of people and Thomas Y. Prior sub leased some tenements as well. Thomas Y. Prior leased 125 Acres, 1 Rood and 23 Perches from Robert Graham. This included houses and offices. The offices value was £10 but was not ratable until 1859. He paid £55 for the land and £15 for the buildings. He then kept a house for himself for a annual rate of 15s and leased land and buildings to Benjamin Tyrrell, Robert Marrow and James Caldwell. Benjamin and Robert leased a house and garden at a rate of 2s for the land and 18s for the houses each. The land area they leased was 10 Perches. James leased a house and offices at an annual rate of 15s. There were 3 vacant houses on the land that Thomas Y. Prior leased and those had an annual ratable valuation of  £1, 15s and 10s. William Staunton and Lawrence Heany jointly leased 2 plots of land from Robert Graham. One plot was an area of 2 Roods and 35 Perches and the other was 2 Roods and 32 Perches. For the larger plot they paid 1s each and the smaller plot was 2s each. Bridget Conneely and Thomas and Martin Rowan jointly leased 2 Roods and 2 Perches of land for which Bridget paid 2s and Thomas and Martin paid 1s each. Richard Davis and John Coyne leased 2 plots of land from Robert Graham. The larger plot was 1 Acre, 1 Rood and 25 Perches and the other was 1 Acre, 1 Rood and 28 Perches. For the larger plot they paid 2s and the smaller plot 3s each. Michael Mongan leased 3 Acres, 2 Roods and 20 Perches of land from Robert Graham for 7s annually and Thomas Gannon leased 4 Acres, 2 Roods and 1 Perch for 10s annually.

 

1670 Down Survey for Ross

The 1670 Down Survey name for this area was Rosse and Derrylahane. The 1641 owner was the Catholic Edmund O’Flaharty and the 1670 owner was Richard, Earl of Westmeath, also a Catholic. There were 83 plantation acres of unprofitable land and 87 plantation acres of profitable land. 87 plantation acres were forteited.

Tievegarriff

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Tievegarriff

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       123.23 acres / 123 acres, 0 roods, 36 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

1911 Census for Tievegarriff  (no records)

1901 Census for Tievegarriff  (no records)

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Tievegarriff  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Tievegarriff

Logainm for Tievegarriff

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Tievegarriff

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Tievegarriff

Robert Graham owned most of the land in this area and leased tenements to a number of people. Thomas and Martin Rowan jointly leased an area of 13 Acres, 2 Roods and 3 Perches from Robert Graham which included houses and offices and they paid £1 15s for the land and 10s for the buildings. Patrick King leased an area of 8 Acres, 3 Roods and 22 Perches which included a house. He paid an annual rate of £2 10s for the land and 10s for the house. Peter Conneely and Martin Keane jointly leased an area of 6 Acres and 36 Perches which contained a house. Each of the paid £1 5s for their respective share of the land and Peter paid 5s for the house. Gregory Conneely leased a house on 5 Acres, 3 Roods and 13 perches of land. He paid an annual rate of £2 for the land and 10s for the house. Myles Burke leased 4 Acres, 2 Roods and 14 Perches of land that contained a house from Robert Graham for which he paid £1 2s for the land and 8s for the house. He then sub leased the house to Mary Adams for 5s annually. Bridget Conneely and Thomas and Martin Rowan jointly leased an area of 6 Acres and 9 Perches. Bridget paid 17s for the land and 8s for a house on that land while Thomas and Martin paid 8s each for their share of the land. William Staunton and Lawrence Heany leased 5 Acres, 2 Roods and 37 Perches of land which contained 2 houses.  They each paid 17s for the land and 5s for the houses. Richard Davis and John Coyne jointly leased and area of 8 Acres and 18 Perches of land that contained houses. They each paid an annual rate of £1 5s for the land and 10s for the houses. Michael Mongan leased 6 Acres 3 Roods and 13 Perches of land containing a house. He paid £1 12s for the land and 8s for the house. Thomas Gannon leased 11 Acres, 3 Roods and 14 Perches of land containing a house. He paid £3 for the land and 10s for the house. The tenants of the townland also had 41 Acres, 1 Rood and 19 Perches of mountain land that had an annual ratable valuation of £2 10s. In addition there was 1 island with an area of 3 Roods and 32 Perches that was of no agricultural value.

 

1670 Down Survey for Tievegarriff

The 1670 Down Survey name for this area was Glancrawe. The 1641 owner was the Catholic Edmund O’Flaharty and the 1670 owner was the protestant Sir Thomas Meredith.

 

Tievemore

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Tievemore

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       48.71 acres / 48 acres, 2 roods, 33 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

1911 Census for Tievemore  (no records)

1901 Census for Tievemore  (no records)

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Tievemore  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Tievemore

Logainm for Tievemore

NUI Galway Digital Collections forTievemore

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Tievemore

Thomas Y. Prior leased 48 Acres, 2 Roods and 12 Perches of land from Robert Graham and an annual rate of £23.

 

1670 Down Survey for Tievemore

The 1670 Down Survey name for this area was Tivemore. The 1641 owner was Edmund O’Flaharty who was a Catholic and the 1670 owner was Richard, Earl of Westmeath, also a Catholic. There were 6 plantation acres of unprofitable land and 25 plantation acres of profitable land. 25 plantation acres were forfeited.

 

Ungwee

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Ungwee

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       654.79 acres / 654 acres, 3 roods, 6 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Ungwee  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Ungwee

Logainm for Ungwee

NUI Galway Digital Collections forUngwee

 

1911 Census for Ungwee

Overview of Ungwee in 1911

There were 6 houses in Ungwee in 1911 all of which were private dwellings. All the houses had stone, brick or concrete walls. House 6 had slate, iron or tiles for roofing while the rest had thatch, wood or other perishable materials. Houses 3, 4 and 6 were 2ndclass houses with 2 rooms and 3 windows in the front and houses 1, 2 and 5 were 3rdclass with 2 rooms and 2 windows. According to the out offices and farm-steading return there were a total of 20 out buildings which consisted of 4 stables, 6 cow houses, 5 calf houses, 4 piggeries and 1 shed. There were a total of 24 people, 13 male and 11 female. The enumerator was Const. John Hickey.

 

Moran

The only person living in house 1 was Philip (64). He spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. He was a Roman Catholic born in Co. Galway. Philip was listed as a farmer. The house he lived in was a 2 roomed 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and calf house. The landholder was Philip Moran.

 

Folan Family

Head of the Folan family was Pat (76) who had been married to his wife, Norah (65), for 40 years and they’d had 4 children all of which had survived. Their so John (33) was also in the house at that time. They all spoke both Irish and English but only John could read and write. All 3 were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Pat was recorded as being a tenant farmer and John was a farmer’s son.  The house they lived in was a 2 roomed 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house, calf house and piggery. The landholder was Pat Folan.

 

Joyce Family

House 3 was the Joyce household and head of the family was John (61) and his wife Eliza (54) and they had been married for 30 years and had had 12 children of which 10 survived. Six of their children lived with them and they were Peter J. (24), Patrick (23), John (22) Nara (18), Maggie (18) and Delia (16). All could read and write and John and Eliza spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others so that possibly meant that they only spoke English. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John was listed as a farmer, Peter J. Patrick and John (22) were farmer’s sons, Nara and Maggie were farmer’s daughters and Delia was a scholar. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with stable, cow house, calf house, piggery and a shed. John Joyce was the landholder.

 

Joyce Family

Head of the Joyce family in house 4 was Patrick (94). With him in the house at that time were his son Michael (43) who had been married to his wife Catherine (35) for 8 years and had had 3 children of which 2 survived. Their children, Patrick’s grandchildren, also lived in the house and they were Mary Anne (7) and Patrick Joseph (4). Patrick and Patrick Joseph could not read but the others could both read and write. Patrick, John and Catherine spoke both Irish and English. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Patrick is recorded as being a farmer and Michael a farmer’s son while Mary Anne was a scholar. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with cow house, calf house and piggery. The landholder was Patrick Joyce.

 

Lyden family

The 2 members of the Lyden family were John (69) and Honor (70) who had been married for 42 years and had had 9 children of which 7 survived. Both could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John was a farmer. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable, cow house and piggery. The landholder was John Joyce.

 

Joyce Family                          (additional surname: O’Grearnáin(?))

Head of the Joyce family in house 6 was Brigid (68) who had been married for 35 years and had had 8 children all of whom survived. Three of her children lived with her and they were Martin (34), Brigid (18) and Nora (16) as well as the family there was a lodger Seamus (?) O’Grearnáin (?) (26). All spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin was a farmer, Brigid and Seamus (?) were teachers and Nora was a scholar. The house they shared was a 2ndclass, 2 roomed house with 2 stables, a cow house and a calf house. The landholder was Bridget Joyce.

 

1901 Census forUngwee

Overview of Ungwee in 1901.

There are 6 dwellings in the 1901 census for Ungwee. They all had had stone, brick or concrete walls and house 2 had slate, iron or tiles for roofing while the others only had thatch, wood or other perishable material. Houses 1 and 2 were 2ndclass dwellings and the rest were 3rdclass. Houses 1 and 2 had 2 rooms and 3 windows in the front, houses 3, 4 and 6 had 1 room and 2 windows while house 5 only had 1 room and 1 window. They were all private dwellings. There were a total of 32 people in Ungwee, 16 male and 16 female. The enumerator was Const. Edward Robinson.

 

Joyce Family

The Joyce family in house 1 had 12 members. The head of the family was John (48) and his wife Eliza (45). They had 10 children living with them at that time and they were Theo (20), Mary Anne (18), Michael John (16), Peter Joseph (14), Patrick (12), John William (10), Elizabeth (8), Norah (7), Maggie (6) and Delia (5). All the family could read and write and John and Eliza spoke Irish and English while the children only spoke English.  John was born in Co. Galway but nothing is recorded for the rest of them. All were Roman Catholic. John was a farmer, Eliza was a house keeper, Theo and Michael John were farmer’s sons, Mary Anne was a farmer’s daughter and the rest of the children were scholars. The house they shared was a 2ndclass, 2 roomed house and John Joyce was the landholder,

 

Joyce Family                          (additional surname: Trinon (?))

The head of this Joyce family was Bridget (45). She had 6 of her children living with her in the house at that time and they were Martin (21), Thomas (14), Mary (23), Agnes (11), Bridget (8) and Norah (5) as well as a boarder Michael Trinon (?) (22). All of the could read and write and Bridget (48) could speak both Irish and English while the rest could only speak English. All were Roman Catholic and Michael Trinon was born in Co. Roscommon while the rest were born in Co. Galway. Bridget was a house keeper, Martin was a farmer, Thomas, Agnes, Bridget (8) and Norah were scholars, Mary was a seamstress and Michael was a teacher. The house they shared was a 2ndclass, 2 roomed dwelling. The landholder was Bridget Joyce.

 

Lydon Family

The head of the Lydon family was John (50) and his wife Honour (45) and with them in the house were 2 of their children Annie (19) and Kate (15). They all could read and write and John and Honour spoke both Irish and English while Annie and Kate only spoke English. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John was recorded as being a farmer and Annie and Kate were farmer’s daughters. The house they shared was a single room, 3rdclass dwelling and the landholder was John Lydon.

 

Folan Family

The head of the Folan family in house 4 was Patrick (65) and his wife Honor (50). In the house with them at that time were their sons John (21) and Michael (19). All, apart from Michael, spoke both Irish and English. Only John and Michael could read and write. All 4 were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick is listed as a farmer and Michael and John were farmer’s sons. The house they lived in was a 3rdclass, 1 roomed house and the landholder was Patrick Folan.

 

Joyce Family

Another Joyce family lived in house 5 and the head of this family was Patrick (80), a widower. Living with him were his son Michael (25) and his daughter Jane (21). All spoke both Irish and English and all could read and write. All the family were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Patrick was a farmer, Michael, a farmer’s son and Jane was a house keeper. Their house was a single roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Patrick Joyce was the landholder.

 

Moran

The sole occupant of house 6 was Philip Moran (54). He was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. Philip could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. He was a farmer. His house was a 3rdclass, 1 roomed house and he was the landholder.

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Ungwee

Robert Graham owned most of the land in this area and he leased tenements to a number of people. He leased 1 Acre and 2 Roods to Honoria Joyce which included a house. She paid 5s for the land and 5s for the house. Patrick Moran leased 68 Acres and 25 Perches from Robert Graham which also included a house for which Patrick paid 316 5s for the land and 5s for the house. Mary Conrey then leased the house from Patrick Moran for an annual rate of 10s. Michael Conneely leased 5Acres, 2 Roods and 20 Perches of land for £1. Martin O’Flaherty leased 2 Roods and 10 Perches from Edmund O’Flaherty for 5s. Patrick Joyce and Michael Heany jointly leased 22 Acres and 1 Rood from Robert Graham that included houses and offices for which the each paid £2 for the land and 8s for the buildings. Michael Joyce leased a house and 11 Acres of land from Robert Graham at a rate of £1 for the land and 5s for the house. Martin Joyce leased 17 Acres, 1 Rood and 10 Perches of land including house and offices for £3 15s for the land and 15 s for the buildings. Robert Corbett leased 38 Acres, 3 Roods and 14 Perches of land with house and offices for £2 15s for the land and 10s for the buildings. Michael Mullen leased 3 Acres, 2 Roods and 20 Perches of land for 10s annually. Matthias Corbett leased 4 Acres and 3 Roods of land for an annual rate of 5s. Robert Graham held 2 plots of land for himself. They were areas of 13 Acres and 2 Roods and 465 Acres and 6 Perches. The annual ratable valuation for those plots were, for the large one £3 and the small one £2. There was also 10Acres, 1 Rood and 12 Perches of water.

 

1670 Down Surveyfor Ungwee

The 1670 Down Survey name for this area was Umgee. The 1641 owners were O’Flahartye, Donnell Mc Owen who were Catholics and in 1670 the owner was Richard, Earl of Westmeath, also a Catholic. There were 505 plantation acres of unprofitable land and 56 plantation acres of profitable land. 56 plantation acres were forfeited.

 

 

 

[i]Judging by the age of the head of the family, Anne, possibly Ellen would be a granddaughter and not daughter.

[ii]On the House and Building return on the census, the head of the family is listed as Maggie Brady.

[iii]On the House and Building return on the census, the head of the family is listed as John Kane.

[iv]On the House and Building return on the census, the head of the family is listed as Michael King.

[v]Unclear as to why. The building is listed as being built.

[vi]First name difficult to make out on the household return form.

[vii]No record under the relation to head column.

[viii]Could possibly mean that the rest only had English.

[ix]Possibly another name for Honor?

[x]Possibly the lessor didn’t want to be named or their name wasn’t known.

[xi]Probably indicates that they spoke only English

[xii]Surname difficult to decipher. Possibly Trullach

[xiii]Surname difficult to decipher. Possibly Trullach

[xiv]Probably indicates that they spoke only English

[xv]Probably indicates that they spoke only English

[xvi]In the household return form it could be Horah or possibly a bad spelling of Honah?

[xvii]Probably indicates that they spoke only English

[xviii]Probably indicates that they spoke only English

[xix]Probably indicates that they spoke only English

[xx]Probably indicates that they spoke only English

[xxi]Probably indicates that they spoke only English

[xxii]Possibly Desmond ?

[xxiii]Difficult to decipher from the household return form but possibly Mannion.

[xxiv]Most likely Lanarkshire.

[xxv]Probably indicates that they spoke only English

[xxvi]This name on the household return form is difficult to read. Looks like Watters or maybe Walters.

[xxvii]Probably indicates that they spoke only English

[xxviii]Probably indicates that they spoke only English

[xxix]Difficult to decipher from the house and building return

[xxx]Possibly Dalery

[xxxi]Very hard to decipher in the household return.

[xxxii]Very difficult to decipher on the household return.

[xxxiii]The census return for the MacConrígh family was written all in Irish.

[xxxiv]Difficult to decipher this name. It ends in “atie” by the look of it, so maybe Katie?

[xxxv]On the household return her name was spelt “Margret” and on the house and building return her name was spelt “Margaret”.

[xxxvi]Possibly 14?

[xxxvii]County Offaly

This page was added on 17/07/2018.

No Comments

Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this page!

Add a comment about this page

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Share this
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone